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Is Ketone Basic?

Basic Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Basic Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Hello Steemians , Today I want share about aldehyde and ketone because my lil brother ask about it. This is just the basic information based on my understanding. I will post about the properties, synthesis and the chemical reaction later because i am so busy right now. I hope you guys like it. STRUCTURE IUPAC names for aldehyde: R -- CHO The -e ending of the alkane replaced by --al For naming them, select from the longest chain of carbon atom with the -CHO group. Because aldehyde must be on the carbon number 1 so there is no need to give it number. Similar for alkene Example: For a cyclic molecule, which is -CHO is bonded to the ring, we should add the suffix -carbaldehyde for example: And Then For .... Ketone IUPAC Nomenclature -For ketone we change the -e to -one -The rule of naming the ketone is same like aldehyde which is calculating the number of chain from the double bond -o -For example: Thank you for reading. I am newbie in this writting stuff and I will make it better next time. I hope someone can teach me how to write good article/note better in the future. Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

Excess ketones are dangerous for someone with diabetes... Low insulin, combined with relatively normal glucagon and epinephrine levels, causes fat to be released from fat cells, which then turns into ketones. Excess formation of ketones is dangerous and is a medical emergency In a person without diabetes, ketone production is the body’s normal adaptation to starvation. Blood sugar levels never get too high, because the production is regulated by just the right balance of insulin, glucagon and other hormones. However, in an individual with diabetes, dangerous and life-threatening levels of ketones can develop. What are ketones and why do I need to know about them? Ketones and ketoacids are alternative fuels for the body that are made when glucose is in short supply. They are made in the liver from the breakdown of fats. Ketones are formed when there is not enough sugar or glucose to supply the body’s fuel needs. This occurs overnight, and during dieting or fasting. During these periods, insulin levels are low, but glucagon and epinephrine levels are relatively normal. This combination of low insulin, and relatively normal glucagon and epinephrine levels causes fat to be released from the fat cells. The fats travel through the blood circulation to reach the liver where they are processed into ketone units. The ketone units then circulate back into the blood stream and are picked up by the muscle and other tissues to fuel your body’s metabolism. In a person without diabetes, ketone production is the body’s normal adaptation to starvation. Blood sugar levels never get too high, because the production is regulated by just the right balance of insulin, glucagon and other hormones. However, in an individual with diabetes, dangerous and life-threatening levels of ketone Continue reading >>

Reactions Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Reactions Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Aldehydes and ketones undergo a variety of reactions that lead to many different products. The most common reactions are nucleophilic addition reactions, which lead to the formation of alcohols, alkenes, diols, cyanohydrins (RCH(OH)C&tbond;N), and imines R 2C&dbond;NR), to mention a few representative examples. The main reactions of the carbonyl group are nucleophilic additions to the carbon‐oxygen double bond. As shown below, this addition consists of adding a nucleophile and a hydrogen across the carbon‐oxygen double bond. Due to differences in electronegativities, the carbonyl group is polarized. The carbon atom has a partial positive charge, and the oxygen atom has a partially negative charge. Aldehydes are usually more reactive toward nucleophilic substitutions than ketones because of both steric and electronic effects. In aldehydes, the relatively small hydrogen atom is attached to one side of the carbonyl group, while a larger R group is affixed to the other side. In ketones, however, R groups are attached to both sides of the carbonyl group. Thus, steric hindrance is less in aldehydes than in ketones. Electronically, aldehydes have only one R group to supply electrons toward the partially positive carbonyl carbon, while ketones have two electron‐supplying groups attached to the carbonyl carbon. The greater amount of electrons being supplied to the carbonyl carbon, the less the partial positive charge on this atom and the weaker it will become as a nucleus. The addition of water to an aldehyde results in the formation of a hydrate. The formation of a hydrate proceeds via a nucleophilic addition mechanism. 1. Water, acting as a nucleophile, is attracted to the partially positive carbon of the carbonyl group, generating an oxonium ion. Acetal formation reacti Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Response To Sglt2 Inhibitors: Basic Mechanisms And Therapeutic Perspectives.

Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Response To Sglt2 Inhibitors: Basic Mechanisms And Therapeutic Perspectives.

