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Is Ketoacidosis Life Threatening?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Definition: A hyperglycemic, acidotic state caused by insulin deficiency. The disease state consists of 3 parameters: Hyperglycemia (glucose > 250 mg/dl) Acidosis Ketosis Epidemiology Incidence of ~ 10,000 cases/year in US Mortality rate: 2-5% (prior to insulin was 100%) (Lebovitz 1995) Pathophysiology Insulin deficiency leads to serum glucose rise Increased glucose load in kidney leads to increased glucose in urine and osmotic diuresis Osmotic diuresis is accompanied by loss of electrolytes including sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium Volume depletion leads to impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) Inability to properly metabolize glucose results in fatty acid breakdown with resultant ketone bodies (acetoacetate + beta-hydroxybutyrate) Causes: An acute insult leads to decompensation of a chronic disease. Can also be first manifestation of new onset diabetes (particularly in children). Below are common triggers Infection (particularly sepsis) Myocardial ischemia or infarction Medication non-compliance Clinical Presentation History Polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia Weakness Weight loss Nausea/Vomiting Abdominal Pain Physical Examination Acetone odor on breath (“fruity” smell) Kussmaul’s respirations – deep fast breathing (tachypnea and hyperpnea) Tachycardia Hypotension Altered mental status Abdominal tenderness Diagnostic Testing Definitive diagnosis is established by laboratory criteria as detailed above (hyperglycemia, ketosis and acidosis) Essential Diagnostic Tests Serum glucose Typically > 350 mg/dL Euglycemic DKA (< 300 mg/dL) reported in up to 18% of patients Blood gas Patients will exhibit an anion gap metabolic Electrolytes: hypo/hyper/normokalemia, hyponatremia Arterial or venous blood gas can be used (Savage 2011) Urinalysis Glucosuria Ketonur Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

CE credit is no longer available for this article. Expired July 2005 Originally posted April 2004 VERONICA CRUMP, RN, BSN VERONICA CRUMP is a nurse on the surgical unit of Morristown Memorial Hospital in Morristown, N.J. She's also a subacute care nurse in the hospital's rehabilitation division. KEY WORDS: hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS), diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hepatic glucose production, proteolysis, hepatic gluconeogenesis, ketone bodies, metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, hypokalemia When a patient presents with markedly high blood glucose levels, the consequences can be fatal. Here's how to get your patient through the crisis. Edith Schafer, age 71, has just been admitted to your ICU with pneumonia, which she developed at home. She has a history of Type 2 diabetes. In addition to a temperature of 102° F (38.9° C), she has rapid, shallow breathing and dry, flushed skin. Her blood pressure is 96/70 mm Hg, and she's so lethargic that she's unable to keep her eyes open. Her lab results show a serum glucose level of 900 mg/dL. In addition to the pneumonia, Mrs. Schafer is suffering from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS). Severe hyperglycemia is a complication of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It can indicate HHS or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), another life-threatening condition. HHS tends to occur in patients with Type 2 diabetes, like Mrs. Schafer, while Type 1 diabetics are more likely to develop DKA. However, DKA can occur in Type 2 diabetes as well.1 HHS and DKA can be set off by infection, stress, missed medication, and other causes. In Mrs. Schafer's case, the trigger was pneumonia, a common cause of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes. No matter what the cause, though, a case of HHS or DKA can turn deadly if not caught in time. The m Continue reading >>

Severe Ketoacidosis (ph ≤ 6.9) In Type 2 Diabetes: More Frequent And Less Ominous Than Previously Thought

Severe Ketoacidosis (ph ≤ 6.9) In Type 2 Diabetes: More Frequent And Less Ominous Than Previously Thought

