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Is Ketosis Bad For Liver

Is Dietary Ketosis Harmful To The Liver?

Is Dietary Ketosis Harmful To The Liver?

The mild dietary ketosis, such as that which is experienced during the Weight Loss phase of the Lean for Life program, is not harmful to individuals with a normal, healthy, functioning liver. Here is some information about ketosis that may help you to understand its role in weight loss: The carbohydrates you eat are converted to glucose, which is the body’s primary source of energy. Whenever your intake of carbohydrates is limited to a certain range, for a long enough period of time, you’ll reach a point where your body draws on its alternate energy system, fat stores, for fuel. This means your body burns fat and turns it into a source of fuel called ketones. (Ketones are produced whenever body fat is burned.) When you burn a larger amount of fat than is immediately needed for energy, the excess ketones are discarded in the urine. Being in ketosis means your body has burned a large amount of fat in response to the fact that it didn’t have sufficient glucose available for energy needs. Dietary ketosis is among the most misunderstood concepts in nutrition because it is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening condition most often associated with uncontrolled insulin-deficient Type 1 diabetes. In the Type 1 diabetic, the absence of insulin leads to a toxic build-up of blood glucose and an extreme break-down of fat and muscle tissue. This condition doesn’t occur in individuals who have even a small amount of insulin, whether from natural production or artificially administered. Dietary ketosis, however, is a natural adjustment to the body’s reduced intake of carbohydrates as the body shifts its primary source of energy from carbohydrates to stored fat. The presence of insulin keeps ketone production in check so that a mild, beneficial ketosis Continue reading >>

Is Spicy Food Bad For The Liver?

Is Spicy Food Bad For The Liver?

Everyone dreads liver problems. This is because the liver is one of the most vital organs of your body and any damage to it may have far reaching changes in your life. In fact, once the liver is damaged, it takes a long time to heal. You also have to maintain a very strict diet when you are suffering from liver problems. We know that spicy food is taboo when you are suffering from liver problems. However, you may not be sure whether liver diseases are caused by spicy food or not. We Indians are particularly used to spicy food. So if liver diseases are caused by spicy food indeed, then it is a very scary notion for almost all Indian. So let us find out if liver diseases happen due to spicy food or not. Spicy Or Oily Food? Most often, spicy foods and oily foods go with each other. When you are having a rich and spicy curry, it is more often than not quite oily as well. Oily food is definitely harmful for your liver. This is because it leads to the accumulation of fats on your liver. And a fatty liver is one of the main liver conditions that people suffer from. Healthy Spices Not all spices used to cook Indian food are harmful to your liver. For example, turmeric is an extremely healthy spice. Turmeric and ginger are two spices that protect your liver from damage. So it will be wrong to say that all spices have a damaging effect on your liver. Hot Chillies Some spices like red chillies and garam masala produce heat in the body. That is why they are unhealthy. Besides, if you have liver problems, these spices are difficult to digest. However, just by themselves these spices do not cause any damage to the liver. But if you are already suffering from a liver related disease like jaundice, you should avoid these spices. Moderate Spices While we say that some Indian spices are Continue reading >>

Is Going In And Out Of Ketosis Bad For Cholesterol Levels Or Organs?

Is Going In And Out Of Ketosis Bad For Cholesterol Levels Or Organs?

I would be a bit cautious about “going in and out” - not because it’s bad or because it’s hard to do. Rather, because if you go “in and out continuously” - I’m hoping that you say that as supported by actual measurements and not just the mere fact that you don’t eat carbs for a day and then binge the next day - and then the cycle repeats. Although your body utilizes ketones on a continuous basis, the onset of “ketosis” per se, requires some adaptation period and a relatively substantial depletion of glycogen. You need to allow some time for this to happen - if you change your eating pattern too quickly (and if you didn’t specifically do anything to deplete your glycogen reserves, such as heavy-weight exercise, etc.) - you might not even get into ketosis before, allegedly, getting out of it. Of course, those could be just my assumptions - but, generally, I would say you have to follow ketogenic diet for at least 2–3 days to actually slip into ketosis, while you may only need a couple of hours to get out of it, if you overindulge in carbs. Other than the frequency of those changes - getting in and out by itself is not an issue and, actually, may be preferred (unless you have specific medical conditions that require you to be in ketosis for a long time). Now, to address cholesterol - cholesterol is generally not an issue by itself (read: Dietary Cholesterol Redeemed). It’s only in combination with other pro-inflammatory compounds and other detrimental effects of an unhealthy lifestyle that it may become an issue and contribute to heart disease. In reality, cholesterol is an “indicator” of a problem, not the cause for it. Conversely, none of your cells would be able to function properly - but that’s a topic of a different discussion. Your org Continue reading >>

Is It Bad For The Body To Jump Between Ketosis And Glucose?

Is It Bad For The Body To Jump Between Ketosis And Glucose?

I would not use that particular cycle, but think it would be hard to make a scientific argument that the occasional indulgence is “bad” - at least after the initial adaptation period. I’d do 4 weeks on, then maybe a meal/day or two off. That’s what we initially committed to. However, we wound up not wanting to do that indulgence we had scheduled for a few months. Then when we did, felt pretty terrible. We often will “relax” the diet when we travel, but it’s not really great-feeling. It gets a lot easier to transition back and forth as you get some practice at it, and some would say that doing it cyclically (seasonally) is more similar to what would have happened in primitive man (carbs were only available to most cultures for part of the year). But YMMV. Continue reading >>

Is Splenda (sucralose) Bad For Your Liver?

