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Is Ketoacidosis The Same As Lactic Acidosis

Prevalence And Significance Of Lactic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Prevalence And Significance Of Lactic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Abstract PURPOSE: The prevalence and clinical significance of lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are understudied. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of lactic acidosis in DKA and its association with intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS) and mortality. METHODS: Retrospective, observational study of patients with DKA presenting to the emergency department of an urban tertiary care hospital between January 2004 and June 2008. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients with DKA who presented to the emergency department were included in the analysis. Of 68 patients, 46 (68%) had lactic acidosis (lactate, >2.5 mmol/L), and 27 (40%) of 68 had a high lactate (>4 mmol/L). The median lactate was 3.5 mmol/L (interquartile range, 3.32-4.12). There was no association between lactate and ICU LOS in a multivariable model controlling for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, glucose, and creatinine. Lactate correlated negatively with blood pressure (r = -0.44; P < .001) and positively with glucose (r = 0.34; P = .004). CONCLUSIONS: Lactic acidosis is more common in DKA than traditionally appreciated and is not associated with increased ICU LOS or mortality. The positive correlation of lactate with glucose raises the possibility that lactic acidosis in DKA may be due not only to hypoperfusion but also to altered glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic acidosis is a medical condition characterized by the buildup of lactate (especially L-lactate) in the body, which results in an excessively low pH in the bloodstream. It is a form of metabolic acidosis, in which excessive acid accumulates due to a problem with the body's metabolism of lactic acid. Lactic acidosis is typically the result of an underlying acute or chronic medical condition, medication, or poisoning. The symptoms are generally attributable to these underlying causes, but may include nausea, vomiting, rapid deep breathing, and generalised weakness. The diagnosis is made on biochemical analysis of blood (often initially on arterial blood gas samples), and once confirmed, generally prompts an investigation to establish the underlying cause to treat the acidosis. In some situations, hemofiltration (purification of the blood) is temporarily required. In rare chronic forms of lactic acidosis caused by mitochondrial disease, a specific diet or dichloroacetate may be used. The prognosis of lactic acidosis depends largely on the underlying cause; in some situations (such as severe infections), it indicates an increased risk of death. Classification[edit] The Cohen-Woods classification categorizes causes of lactic acidosis as:[1] Type A: Decreased tissue oxygenation (e.g., from decreased blood flow) Type B B1: Underlying diseases (sometimes causing type A) B2: Medication or intoxication B3: Inborn error of metabolism Signs and symptoms[edit] Lactic acidosis is commonly found in people who are unwell, such as those with severe heart and/or lung disease, a severe infection with sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to another cause, severe physical trauma, or severe depletion of body fluids.[2] Symptoms in humans include all those of typical m Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis that begins in the kidneys. People with lactic acidosis have kidneys that are unable to remove excess acid from their body. If lactic acid builds up in the body more quickly than it can be removed, acidity levels in bodily fluids — such as blood — spike. This buildup of acid causes an imbalance in the body’s pH level, which should always be slightly alkaline instead of acidic. There are a few different types of acidosis. Lactic acid buildup occurs when there’s not enough oxygen in the muscles to break down glucose and glycogen. This is called anaerobic metabolism. There are two types of lactic acid: L-lactate and D-lactate. Most forms of lactic acidosis are caused by too much L-lactate. Lactic acidosis has many causes and can often be treated. But if left untreated, it may be life-threatening. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are typical of many health issues. If you experience any of these symptoms, you should contact your doctor immediately. Your doctor can help determine the root cause. Several symptoms of lactic acidosis represent a medical emergency: fruity-smelling breath (a possible indication of a serious complication of diabetes, called ketoacidosis) confusion jaundice (yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes) trouble breathing or shallow, rapid breathing If you know or suspect that you have lactic acidosis and have any of these symptoms, call 911 or go to an emergency room right away. Other lactic acidosis symptoms include: exhaustion or extreme fatigue muscle cramps or pain body weakness overall feelings of physical discomfort abdominal pain or discomfort diarrhea decrease in appetite headache rapid heart rate Lactic acidosis has a wide range of underlying causes, including carbon monoxide poisoni Continue reading >>

What Is The Biology Of A Hangover?

What Is The Biology Of A Hangover?

Alcohol blocks the release of vasopressin which is a hormone that makes you retain water. In terms of the science of how it does this, it directly blocks the release from the neurohypophyseal nerve terminals.[1] In other words, if you try to electrically stimulate those nerves to get them to release vasopressin and you have alcohol around, that release will be inhibited. The reduction in vasopressin causes water loss from your body. studies have shown that drinking about 250 milliliters of alcohol causes the body to expel nearly four times as much liquid in waste.[8] This diuretic effect decreases as the alcohol in the bloodstream decreases, but the aftereffects help create a hangover.[2] The next morning, you have less water and electrolytes than you need to have, and that causes headaches and other problems. Headaches result from dehydration because the body's organs try to make up for their own water loss by stealing water from the brain, causing the brain to decrease in size and pull on the membranes that connect the brain to the skull, resulting in pain. The frequent urination also expels salts and potassium that are necessary for proper nerve and muscle function; when sodium and potassium levels get too low, headaches, fatigue and nausea can result.[2] Alcohol can also cause you to feel sluggish because of its effects on your liver and glycogen levels. Alcohol also breaks down the body's store of glycogen in the liver, turning the chemical into glucose and sending it out of the body in the urine. Lack of this key energy source is partly responsible for the weakness, fatigue and lack of coordination the next morning. [2] There are so called congeners in alcohol. Congener as a word on its own refers to a minor chemical constituent.[3] In the case of alcohol these mi Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis In Diabetes*

Lactic Acidosis In Diabetes*

Abstract Lactic acidosis is occasionally responsible for metabolic acidosis in diabetics. It may occur in the presence of normal blood levels of the ketone bodies, and such cases are often described as having “non-ketotic diabetic acidosis.” Lactic acid may contribute to the metabolic acidosis in patients with true diabetic ketoacidosis, but the blood lactate concentrations in these patients are not usually very high. In some patients the ketoacidosis is replaced by a lactic acidosis during treatment. This usually occurs in association with a serious underlying disorder and is associated with a poor prognosis. A transient increase in blood lactate concentration was in fact observed in most patients after the beginning of treatment, but the significance of this finding is uncertain. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (930K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References. These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Continue reading >>

What Chemical Processes Or Reactions Contribute To Metabolic Acidosis?

