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Is Ketoacidosis Metabolic Acidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Rapid, deep breathing. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. Confusion. Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some test strips nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high. When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through your vein and closely watching certain chemicals in your blood (electrolyt Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. See also separate Lactic Acidosis and Arterial Blood Gases - Indications and Interpretations articles. Description Metabolic acidosis is defined as an arterial blood pH <7.35 with plasma bicarbonate <22 mmol/L. Respiratory compensation occurs normally immediately, unless there is respiratory pathology. Pure metabolic acidosis is a term used to describe when there is not another primary acid-base derangement - ie there is not a mixed acid-base disorder. Compensation may be partial (very early in time course, limited by other acid-base derangements, or the acidosis exceeds the maximum compensation possible) or full. The Winter formula can be helpful here - the formula allows calculation of the expected compensating pCO2: If the measured pCO2 is >expected pCO2 then additional respiratory acidosis may also be present. It is important to remember that metabolic acidosis is not a diagnosis; rather, it is a metabolic derangement that indicates underlying disease(s) as a cause. Determination of the underlying cause is the key to correcting the acidosis and administering appropriate therapy[1]. Epidemiology It is relatively common, particularly among acutely unwell/critical care patients. There are no reliable figures for its overall incidence or prevalence in the population at large. Causes of metabolic acidosis There are many causes. They can be classified according to their pathophysiological origin, as below. The table is not exhaustive but lists those that are most common or clinically important to detect. Increased acid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Severity Of Hyperglycemia And Metabolic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Relationship Between Severity Of Hyperglycemia And Metabolic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

We evaluated 114 hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (occurring in 78 patients) retrospectively by using the Mayo Clinic medical records system. Initial plasma glucose and serum bicarbonate values were examined by using regression analysis. No correlation was found between these two measurements (r = −0.03). The reason for this dissociation between hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia needs further elucidation, but it may be related to impaired hepatic glucose production in some patients. Copyright © 1988 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

© 1996–2017 themedicalbiochemistrypage.org, LLC | info @ themedicalbiochemistrypage.org Definition of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The most severe and life threatening complication of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is characterized by metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia. Diagnosis of DKA is accomplished by detection of hyperketonemia and metabolic acidosis (as measured by the anion gap) in the presence of hyperglycemia. The anion gap refers to the difference between the concentration of cations other than sodium and the concentration of anions other than chloride and bicarbonate. The anion gap therefore, represents an artificial assessment of the unmeasured ions in plasma. Calculation of the anion gap involves sodium (Na+), chloride (Cl–) and bicarbonate (HCO3–) measurements and it is defined as [Na+ – (Cl– + HCO3–)] where the sodium and chloride concentrations are measured as mEq/L and the bicarbonate concentration is mmol/L. The anion gap will increase when the concentration of plasma K+, Ca2+, or Mg2+ is decreased, when organic ions such as lactate are increased (or foreign anions accumulate), or when the concentration or charge of plasma proteins increases. Normal anion gap is between 8mEq/L and 12mEq/L and a higher number is diagnostic of metabolic acidosis. Rapid and aggressive treatment is necessary as the metabolic acidosis will result in cerebral edema and coma eventually leading to death. The hyperketonemia in DKA is the result of insulin deficiency and unregulated glucagon secretion from α-cells of the pancreas. Circulating glucagon stimulates the adipose tissue to release fatty acids stored in triglycerides. The free fatty acids enter the circulation and are taken up primarily by the liver where Continue reading >>

Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Abstract The utility of bicarbonate administration to patients with severe metabolic acidosis remains controversial. Chronic bicarbonate replacement is obviously indicated for patients who continue to lose bicarbonate in the ambulatory setting, particularly patients with renal tubular acidosis syndromes or diarrhea. In patients with acute lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis, lactate and ketone bodies can be converted back to bicarbonate if the clinical situation improves. For these patients, therapy must be individualized. In general, bicarbonate should be given at an arterial blood pH of ≤7.0. The amount given should be what is calculated to bring the pH up to 7.2. The urge to give bicarbonate to a patient with severe acidemia is apt to be all but irresistible. Intervention should be restrained, however, unless the clinical situation clearly suggests benefit. Here we discuss the pros and cons of bicarbonate therapy for patients with severe metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis is an acid-base disorder characterized by a primary consumption of body buffers including a fall in blood bicarbonate concentration. There are many causes (Table 1), and there are multiple mechanisms that minimize the fall in arterial pH. A patient with metabolic acidosis may have a normal or even high pH if there is another primary, contravening event that raises the bicarbonate concentration (vomiting) or lowers the arterial Pco2 (respiratory alkalosis). Metabolic acidosis differs from “acidemia” in that the latter refers solely to a fall in blood pH and not the process. A recent online survey by Kraut and Kurtz1 highlighted the uncertainty over when to give bicarbonate to patients with metabolic acidosis. They reported that nephrologists will prescribe therapy at a higher pH compared with Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Mechanism Of Normochloremic And Hyperchloremic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Mechanism Of Normochloremic And Hyperchloremic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Oh M.S. · Carroll H.J. · Uribarri J. Man S. Oh, MD, Department of Medicine, State University of New York, Health Science Center at Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (USA) Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Vomiting?