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening acute metabolic complication of uncontrolled diabetes. This illness results from the relative or absolute deficiency of insulin and an increase in counterregulatory hormones such as glucagon, cortisol, catecholamines, and growth hormone [1, 2]. Despite notable advances in treatment and use of novel drugs with multiple mechanisms of action, hospital admissions due to DKA have increased 30% in the US in the last decade [3]. Classically described in type 1 diabetes, DKA can also occur in type 2 diabetes during catabolic stress scenarios such as infections, surgery, and trauma or late during the natural history of the disease, when the beta-cell function is lost. Severe cases of DKA (pH ≤ 7.00, bicarbonate level ≤ 10.0, anion gap > 12, positive ketones, and altered mental status) are commonly encountered in patients with type 1 diabetes and are thought to carry an ominous prognosis [2, 4]. The acid-base status in particular has received great attention, due to the potential of bicarbonate-based therapy. There is not enough information on the clinical course of severely acidotic type 2 diabetes patients with DKA, possibly because this condition is rarely seen in developed countries, where there is greater control of diabetes and greater accessibility to medical services. In many developing countries like Mexico, severe DKA in type 2 diabetes patients is very common and represents a therapeutic challenge even for an experienced physician. Despite the fact that several guidelines describe the classification and treatment of severe DKA, most of the recommendations in this scenario are based on case reports and small case series that do not enable the physician to predict the true evolution of this seri Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Go to: Case A 27-year-old female in her fourth pregnancy presented at 31 weeks’ gestation to the delivery suite with reduced fetal movements on a background of a week-long history of vomiting, poor oral intake and intermittent upper abdominal pain radiating to her back. Her past medical history was notable for depression and a psychotic episode 2 years prior to this pregnancy. Her previous pregnancies were not complicated by GDM. She had stopped her antipsychotic medication prior to her booking appointment, but was admitted to a psychiatric hospital at 20 weeks of gestation with a further episode. At that time olanzapine 20mg daily was commenced in addition to the 40mg fluoxetine that she had been taking regularly prior to and throughout pregnancy. At 23 and 27 weeks of gestation, glycosuria was identified on urine dipstick testing. Metformin was commenced after an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test (fasting glucose 8.1mmol/L, 2h glucose 12.7mmol/L) at 28 weeks. Metformin resulted in some improvement in glycaemic control. She had taken no other medications during pregnancy and denied any substance misuse. Booking body mass index was 37kg/m2. On examination she looked unwell. She was tachypnoeic, tachycardic and hypertensive (heart rate 130 beats per minute, blood pressure 162/103mm Hg). On abdominal palpation there was tenderness in the epigastric region without peritonism. The gravid uterus was an appropriate size for gestational age. Cardiotocography was reassuring. Blood tests were notable for anaemia (haemoglobin 10.4g/dL) and neutrophilia (20.1×109/L). Urinalysis was positive for protein (trace) and ketones (4+). Arterial blood gas analysis showed a profound metabolic acidosis with partial respiratory compensation (pH 7.24, PaCO2 1.4kPa, PaO2 15.5kPa, base exc Continue reading >>