Abstract Inhibitors of the sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT2 are a new class of antihyperglycemic drugs that have been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These drugs inhibit glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubules of the kidney thereby enhancing glucosuria and lowering blood glucose levels. Additional consequences and benefits include a reduction in body weight, uric acid levels, and blood pressure. Moreover, SGLT2 inhibition can have protective effects on the kidney and cardiovascular system in patients with T2DM and high cardiovascular risk. However, a potential side effect that has been reported with SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with T2DM and particularly during off-label use in patients with type 1 diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis. The US Food and Drug Administration recently warned that SGLT2 inhibitors may result in euglycemic ketoacidosis. Here, we review the basic metabolism of ketone bodies, the triggers of diabetic ketoacidosis, and potential mechanisms by which SGLT2 inhibitors may facilitate the development of ketosis or ketoacidosis. This provides the rationale for measures to lower the risk. We discuss the role of the kidney and potential links to renal gluconeogenesis and uric acid handling. Moreover, we outline potential beneficial effects of modestly elevated ketone body levels on organ function that may have therapeutic relevance for the observed beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibitors on the kidney and cardiovascular system. KEYWORDS: diabetic ketoacidosis; ketogenesis; ketone body reabsorption; ketosis; kidney; sodium glucose cotransporter Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

What is a Keto Diet? A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that it will be chosen over any other energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, we produce ketones, which are produced from the breakdown of fats in the liver. The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories but starvation of carbohydrates. Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits. Make keto simple and easy by checking out our 30 Day Meal Plan. Get meal plans, shopping lists, and much more with our Keto Academy Program. Looking for Something Specific? There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical appl Continue reading >>

Organic Chemistry/ketones And Aldehydes

Organic Chemistry/ketones And Aldehydes

Aldehydes () and ketones () are both carbonyl compounds. They are organic compounds in which the carbonyl carbon is connected to C or H atoms on either side. An aldehyde has one or both vacancies of the carbonyl carbon satisfied by a H atom, while a ketone has both its vacancies satisfied by carbon. 3 Preparing Aldehydes and Ketones Ketones are named by replacing the -e in the alkane name with -one. The carbon chain is numbered so that the ketone carbon, called the carbonyl group, gets the lowest number. For example, would be named 2-butanone because the root structure is butane and the ketone group is on the number two carbon. Alternatively, functional class nomenclature of ketones is also recognized by IUPAC, which is done by naming the substituents attached to the carbonyl group in alphabetical order, ending with the word ketone. The above example of 2-butanone can also be named ethyl methyl ketone using this method. If two ketone groups are on the same structure, the ending -dione would be added to the alkane name, such as heptane-2,5-dione. Aldehydes replace the -e ending of an alkane with -al for an aldehyde. Since an aldehyde is always at the carbon that is numbered one, a number designation is not needed. For example, the aldehyde of pentane would simply be pentanal. The -CH=O group of aldehydes is known as a formyl group. When a formyl group is attached to a ring, the ring name is followed by the suffix "carbaldehyde". For example, a hexane ring with a formyl group is named cyclohexanecarbaldehyde. Aldehyde and ketone polarity is characterized by the high dipole moments of their carbonyl group, which makes them rather polar molecules. They are more polar than alkenes and ethers, though because they lack hydrogen, they cannot participate in hydrogen bonding like Continue reading >>

Naming Ketones

Naming Ketones

Ketones are organic chemical compounds that include a -carbonyl group (i.e. an oxygen atom attached to a carbon atom by a double covalent bond) such that the carbon atom to which the -carbonyl group is attached is itself attached to two other carbon atoms - as opposed to one other carbon atom and one hydrogen atom, which the case for aldehydes That is, ketones are a class or category of organic chemical compounds that include a carbon atom attached to both an oxygen atom (by a double covalent bond), and also to two other carbon atoms (by a single covalent bond in each case). Bearing in mind that carbon atoms form a total of 4 single covalent bonds - or equivalent in combinations of double or triple bonds, a carbon atom attached to both an oxygen atom (by a double covalent bond) and also to two other carbon atoms (by a single covalent bond in each case) cannot be the first- or last - (which are equivalent positions) carbon atom in the chain of carbon atoms that form the organic molecule of which it is a part. This position of the -carbonyl group (oxygen atom) attached to a carbon atom that is not the last carbon atom in a carbon-chain is important because it distinguishes ketones from a similar category of organic compounds, called aldehydes. In contrast to ketones, aldehydes include a -carbonyl group attached to the end-carbon in a carbon-chain. Ketone molecules can vary in size up to very long molecules most of which consist of carbon atoms attached to each other and also to hydrogen atoms. Continue reading >>

