diabetestalk.net

Is Ketosis Good For Your Liver

Paleo Diet: Ketosis And Liver Disease

Paleo Diet: Ketosis And Liver Disease

I know what you’re thinking “jeeze, Barry’s been really anti-low-carb recently….what’s the deal!?”. Well, let me be clear that I’m really not against low-carb at all. In fact, I think low-carb or ketogenic Paleo is hands down the best way for a person to lose some body-fat, and reign-in any autoimmune or metabolic issues they may have. But, as I encountered recently with my own diet, staying very-low-carb or ketogenic long-term just doesn’t seem to be a good idea. For some reason, at some point, people began believing that Paleo is by default a low-carb diet…..which it really is not. It can be if fat-loss is desired, but it certainly doesn’t have to be by any stretch of the imagination. As I’ve mentioned in earlier articles, being very-low-carb for a very-long-time can wreak havoc on a person’s Thyroid function, and according to a short but sweet blog post by Peter of Hyperlipid, Ketosis could eventually cause a certain type of liver disease. On February 13th 2012, Peter posted a blog article titled “NASH on a Ketogenic Diet”. Firstly, what on earth is “NASH”? “Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH is a common, often “silent” liver disease. It resembles alcoholic liver disease, but occurs in people who drink little or no alcohol. The major feature in NASH is fat in the liver, along with inflammation and damage. Most people with NASH feel well and are not aware that they have a liver problem. Nevertheless, NASH can be severe and can lead to cirrhosis, in which the liver is permanently damaged and scarred and no longer able to work properly. NASH affects 2 to 5 percent of Americans. An additional 10 to 20 percent of Americans have fat in their liver, but no inflammation or liver damage, a condition called “fatty liver.” Although ha Continue reading >>

Following A Ketogenic Diet Without A Gallbladder

Following A Ketogenic Diet Without A Gallbladder

Since the 1920s, ketogenic diets have been used as a therapeutic method to treat obesity, epilepsy, diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer and many other pathological diseases (1). This very low carbohydrate diet that combines moderate protein consumption with high amounts of quality fats puts the body into a state of fat or ketone adaptation. Following a ketogenic diet without a gallbladder can pose complications because of the body’s inability to adequately secrete bile to break down fatty meals. Fortunately, these 7 strategies will answer your concerns for maintaining ketosis without a gallbladder. What Is Ketosis? When net carbohydrate consumption remains less than 50 g/day (in some cases under 30g/day), insulin concentration reduces and the body begins using stored fat for energy via lipogenesis (1). Following 3 to 4 days of this dietary carbohydrate restriction, the central nervous system (CNS) has an inadequate supply of glucose and must seek other fuel. The alternate energy source the CNS seeks along with tissues and organs is ketone bodies. These ketone bodies are produced at high concentrations in the liver during the metabolic state of ketogenesis which is also attainable during periods of prolonged fasting. The 3 major ketone bodies include acetate, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. Ketosis results in numerous health promoting benefits including: (1) Decreased fatty acid production Increased metabolism of fats and lipids Higher metabolic rate to use ketone bodies Improved mitochondrial function Modified satiety hormones including ghrelin and leptin Regulates blood lipid levels including triglycerides and cholesterol Reduced insulin signaling Improved glycemic control Reduced whole body inflammatory levels Is a Ketogenic Diet Right for You? When nutr Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of Liver And Cardiometabolic Health Benefits On Low Carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet

Evaluation Of Liver And Cardiometabolic Health Benefits On Low Carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet

To evaluate the impact of a Low Carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet (LCKD) weight loss program and compare to the standard of care program established for patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) on: (1) Liver fat and liver stiffness scores, (2) lipid profile and insulin sensitivity; and (3) depression scores and quality of life, and (4) Cardiometabolic measures such as cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) and transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). This prospective pilot pragmatic trial will investigate the role of a LCKD weight loss program for obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) and compare it to the group of known obese NAFLD patients who receive dietetic counseling as part of their standard of care in a dedicated NAFLD program. All participants (n=50) will be recruited at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). Patients will do initial paperwork including Questionnaires QOL, eating disorder screen, depression screen: QOL, eating disorder screen and depression screen. Labwork: Data will be collected from routine care labwork to include a fasting cholesterol panel, insulin, A1c and comprehensive panel (if they have not received these labs in the preceding 3 months), and at 6 and 12 months. A1c will be collected at 3,6,9 months as well (if A1c >/=7), or just additionally at 6 months if A1c <7 Study labs will be collected: Blood at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months Urine, stool and saliva at 0, 1, 3 and 12 months Fibroscan will be done at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months Echo/CPET testing and Room calorimetry will be offered and the patients agreeing to do this will have them done at 0, 3 and 12 months Study Type : Observational Estimated Enrollment : 100 participants Observational Model: Cohort Time Perspective: Prospective Official Title: Evaluation of Liver and Cardiometabolic Health Bene Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