Articles :: D :: Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Articles :: D :: Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes, caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Find out how to spot it, how it's treated, and how you can prevent it. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. It occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a potentially harmful by-product called ketones. Read more about the causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. It's fairly common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. Children and young adults are most at risk. It's important to seek medical advice quickly if you think that you or your child is experiencing the condition, because serious complications of diabetic ketoacidosis can develop if it's not treated early on. Warning signs to look out for If you take insulin to control your diabetes, you should keep an eye out for signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Early signs and symptoms can include: passing large amounts of urine feeling sick tiredness an increase in your blood sugar and/or ketone levels self-testing kits are available to check these (see below) You may become very dehydrated and if the condition isn't treated quickly, it can lead to vomiting, an increased breathing and heart rate, dizziness, drowsiness, a smell of pear drops or nail varnish on your breath, and loss of consciousness. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. What to do If you think that you or your child are experiencing early symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis, and self-test Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Here’s what you need to know about the life-threatening diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Symptoms can take you by surprise, coming on in just 24 hours or less. Without diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, you will fall into a coma and die. “Every minute that the person is not treated is [another] minute closer to death,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin. (Diabetic ketoacidosis most often affects people with type 1 diabetes, but there is also type 2 diabetes ketoacidosis.) Without insulin, sugar can’t be stored in your cells to be used as energy and builds up in your blood instead. Your body has to go to a back-up energy system: fat. In the process of breaking down fat for energy, your body releases fatty acids and acids called ketones. Ketones are an alternative form of energy for the body, and just having them in your blood isn’t necessarily harmful. That’s called ketosis, and it can happen when you go on a low-carb diet or even after fasting overnight. “When I put people on a restricted diet, I can get an estimate of how vigorously they’re pursuing it by the presence of ketones in the urine,” says Gerald Bernstein, MD, an endocrinologist and coordinator of the Friedman Diabetes Program at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. RELATED: The Ketogenic Diet Might Be the Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It? But too many ketones are a problem. “In individuals with diabetes who have no or low insulin production, there is an overproduction of ketones, and the kidneys can’t get rid of them fast enough,” sa Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic acidosis is a life-threatening condition that can occur in people with type 1 diabetes. Less commonly, it can also occur with type 2 diabetes. Term watch Ketones: breakdown products from the use of fat stores for energy. Ketoacidosis: another name for diabetic acidosis. It happens when a lack of insulin leads to: Diabetic acidosis requires immediate hospitalisation for urgent treatment with fluids and intravenous insulin. It can usually be avoided through proper treatment of Type 1 diabetes. However, ketoacidosis can also occur with well-controlled diabetes if you get a severe infection or other serious illness, such as a heart attack or stroke, which can cause vomiting and resistance to the normal dose of injected insulin. What causes diabetic acidosis? The condition is caused by a lack of insulin, most commonly when doses are missed. While insulin's main function is to lower the blood sugar level, it also reduces the burning of body fat. If the insulin level drops significantly, the body will start burning fat uncontrollably while blood sugar levels rise. Glucose will then begin to show up in your urine, along with ketone bodies from fat breakdown that turn the body acidic. The body attempts to reduce the level of acid by increasing the rate and depth of breathing. This blows off carbon dioxide in the breath, which tends to correct the acidosis temporarily (known as acidotic breathing). At the same time, the high secretion of glucose into the urine causes large quantities of water and salts to be lost, putting the body at serious risk of dehydration. Eventually, over-breathing becomes inadequate to control the acidosis. What are the symptoms? Since diabetic acidosis is most often linked with high blood sugar levels, symptoms are the same as those for diabetes Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Cerebral Oedema In Children And Adolescents With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Risk Factors For Cerebral Oedema In Children And Adolescents With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Cerebral oedema (CO) is a rare life-threatening complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children. We analysed the biochemical and therapeutic risk factors for CO in DKA by a retrospective review of 256 children hospitalized for DKA between February 2003 and March 2015. The demographic characteristics, biochemical variables and therapeutic interventions were compared between the patients with and without CO. CO was observed in 22 (8.6%) of the 256 subjects included in the study. One of these patients (5%) had a fatal outcome and two patients (9%) survived with neurological consequences. CO was significantly associated with severe DKA: lower initial venous pH (p < 0.001) and bicarbonate (p < 0.001), higher initial blood glucose (p < 0.01), urea level (p < 0.05) and baseline serum osmolality (р < 0.05). During the treatment of DKA, low serum phosphate level was found to be significantly associated with CO (p < 0.05). We also found significant dependence between the development of CO and the initiation of treatment for DKA in another facility before hospitalization in our hospital (p < 0.05), bicarbonate application (p < 0.001), higher fluid volume infused initially (p < 0.01) and delayed potassium substitution (p < 0.01). Severe ketoacidosis, hyperglycaemia and dehydration at presentation, and low serum phosphate during treatment are significantly related to CO formation in children with DKA. The initial severe acidosis and hyperglycaemia probably cause brain injury which progresses into CO in the course of developing hypophosphatemia and cerebral hypervolemia. Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: not taking insulin severe infection severe illness bad insulin In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also freque Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Meds Linked To Life-threatening Complication