Is Splenda (sucralose) Bad For Your Liver?

I asked this question of the nutritionist during cardiac rehab and received a definite 'no'. The answer lies out there somewhere in the convoluted world of current medical opinion. I have read scholarly dissertations to the contrary, but like almost all things medical it seems like the winds of change are always blowing. Good today bad tomorrow. Like the most current proposition that dietary fat does not contribute to high cholesterol levels in the blood. I heard this also during rehab, yet they insisted that I limit my saturated fat intake to a maximum of 10mg per day. Take it from one who is trying to not have a repeat multiple bypass procedure, that's a lot more vegetables and not much else. By the way, we in our family intake NO Aspartame. Read labels carefully as they are not so proud of it anymore. And yes, Splenda is not Aspartame. Continue reading >>

Is Nutritional Ketosis Bad For A 16 Year Old?

Is Nutritional Ketosis Bad For A 16 Year Old?

I love what nutritional ketosis does for me, but I would not recommend my 16 year old self to undertake it. There are a few reasons. The biggest one is that at that age, I really didn't understand my body well at all. I had little awareness of hunger vs thirst, good pain vs bad pain from working out, and determining what my personal physical and mental limits were. Please don't misunderstand, I'm not saying "you're a silly teenager who knows nothing". Not at all! However, it is really important to be aware of yourself when undertaking any dramatic eating regimen, and having the benefit of living with yourself and making decisions for yourself for 20+ years vs 6+ years makes a huge difference in your success. It's easy to fall into bad habits on ketosis, like relying too heavily on dairy to get your fat macros (I'll just add more butter) instead of eating a balanced diet with adequate nutrients for your growing body. Will power, do you have it? Most teenagers are eating and enjoying all kinds of foods that simply aren't permissible on ketosis. Chips, pop, pizza, burritos, pasta, ice cream, and even some "healthy" snacks like carrot sticks, Gatorade, and watermelon are no-nos. You might develop an (eating) disorder because these are formative years and what you put in your mouth impacts your body and mind. It's easy to think of ketosis as a quick fix with minimal effort, and far better to develop a healthy relationship with food AND exercise to achieve your body goals. Continue reading >>

Is Wine Bad For Our Liver?

Is Wine Bad For Our Liver?

My answer to this question relates to 'alcohol'-related potential harm to the liver, and not specifically related to wine. Wine typically contains between 12-14% alcohol, which is different to that of beer or spirits. Regular light to moderate alcohol drinking generally does not significantly affect or change liver function. Continuous heavy or excessive alcohol drinking, typically for more than 10 years does, however, produce significant changes in liver function, which are related to the capacity of the liver to breakdown alcohol and other foods and drugs. In general, the amount and pattern of alcohol consumed determines the risk and degree of liver damage, although the amount of alcohol it takes to damage the liver varies greatly among individuals, which may reflect gender, genetic and socio-economic differences (Cichoz-Lach et al. 2006a, 2006b, 2007, Stokkeland et al. 2008). It has been suggested that binge drinking, for example, is less associated with the development of alcoholic liver cirrhosis than regular heavy or excessive alcohol drinking (Stokkeland et al. 2008, Hatton et al. 2009). Basically, however, the more you drink, the greater the risk of liver damage (Rehm et al. 2010). For more information, check out the AWRI's information sheet on alcohol and liver: The saying “all good things in moderation” comes to mind and, while being a bit cliche, does apply to the matter at hand. A glass or two shouldn’t be a problem (relative to portion and body mass). Wine has some beneficial properties. This is the case for an individual with a healthy liver. If one has a condition that affects the liver’s performance in reducing toxins in the bloodstream such as cirrhosis or hepatic encephalopathy then alcohol should be avoided as per doctor recommendation. Wine c Continue reading >>

Does Herbalife Cause Liver Damage?

Does Herbalife Cause Liver Damage?

No, it does not. It is estimated that Herbalife has almost 8 million customers in the US alone, and probably 40 million customers worldwide. These are recent customers. But Herbalife has been in business for 36 years! Now about liver damage… There has been reported a total of 51 cases of possible liver damage due to use of weight-loss products WORLDWIDE from 1998 to 2008. (Source:Report of the Scientific Committee of the Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition (AESAN) on a metabolic hypothesis relating to the hepatoxicity associated with consumption of certain food supplements and food products for particular nutritional uses related to weight-control diets). The report does not specify that all cases are Herbalife products, but we know some of them are, so let’s assume that all of them are. I think that it is quite safe to also assume that there were about 100 million of people using Herbalife products from 1998 to 2008. That makes a 0,00005% probability of getting liver damage serious enough to be reported. And you can also analyze it as an average of five cases per year. Just to compare, it is said that 150 people die each year because a coconut falling from a palm tree hit them in the head. So you have thirty times more chance to die from a killer coconut than getting liver damage from Herbalife products ;-) The Scientific Committee of the Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition reports “impossibility to attribute a cause-effect relationship between the consumption of food supplements and food products for particular nutritional uses in relation to weight-control diets per se and the liver damage found in those exposed to these products. There seems to be no link between the hepatic anomalies noted and the consumption of a specific product. The adver Continue reading >>

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