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Vomiting?

DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body’s cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can’t get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn’t available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body’s metabolic processes aren’t able to function as well. A higher level of ketones also affects levels of sugar and electrolytes in the body. As ketones accumulate in the blood, more ketones will be passed in the urine, taking sodium and potassium salts out with them. Over time, levels of sodium and potassium salts in the body become depleted, which can cause nausea and vomiting. The result is a vicious cycle. The most important prevention strategies are to monitor blood glucose levels routinely, keep blood glucose levels controlled (e.g., Continue reading >>

D-lactate: A Novel Contributor To Metabolic Acidosis And High Anion Gap In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

D-lactate: A Novel Contributor To Metabolic Acidosis And High Anion Gap In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA),the most common and serious acute complication of diabetes, is characterized by hyperglycemia and severe high–anion-gap metabolic acidosis with ketonemia (1). In DKA, the high anion gap is attributed largely to excessive production of blood ketone bodies, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate quantification is recommended for the diagnosis and monitoring of DKA (2). However, even counting of all the ketone bodies, including β-hydroxybutyrate, does not account for the entire anion gap, suggesting that there are additional sources of anion production in DKA. We recently demonstrated that plasma d-lactate concentrations were greatly increased in DKA compared with the concentrations in diabetic patients or a healthy control group (3). Nevertheless, the clinical value of d-lactate measurement in metabolic acidosis, especially the contribution of d-lactate to the metabolic acidosis and high anion gap in DKA, is not well appreciated. We report here that decreasing d-lactate concentrations are associated with improved clinical situations, whereas increased lactate concentrations are associated with the severity of metabolic acidosis and high anion gap in patients with DKA. The study included 38 diabetic patients with DKA, 42 diabetic patients without DKA, and 40 healthy controls. The institutional ethics review board of the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College approved the study, and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. For patients with DKA, blood samples were collected at the time of admission to the emergency room and following medical treatment after admission, when the patient's condition became stabilized. Plasma methylglyoxal was assayed by LC-MS (3). Plasma d-lactate concentration was determined by an e Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION Lactate levels greater than 2 mmol/L represent hyperlactatemia, whereas lactic acidosis is generally defined as a serum lactate concentration above 4 mmol/L. Lactic acidosis is the most common cause of metabolic acidosis in hospitalized patients. Although the acidosis is usually associated with an elevated anion gap, moderately increased lactate levels can be observed with a normal anion gap (especially if hypoalbuminemia exists and the anion gap is not appropriately corrected). When lactic acidosis exists as an isolated acid-base disturbance, the arterial pH is reduced. However, other coexisting disorders can raise the pH into the normal range or even generate an elevated pH. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis", section on 'Assessment of the serum anion gap' and "Simple and mixed acid-base disorders".) Lactic acidosis occurs when lactic acid production exceeds lactic acid clearance. The increase in lactate production is usually caused by impaired tissue oxygenation, either from decreased oxygen delivery or a defect in mitochondrial oxygen utilization. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis".) The pathophysiology and causes of lactic acidosis will be reviewed here. The possible role of bicarbonate therapy in such patients is discussed separately. (See "Bicarbonate therapy in lactic acidosis".) PATHOPHYSIOLOGY A review of the biochemistry of lactate generation and metabolism is important in understanding the pathogenesis of lactic acidosis [1]. Both overproduction and reduced metabolism of lactate appear to be operative in most patients. Cellular lactate generation is influenced by the "redox state" of the cell. The redox state in the cellular cytoplasm is reflected by the ratio of oxidized and reduced nicotine ad Continue reading >>

Haemofiltration As A Treatment Option In Refractory Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Haemofiltration As A Treatment Option In Refractory Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Background: Treating life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with a pH of <6.9 is extremely challenging and often refractory to treatment using standard fixed dose insulin DKA management protocols which may not work effectively at this low pH because of increased insulin resistance. I.v. bicarbonate (HCO3) use in this situation can be considered but remains controversial due to the risk of significant side effects as well as limited evidence in literature. Here we attempt to describe a case of fulminant DKA without renal failure, where treatment with haemofiltration (HF) for severe metabolic acidosis was successful. Case history: A 23-year-old female with history of recurrent episodes of DKA and poor diabetes control secondary to non-compliance, presented to the emergency department via ambulance after being found collapsed and had successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity and was subsequently treated with standard DKA protocol. Investigations on admission: pH 6.752, HCO3 1.3, lactate 3.1, base excess −30, blood glucose 45 mmol/l, blood ketones 6 mmol/l, creatinine 133 mmol, urea 10.8 mmol, and eGFR 43. Treatment: Despite maximal DKA treatment over three hours, including 5 l of i.v. fluid, and maximum fixed rate i.v. insulin at 15 units/h, she continued to be in severe metabolic acidosis with pH 6.772, HCO3 1.7, ketones 5, and blood glucose 40.1, without any improvement in her Glasgow coma scale of 8. Options were discussed at length with critical care and endocrine teams regarding use of i.v. bicarbonate therapy vs HF. She was then put on HF which resolved the metabolic acidosis completely within 12 h. Discussion: Our patient responded to HF with resolution of severe metabolic acidosis. There are no guidelines at present that com Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

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