An Inert Hydrocarbon Skeleton Onto Which Functional Groups (fgs) Are Attached Or Superimposed.

An Inert Hydrocarbon Skeleton Onto Which Functional Groups (fgs) Are Attached Or Superimposed.

Organic Functional Groups: Aldehydes, ketones, primary alcohols, etc. (Indonesian Translation of this page) Organic chemistry is dominated by the "functional group approach", where organic molecules are deemed to be constructed from: The functional group approach "works" because the properties and reaction chemistry of a particular functional group (FG) can be remarkably independent of environment. Therefore, it is only necessary to know about the chemistry of a few generic functions in order to predict the chemical behaviour of thousands of real organic chemicals. Organic molecules are also named using the functional group approach: 2-hexanone 2-hexanol 2-chlorohexane The rule is that functions assume their distinct identity when separated by –CH2– groups. Thus, the carbonyl, C=O, and hydroxy, OH, of a carboxylic acid, RCOOH, are part of a single function and are NOT "alcohol-plus-ketone": A Couple of Words About The Functional Group Approach The functional group approach is 100% empirical in that it is determined by experiment and experience, and not by theory (unlike VSEPR, for example.) A multifunctional entity like the drug molecule morphine has several functional groups and chiral centres: Professional chemists consider large multifunctional organic molecules in terms of 'substructures' rather than functional groups. Ring systems, for example, are better considered as substructures, although the dividing line can be fuzzy... What You Need To Know To be proficient in organic chemistry at university entrance level [ie, American AP, British A-Level or French Baccalaureate] exam systems, in other words be able to: name organic molecules predict solubility in different types of solvent predict chemical reactivity predict spectra it is absolutely essential to be abl Continue reading >>

1. Nomenclature Of Aldehydes And Ketones

1. Nomenclature Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Aldehydes and ketones are organic compounds which incorporate a carbonyl functional group, C=O. The carbon atom of this group has two remaining bonds that may be occupied by hydrogen or alkyl or aryl substituents. If at least one of these substituents is hydrogen, the compound is an aldehyde. If neither is hydrogen, the compound is a ketone. The IUPAC system of nomenclature assigns a characteristic suffix to these classes, al to aldehydes and one to ketones. For example, H2C=O is methanal, more commonly called formaldehyde. Since an aldehyde carbonyl group must always lie at the end of a carbon chain, it is by default position #1, and therefore defines the numbering direction. A ketone carbonyl function may be located anywhere within a chain or ring, and its position is given by a locator number. Chain numbering normally starts from the end nearest the carbonyl group. In cyclic ketones the carbonyl group is assigned position #1, and this number is not cited in the name, unless more than one carbonyl group is present. If you are uncertain about the IUPAC rules for nomenclature you should review them now. Examples of IUPAC names are provided (in blue) in the following diagram. Common names are in red, and derived names in black. In common names carbon atoms near the carbonyl group are often designated by Greek letters. The atom adjacent to the function is alpha, the next removed is beta and so on. Since ketones have two sets of neighboring atoms, one set is labeled α, β etc., and the other α', β' etc. Very simple ketones, such as propanone and phenylethanone (first two examples in the right column), do not require a locator number, since there is only one possible site for a ketone carbonyl function. Likewise, locator numbers are omitted for the simple dialdehyde at t Continue reading >>

Why Are Aldehydes And Ketones Neutral And Not Acidic/basic?

Why Are Aldehydes And Ketones Neutral And Not Acidic/basic?