“my Fatty Liver Is Gone”

“my Fatty Liver Is Gone”

Here’s another remarkable success story on LCHF: The Email My name is Vicente and I am a 43 year-old guy from Spain. Just before last summer my doctor told me I had to lose weight, again. At that time I weighed about 94 kg (207 lbs). I am 175 cm (5’9″) tall. My non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) had returned. It had improved by losing weight the previous time. But after slimming, once again I regained the lost weight and the fatty liver came back. My iron was out of limits (the ferritin, to be precise). I was taking omeprazole for my GERD. The doctor gave me a paper with a summary table of the calories from different foods. The message I got was that I should control the amount of calories I was eating. It’s a nice doctor, but he has no idea about nutrition, obviously. Anyway, I started to eat less, again. I also increased the amount of exercise I was doing, spending at least half an hour every day on the exercise bike. Instinctively I eliminated bread and pasta from my diet and I started eating very little, about 1200 calories/day. I was often hungry, but I have willpower. I used fatsecret.es to control what I was eating. It is a free page where you write down what you eat and it tells you how many total calories, carbohydrates, protein and fat you are consuming. Now I think it was a mistake to eat so little, but I was desperate to lose weight and did not know what else to do. I lost a few kilos but after about three months I reached a plateu. I had stalled and I was eating only 1200 calories/day! So I thought that as soon as I ate a normal amount of food, around 1700-2000 calories, I would recover all the lost weight (no doubt I would have). I was scared and I started reading articles on the internet about the rebound effect, looking for a way to avoid Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet To Treat Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease – Does It Make Sense?

Low-carb Diet To Treat Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease – Does It Make Sense?

Approximately 30 percent of people in the United States have a disease that is characterized by abnormal deposits of fat in the liver. The disease is not contagious, and unlike many other disorders of the liver, it is not caused by overconsumption of alcohol. It is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease in many countries around the world (1). It is normal to have fat in the liver. However, if the amount of fat is more than 5-10 percent of the weight of the liver, fatty liver disease is probably present. But why is having much fat in the liver a bad thing? NAFLD may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which is associated with inflammation and may result in chronic scarring of the liver and liver cancer (2). Furthermore, patients with NAFLD have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. (3). The prevalence of NAFLD has increased steadily during the last 25-30 years, along with the prevalence of central obesity, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome (4). Most individuals with NAFLD have increased abdominal fat and signs of insulin resistance which is reflected in high blood levels of triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension). So, an educated guess might be that NAFLD is caused by eating too much or that it is caused by eating too much of the wrong thing. The Role of Insulin Resistance and Carbohydrates It is primarily triglycerides that accumulate in the liver in patients with NAFLD. Triglycerides are composed of three fatty acids attached to a molecule of glycerol. But, where do the fatty acids come from and why do they load up in the liver? The Role of Insulin Resistance Insulin is a hormone produced by beta cell Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Is Probably Not For You

The Ketogenic Diet Is Probably Not For You

All the big claims are way ahead of the evidence. Michael Easter Oct 27 2017, 8:16pm Hex/Stocksy Low-fat was high fashion two decades ago. Cutting carbs and pounding protein was big in the 2000s. Now, fat is making a serious comeback: The ketogenic diet—comprised of 80 to 90 percent fat—the pitch goes, is the secret to everything from losing more weight to adding 10 years to your life, increasing your productivity, and purging your body of cancer cells. As of this writing, two of Amazon's top 10 nutrition books are ketogenic diet-focused. Google searches about the diet have grown nearly 20-fold over the last five years. Kim K, Lebron, Tim McGraw, and Gwyneth Paltrow have all gone keto. But just as other "don't eat this" or "eat more of that" diets of the past didn't cure all, so goes the ketogenic diet. "It's one of these diets where so many people are talking about losing tons of weight, improving their health risks, beating cancer, and all these other lofty claims," says Stephan Guyenet, an obesity researcher and author of The Hungry Brain. "But all those big claims are far ahead of the current scientific evidence." Advertisement Then there's this catch: Eating keto is a big, fat pain in the ass. Some background: The ketogenic diet "works" by altering how your body powers itself. By cutting carbs to nearly nothing, eating minimal protein and mostly fat, you shift from drawing energy primarily from glycogen—a sugar stored in your muscles and liver that you mainly draw from carbohydrates—to ketones, molecules your liver produces in the absence of glycogen. It takes about one to three days to enter this ketone-fueled state, called ketosis. Think of the process like converting your car's gas engine to a diesel engine. Your car and the experience of driving it is b Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Really Bad For You?