What Chemical Processes Or Reactions Contribute To Metabolic Acidosis?

There are three primary states metabolic acidosis. Their underlying physiological causes are from diabetes (ketoacidosis), normal anion gap acidosis from ailments such as kidney malfunction (renal tubular acidosis or more specifically hyperchloremic acidosis), and rare congenital mitochondrial disorders (lactic acidosis). More common causes of metabolic acidosis may come from liver disease or damage or from the ingestion of certain anti-retroviral drugs and poisons such as arsenic. In ketoacidosis, the body does not have enough insulin which allows glucose to be transported across the cell membranes. The body's response is to try to compensate for the supposed lack of energy source (starvation defense, even though there is plenty in the blood) by digesting fat which is converted by the liver into alternative energy sources, i.e. ketones such as acetoacetate and the carboxylic acid β-hydroxybutyrate. These byproducts are acidic and lower the pH of the blood. In renal tubular acidosis (RTA) the kidneys are not acidifying the urine as efficiently as they should which allows acid in the blood to accumulate. RTA is a normal anion gap acidosis during which the alpha intercalated cells fail to secret acid. This can be caused by toxin damage from toluene or lithium carbonate among others, or by mutations. Two well known genetic causes of RTA are a mutation in the anion exchanger AE1 (Band 3) transport protein that controls chloride and bicarbonate exchange across the plasma membrane, and mutations to the apical proton pump vH+-ATPase. A reduction in plasma bicarb concentration and increased chloride prevents pH buffering and reduces the pH. Lesser known mutations that have the same effect are in the family of serine-threonine protein kinases WNK1 or WNK4, specifically, the min Continue reading >>

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION Lactate levels greater than 2 mmol/L represent hyperlactatemia, whereas lactic acidosis is generally defined as a serum lactate concentration above 4 mmol/L. Lactic acidosis is the most common cause of metabolic acidosis in hospitalized patients. Although the acidosis is usually associated with an elevated anion gap, moderately increased lactate levels can be observed with a normal anion gap (especially if hypoalbuminemia exists and the anion gap is not appropriately corrected). When lactic acidosis exists as an isolated acid-base disturbance, the arterial pH is reduced. However, other coexisting disorders can raise the pH into the normal range or even generate an elevated pH. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis", section on 'Assessment of the serum anion gap' and "Simple and mixed acid-base disorders".) Lactic acidosis occurs when lactic acid production exceeds lactic acid clearance. The increase in lactate production is usually caused by impaired tissue oxygenation, either from decreased oxygen delivery or a defect in mitochondrial oxygen utilization. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis".) The pathophysiology and causes of lactic acidosis will be reviewed here. The possible role of bicarbonate therapy in such patients is discussed separately. (See "Bicarbonate therapy in lactic acidosis".) PATHOPHYSIOLOGY A review of the biochemistry of lactate generation and metabolism is important in understanding the pathogenesis of lactic acidosis [1]. Both overproduction and reduced metabolism of lactate appear to be operative in most patients. Cellular lactate generation is influenced by the "redox state" of the cell. The redox state in the cellular cytoplasm is reflected by the ratio of oxidized and reduced nicotine ad Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemic Crises And Lactic Acidosis In Diabetes Mellitus

Hyperglycaemic Crises And Lactic Acidosis In Diabetes Mellitus

Hyperglycaemic crises are discussed together followed by a separate section on lactic acidosis. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS (DKA) AND HYPERGLYCAEMIC HYPEROSMOLAR STATE (HHS) Definitions DKA has no universally agreed definition. Alberti proposed the working definition of “severe uncontrolled diabetes requiring emergency treatment with insulin and intravenous fluids and with a blood ketone body concentration of >5 mmol/l”.1 Given the limited availability of blood ketone body assays, a more pragmatic definition comprising a metabolic acidosis (pH <7.3), plasma bicarbonate <15 mmol/l, plasma glucose >13.9 mmol/l, and urine ketostix reaction ++ or plasma ketostix ⩾ + may be more workable in clinical practice.2 Classifying the severity of diabetic ketoacidosis is desirable, since it may assist in determining the management and monitoring of the patient. Such a classification is based on the severity of acidosis (table 1). A caveat to this approach is that the presence of an intercurrent illness, that may not necessarily affect the level of acidosis, may markedly affect outcome: a recent study showed that the two most important factors predicting mortality in DKA were severe intercurrent illness and pH <7.0.3 HHS replaces the older terms, “hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma” and “hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic state”, because alterations of sensoria may be present without coma, and mild to moderate ketosis is commonly present in this state.4,5 Definitions vary according to the degree of hyperglycaemia and elevation of osmolality required. Table 1 summarises the definition of Kitabchi et al.5 Epidemiology The annual incidence of DKA among subjects with type 1 diabetes is between 1% and 5% in European and American series6–10 and this incidence appear Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

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