This question is quite general, and as other answers have pointed out, depends on what you mean by acidic/basic. The other answers have already covered the Lewis bit, so I will focus a bit more on the Bronsted-Lowry and Arrhenius definitions. In water, almost all aldehydes and ketones do not dissociate to give the H+ or OH- ion, which is the Arrhenius definition. However, the alpha position of acetylacetone is considered acidic by the Bronsted-Lowry definition, and can be deprotonated by strong bases to give the conjugated enone after tautomerism. This is due to the stability of the conjugate base. Continue reading >>

Functional Group Names, Properties, And Reactions

Functional Group Names, Properties, And Reactions

Functional Groups Functional groups refer to specific atoms bonded in a certain arrangement that give a compound certain physical and chemical properties. Learning Objectives Define the term “functional group” as it applies to organic molecules Key Takeaways Functional groups are often used to “functionalize” a compound, affording it different physical and chemical properties than it would have in its original form. Functional groups will undergo the same type of reactions regardless of the compound of which they are a part; however, the presence of certain functional groups within close proximity can limit reactivity. Functional groups can be used to distinguish similar compounds from each other. functional group: A specific grouping of elements that is characteristic of a class of compounds, and determines some properties and reactions of that class. functionalization: Addition of specific functional groups to afford the compound new, desirable properties. The Role of Functional Groups In organic chemistry, a functional group is a specific group of atoms or bonds within a compound that is responsible for the characteristic chemical reactions of that compound. The same functional group will behave in a similar fashion, by undergoing similar reactions, regardless of the compound of which it is a part. Functional groups also play an important part in organic compound nomenclature; combining the names of the functional groups with the names of the parent alkanes provides a way to distinguish compounds. The atoms of a functional group are linked together and to the rest of the compound by covalent bonds. The first carbon atom that attaches to the functional group is referred to as the alpha carbon; the second, the beta carbon; the third, the gamma carbon, etc. Simi Continue reading >>

Introducing Aldehydes And Ketones

Introducing Aldehydes And Ketones

This page explains what aldehydes and ketones are, and looks at the way their bonding affects their reactivity. It also considers their simple physical properties such as solubility and boiling points. Details of the chemical reactions of aldehydes and ketones are described on separate pages. What are aldehydes and ketones? Aldehydes and ketones as carbonyl compounds Aldehydes and ketones are simple compounds which contain a carbonyl group - a carbon-oxygen double bond. They are simple in the sense that they don't have other reactive groups like -OH or -Cl attached directly to the carbon atom in the carbonyl group - as you might find, for example, in carboxylic acids containing -COOH. Examples of aldehydes In aldehydes, the carbonyl group has a hydrogen atom attached to it together with either a second hydrogen atom or, more commonly, a hydrocarbon group which might be an alkyl group or one containing a benzene ring. For the purposes of this section, we shall ignore those containing benzene rings. Note: There is no very significant reason for this. It is just that if you are fairly new to organic chemistry you might not have come across any compounds with benzene rings in them yet. I'm just trying to avoid adding to your confusion! Notice that these all have exactly the same end to the molecule. All that differs is the complexity of the other group attached. When you are writing formulae for these, the aldehyde group (the carbonyl group with the hydrogen atom attached) is always written as -CHO - never as COH. That could easily be confused with an alcohol. Ethanal, for example, is written as CH3CHO; methanal as HCHO. The name counts the total number of carbon atoms in the longest chain - including the one in the carbonyl group. If you have side groups attached to the ch Continue reading >>

Addition Of Water To Form Hydrates (gem-diols)

Addition Of Water To Form Hydrates (gem-diols)