Is Ketosis Really Bad For You?

A patient recently asked me how bad being in nutritional ketosis was for her. I responded that the worse problem I’ve seen recently is the patient that broke his toe when he slipped on bacon grease. Are there risks with a ketogenic diet? Yes, but these usually only occur when you cheat or fall off the wagon. What problems can arise? Lets talk about them individually. First, as I stated above, make sure you don’t slip on bacon the grease. It really can be an issue if you’re not used to using increased amounts of fat in your kitchen. So, be prepared for how to cook and use fat. Grandma understood this well, we could learn a great deal from her if you ask her about using bacon grease. Second, let’s define the difference between ketosis and keto-acidosis and try to clarify the misinformation that is being spread around the blogosphere. A ketone is a molecule the body produces from the breakdown of fat (specifically triglycerides) and some proteins (amino acids). There are specifically three types of ketones: beta-hydroxybutyric acid, acetoacetic acid and acetone. If ketosis was “bad,” then why would our bodies produce these molecules? They are not bad, and in fact, multiple studies show that the body is often more efficient in weight loss, inflammatory reduction, bowel function, epigenetic influence and maintenance of lean body mass more effectivly when it functions on ketones rather than glucose as its primary fuel source. You can see these studies here, here, here and here. The body can only supply a limited amount of sugar or glucose for fuel. If you talk to runners, marathoners or triathletes, they will tell you that after about 45-90 minutes of continuous endurance exercise the glucose supply runs out and they will experience what is termed a “bonk” (ha Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease And Ketogenic Diets

Fatty Liver Disease And Ketogenic Diets

Fatty liver disease is a condition in which the liver becomes clogged with excess fat due to elevated triglyceride levels within the body. The condition is strongly linked to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and prediabetes. When the fat stored in the liver accounts for more than 10% of the liver’s weight, the function of the liver becomes compromised, and the liver can't metabolize insulin and fine tune blood sugar levels as it would normally. This type of liver disease is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or hepatic steatosis and if left untreated, it can result in liver damage or liver cancer. What Causes NAFLD? High Triglycerides High blood triglyceride levels associated with high carbohydrate and fructose consumption. The elevated triglycerides which cause fatty liver disease are a direct result of a diet which is high in carbohydrates, and specifically, high in fructose. Studies have shown that fructose consumption elevates blood pressure, sky rockets triglyceride levels and increases inflammation and insulin resistance in the liver. Insulin resistant body systems. A high carb consumption and lack of exercise is strongly associated with the development of overall body insulin resistance and high triglycerides levels. See this study, and this study shows that a high carbohydrate diet is linked to liver dysfunction. Vegetable Oil Consumption High levels of vegetable oil consumption. Vegetables oils contain omega-6 polyunsaturated fats which are inflammatory when consumed in large amounts. In addition, they are often hydrogenated to solidify them, and this introduces trans-fats which can also damage the liver. The most prevalent are corn, canola, and soybean oil. These oils are commonly found in commercial mayonnaise and salad dressings. Altern Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis? Hint: It Can Help You Burn Fat & Suppress Your Appetite