New Diabetes Meds Linked To Life-threatening Complication

A new class of type 2 diabetes drugs called SGLT2 inhibitors could increase the risk of a rare, life-threatening complication of the disease called ketoacidosis, a new study warns. SGLT2 inhibitors include prescription medications such as canagliflozin, dapagliflozin and empagliflozin. Brand names are Invokana, Invokamet, Farxiga, Xigduo XR, Jardiance and Glyxambi. (A previous Health24 article reported on dapagliflozin.) Uncommon in type 2 diabetics These drugs first became available in 2013, but in 2015 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning about an increased risk for diabetic ketoacidosis when SGLT2 inhibitors are used. The condition typically occurs in people with type 1 diabetes. And while it is uncommon in people with type 2 diabetes, case reports have shown it can occur with type 2 disease, according to the study authors. Ketoacidosis can cause: Vomiting Abdominal pain Shortness of breath Swelling in the brain Left untreated, the condition can be fatal, the researchers said. The new study "essentially confirms what doctors had already suspected," said diabetes expert Dr Stanislaw Klek, an endocrinologist at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, New York "Fortunately, the rate of diabetic ketoacidosis is still very low and should not prevent the usage of this medication class," he added. "It is important to be aware of this potential complication and monitor for symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly during periods of illness." Risk remains slim In the new study, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston analysed data from 40 000 people with type 2 diabetes. They found that those taking SGLT2 inhibitors were twice as likely to develop diabetic ketoacidosis than those taking another class of diabetes drugs called DPP4 inhibitors Continue reading >>

Children With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Children With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Two weeks before a family vacation last spring, 10-year-old Hailey Evans started to drink a lot more water. Her parents didn’t think much of it, given that Hailey had just joined a running team at her school in Northern Virginia and was exercising more. Not long after landing in Bolivia, where one of Hailey’s grandparents lives, she complained of a stomachache and nausea. Altitude sickness, her parents figured. Then Hailey took a sudden turn for the worse. Hospitalized the next day, she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes within an hour. A few hours after that, she was in coma caused by swelling in her brain and severe dehydration. The next morning, April 20th, Hailey died, two weeks shy of her 11th birthday. Hailey’s devastated parents, Vanessa and Derrick Evans, now have joined a growing chorus of voices determined to raise awareness of Type 1 diabetes and push for more regular blood sugar testing. While Type 1 diabetes is the second most common chronic illness of childhood—trailing only asthma—it can mimic other common ailments and often is missed until it has taken a potentially deadly turn. “We had no idea,” Vanessa Evans says. “I wish I would have known, because maybe taking her to the doctor sooner would have saved her life. I would have never thought this could happen to anyone, much less us, yet here we are, left without our beautiful daughter. I don’t wish this pain on anyone. As we learned the hard way, with this disease, every minute, every hour, every day counts.” Cases of Type 1 diabetes are increasing worldwide, particularly in young children. Warning signs can include extreme thirst, frequent urination, a fruity breath odor and blurred vision, as well as generalized symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, stomachache, appetite changes and we Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. It's important to seek medical advice quickly if you think that you or your child is experiencing the condition. Causes of diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that can occur if the body starts to run out of insulin. It's common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. Children and young adults are most at risk. Insulin enables the body to use blood sugar (glucose). If there is a lack of insulin, or if it can't be used properly, the body will break down fat instead. The breakdown of fat releases harmful, acidic substances called ketones.The lack of insulin in your body leads to high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). The combination of high ketone and blood sugar levels can cause a number of symptoms that can be very serious if the levels aren't corrected quickly. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis The initial symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis can develop quite suddenly. They will continue to get worse if not treated. Early symptoms In the early stages, the main signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine severe thirst weight loss feeling sick tiredness You may also develop other symptoms of dehydration, such as a dry mouth. If you have your own device or kit to measure your blood sugar and/or ketone levels, you may notice that the levels of both of these are higher than normal. Advanced symptoms Left untreated, more advanced symptoms can develop, including: rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) rapid breathing, where you breathe in more oxygen than your body actua Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

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