It has been demonstrated that water, in the presence of an acid or a base, adds rapidly to the carbonyl function of aldehydes and ketones establishing a reversible equilibrium with a hydrate (geminal-diol or gem-diol). The word germinal or gem comes from the Latin word for twin, geminus. Going from Reactants to Products Simplified Reversibility of the Reaction Isolation of gem-diols is difficult because the reaction is reversibly. Removal of the water during a reaction can cause the conversion of a gem-diol back to the corresponding carbonyl. In most cases the resulting gem-diol is unstable relative to the reactants and cannot be isolated. Exceptions to this rule exist, one being formaldehyde where the weaker pi-component of the carbonyl double bond, relative to other aldehydes or ketones, and the small size of the hydrogen substituents favor addition. Thus, a solution of formaldehyde in water (formalin) is almost exclusively the hydrate, or polymers of the hydrate. The addition of electron donating alkyl groups stabilized the partial positive charge on the carbonyl carbon and decreases the amount of gem-diol product at equilibrium. Because of this ketones tend to form less than 1% of the hydrate at equilibrium. Likewise, the addition of strong electron-withdrawing groups destabilizes the carbonyl and tends to form stable gem-diols. Two examples of this are chloral, and 1,2,3-indantrione. It should be noted that chloral hydrate is a sedative and has been added to alcoholic beverages to make a “Knock-out” drink also called a Mickey Finn. Also, ninhydrin is commonly used by forensic investigators to resolve finger prints. The mechanism is catalyzed by the addition of an acid or base. Note! This may speed up the reaction but is has not effect on the equilibriums discus Continue reading >>

What Is Ketone? - Definition, Structure, Formation & Formula

What Is Ketone? - Definition, Structure, Formation & Formula

Background of Ketone Did you know that our friend aldehyde has a very close relative named ketone? By definition, a ketone is an organic compound that contains a carbonyl functional group. So you may be wondering if aldehydes and ketones are relatives, what makes them different? Well, I am glad you asked because all you have to remember is this little guy: hydrogen. While aldehyde contains a hydrogen atom connected to its carbonyl group, ketone does not have a hydrogen atom attached. There are a few ways to know you are encountering a ketone. The first is by looking at the ending of the chemical word. If the suffix ending of the chemical name is '-one,' then you can be sure there is a ketone present in that compound. Want to know another way to tell if a ketone is lurking around the corner? By its physical property. Ketones have high boiling points and love water (high water solubility). Let's dig a little deeper with the physical property of a ketone. The oxygen in a ketone absolutely loves to take all the electrons it can get its hands on. But, by being an electron-hogger, oxygen's refusal to share creates a sticky situation where some atoms on the ketone have more or less charge than others. In chemistry, an electron-hogging atom is referred to as being electronegative. An electronegative atom is more attractive to other compounds. This attractiveness, called polarity, is what contributes to ketones' physical properties. Structure & Formula Ketones have a very distinct look to them; you can't miss it if you see them. As shown in Diagram 1, there are two R groups attached to the carbonyl group (C=O). Those R groups can be any type of compound that contains a carbon molecule. An example of how the R group determines ketone type is illustrated in this diagram here. The Continue reading >>

Ketone

Ketone

Not to be confused with ketone bodies. Ketone group Acetone In chemistry, a ketone (alkanone) /ˈkiːtoʊn/ is an organic compound with the structure RC(=O)R', where R and R' can be a variety of carbon-containing substituents. Ketones and aldehydes are simple compounds that contain a carbonyl group (a carbon-oxygen double bond). They are considered "simple" because they do not have reactive groups like −OH or −Cl attached directly to the carbon atom in the carbonyl group, as in carboxylic acids containing −COOH.[1] Many ketones are known and many are of great importance in industry and in biology. Examples include many sugars (ketoses) and the industrial solvent acetone, which is the smallest ketone. Nomenclature and etymology[edit] The word ketone is derived from Aketon, an old German word for acetone.[2][3] According to the rules of IUPAC nomenclature, ketones are named by changing the suffix -ane of the parent alkane to -anone. The position of the carbonyl group is usually denoted by a number. For the most important ketones, however, traditional nonsystematic names are still generally used, for example acetone and benzophenone. These nonsystematic names are considered retained IUPAC names,[4] although some introductory chemistry textbooks use systematic names such as "2-propanone" or "propan-2-one" for the simplest ketone (CH3−CO−CH3) instead of "acetone". The common names of ketones are obtained by writing separately the names of the two alkyl groups attached to the carbonyl group, followed by "ketone" as a separate word. The names of the alkyl groups are written alphabetically. When the two alkyl groups are the same, the prefix di- is added before the name of alkyl group. The positions of other groups are indicated by Greek letters, the α-carbon being th Continue reading >>

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