What Is Ketosis? Hint: It Can Help You Burn Fat & Suppress Your Appetite

We’ve longed been told that calorie restriction, increasing exercise and reducing dietary fat intake are the keys to weight loss. But, if you’ve ever attempted to control your weight by subsisting on fewer calories — especially from mostly bland “diet foods”— you’re already probably aware that this typically produces minimal results and is extremely hard to stick with long-term or consistently. Considering the high rates of obesity now facing most developed nations — along with an increased risk for health conditions like diabetes or heart problems as a result — researchers have been anxiously working on how to suppress appetite and achieve weight loss in a healthy, sustainable manner. The keto diet has emerged over the past several decades as one potential answer to this large-scale weight loss problem. (1) While there are some differences in opinion, depending on who you ask, regarding the best approach to very low-carb dieting, studies consistently show that the ketogenic diet (also called the keto diet) produces not only substantial weight loss for a high percentage of people who adhere to it, but also other important health benefits such as reductions in seizures, markers of diabetes and more. The keto diet revolves around eating foods that are high in natural fats, consuming only moderate protein and severely restricting the number of carbs eaten each day. Even if you don’t have much weight to lose, entering into a state of ketosis can be helpful for other reasons — such as for improved energy levels, mental capabilities and mood stabilization. What Is Ketosis? Ketosis is the result of following the ketogenic diet, which is why it’s also sometimes called “the ketosis diet.” Ketosis takes place when glucose from carbohydrate foods (like Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Duck Dodgers October 14, 2014 Peter, An article by Per Wikholm was published in this month’s LCHF Magasinet, where Per demonstrates that the Inuit could not have been in ketosis given that the scientific literature is abundantly clear, over and over again, that the Inuit consumed too much protein, and more importantly, Per debunks Stefansson’s claims for high fat with writing from his own books—Stef admitted in the pemmican recipes that Arctic caribou was too lean to make pemmican that supported ketosis. The most popular LCHF bloggers in Sweden, Andreas Eenfeldt/Diet Doctor and Annika Dahlquist have reluctantly agreed with Per’s findings—admitting that the Inuit were likely not ketogenic from their diet. I’ve put together a comprehensive review of the scientific literature regarding the Inuit, encompassing over two dozen studies, spanning 150 years, with references from explorers, including Stefansson. In the comments section of that post, Per gives a brief overview of how he was able to prove Stefansson’s observations on high fat intake were flawed. The post is a review of all the available literature that I could find (over two dozen studies). But, the literature certainly does not in any way support ketosis from the Inuit diet due to such high protein consumption. As Per (and Stefansson) points out, the caribou is too lean and as the many quotes show, the Inuit were saving their blubber and fat for the long dark Winter to power their oil lamps and heat their igloos. Again and again, we see that in the literature, as even Stefansson admits this. As far as glycogen is concerned, their glycogen intake is probably not worth scrutinizing given the well-documented high protein consumption in every published study. It really is besides the point. But, interest Continue reading >>

Conditions Shown To Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

Conditions Shown To Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

Obesity and heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer have something significant in common — they’re all rooted in insulin and leptin resistance By eating a high-quality fat, low-carbohydrate diet, you achieve nutritional ketosis; a metabolic state in which your body burns fat rather than glucose as its primary fuel. Maintaining nutritional ketosis may have health benefits in diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, MS, autism, migraines, traumatic brain injuries, polycystic ovary syndrome and much more By Dr. Mercola Obesity and top killers such as diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer's and cancer have something significant in common — they're all rooted in insulin and leptin resistance. In other words, the underlying problem is metabolic dysfunction that develops as a result of consuming too many net carbohydrates (total carbs minus fiber) and/or protein. Sugars found in processed foods and grains are the primary culprits, and the standard American diet is chockfull of both. Once you develop insulin and leptin resistance, it triggers biochemical cascades that not only make your body hold on to fat, but produce inflammation and cellular damage as well. Hence, whether you're struggling with weight and/or chronic health issues, the treatment protocols are the same. This is good news, as it significantly simplifies your approach to improving your health. You won't need a different set of strategies to address each condition. In short, by optimizing your metabolic and mitochondrial function, you set yourself squarely on the path to better health. So how do you correct these metabolic imbalances? Your diet is key. The timing of your meals can also play an important role. Nutritional Ketosis May Be Key for Optimal Health By e Continue reading >>

A Ketogenic Diet Can Cause A Fatty Liver

A Ketogenic Diet Can Cause A Fatty Liver

We were unable to load Disqus. If you are a moderator please see our troubleshooting guide. 7952 commentsComments Dr.BergCommunity Login Disqus Facebook Twitter Google 1 Recommend Recommended 2608 Discussion Recommended! Recommending means this is a discussion worth sharing. It gets shared to your followers' Disqus feeds, and gives the creator kudos! Find More Discussions Share Share this discussion on Twitter Facebook Sort by Newest Best Newest Oldest Join the discussion… in this conversation ⬇ Drag and drop your images here to upload them. Attach Log in with or sign up with Disqus or pick a name Disqus is a discussion network Disqus never moderates or censors. The rules on this community are its own. Don't be a jerk or do anything illegal. Everything is easier that way. Read full terms and conditions By signing up, you agree to the Disqus Basic Rules, Terms of Service, and Privacy Policy. By posting, you agree to the Disqus Basic Rules, Terms of Service, and Privacy Policy. ma • 6 hours ago Dr. Berg, this is probably about more than you think. Don't worry. Your actions will bring you what you deserve. I live in DC. I know you have been helping many people for many years. I suspect some of the truths that you say are threats to many industries, like the soy industry, and gmo products, etc. The food and drug industry do not want the truth about how they are causing illnesses, obesity etc and the Healthcare/insurance industry continues to exclude key tests that will prove millions of Americans have conditions like hypothyroidism which is caused by GMO foods. But, with your advice for natural healing you make big pharma uneccesary. The Oz team probably looked through your stuff and found something that would offend one of their partners. That is how the entertainmen Continue reading >>

More in ketosis