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Is Ketoacidosis Life Threatening?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Simulator: A New Learning Tool For A Life Threatening Condition

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Simulator: A New Learning Tool For A Life Threatening Condition

Isabel Huguet, J Joaquín Alfaro, César Gonzalvo, Cristina Lamas, Antonio Hernández & Francisco Botella Introduction: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) remains a life threatening complication in type 1 diabetes. Appropiate initial management is crucial in the evolution of this complex condition, and mistakes in the treatment are not uncommon. Medical simulation technology is a powerful tool for training physicians but papers dealing with DKA simulators are scarce. We introduce a new simulator designed in our institution aimed to junior doctors’ training in DKA treatment whose implementation permits physicians to solve more case than what they would manage in the Emergency Room. Material and methods: A software was developed by using mathematic algorithms based in previously published and empiric formulas to simulate the evolution of DKA both under appropriate and inappropriate management. Results: The DKA simulator shows several cases to the trainee. Every case is compound by a clinical history and some variables which define the basal situation of the simulated patient: sex, age, weight, glucose, 3-β-OH-butyrate, sodium, potassium, serum creatinine, renal function, grade of dehydration, insulin sensitivity and ability to hyperventilation. The last four parameters are not shown to the trainee, but used by the simulator. The trainee has to indicate the initial management, ask for biochemical test when necessary, and make successive changes in the treatment (iv insulin rate, type and rate of fluidotherapy and potassium administered) until DKA resolution is reached or, eventually, the death of the patient happens if the management has not been correct. By using mathematical algorithms, and according to the characteristics and the duration of the treatment, our simulator pro Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: A Life-threatening Approach To Thinness

Diabulimia: A Life-threatening Approach To Thinness

By Kathryn E. Ackerman, MD, MPH and Tarin E. Jackson People living with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) are taught to be conscious of the foods they eat. They decide their dose of insulin shots based on how many carbs they eat. This focus on food can become obsessive. People who have type 1 DM and are fixated on their body image are at risk for eating disorders similar to anorexia nervosa and bulimia. “Diabulimia” [dye-a-byoo-LEE-mee-uh], an unofficial, non-medical term that combines “diabetes” and “bulimia,” describes the condition that results from omitting or reducing insulin doses to lose weight. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to metabolize food, specifically sugar (glucose). People with type 1 DM do not make insulin. As a result, their cells cannot use glucose and will “starve” unless insulin is injected. When the body cannot use glucose for energy, it begins to break down fat. This causes acid byproducts called ketones [KEE-tones]. Glucose is lost in the urine and fat is burned, leading to rapid weight loss. However, if the ketones and blood sugar levels continue to increase, the person’s life will be in danger from extreme dehydration and acidosis, known as diabetic ketoacidosis [KEE-toh-ass-i-DOH-sis] (DKA). Diabulimics often try a dangerous balancing act. They purposely skip some insulin doses to lose weight, while trying to avoid DKA. They may lie about their blood sugar levels, skip A1c checks, and use other means to hide their high blood sugars. Diabulimics often feel weak, cannot concentrate, and become thirsty. But even if diabulimics don’t develop DKA or the symptoms of poor blood sugar control, over time they will be at high risk for diabetic complications. These complications include kidney damage, blindness, and heart diseas Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Maintaining Glucose Control

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Maintaining Glucose Control

The metabolic chain reaction that precedes diabetic ketoacidosis can occur rapidly, and this potentially life-threatening condition requires swift recognition and treatment. Two critical words in a diabetic’s vocabulary are “management” and “control.” When a patient with diabetes fails to manage food intake and loses control of blood sugar levels, hyperglycemia follows. In most cases, blood sugar levels elevate slightly, which prompts the individual with diabetes to take action to lower those levels. Under some conditions, blood sugar rises precipitously, which is usually caused by 1 or more of the following1-3 : • Developing or fulminant infection (especially Klebsiella pneumonia) or illness • Serious disruption of insulin treatment • New onset of diabetes • Physical or emotional stress • Adverse drug reaction (especially to corticosteroids, pentamidine, thiazides, sympathomimetics, or secondgeneration antipsychotics4 ) Acute, life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can develop rapidly. Table 11,2 describes criteria usually used to define DKA. We typically associate this metabolic abnormality with type 1 diabetes, but it also occurs in some patients with type 2 diabetes, with infection or an adverse drug reaction as the primary causes. As blood sugar rises in DKA, the patient becomes dehydrated and metabolic changes produce acidosis.1,2,4,5 Pathophysiology DKA usually occurs when absolute or relative insulin deficiency leads to increased counter-regulatory hormones (ie, glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone, epinephrine). These hormones enhance hepatic glucose production (gluconeogenesis), glycogenolysis, and lipolysis, all of which increase free fatty acids (FFAs) in circulation. With insulin unavailable, the liver turns to FFAs as an alternative Continue reading >>

Should Sodium Bicarbonate Be Administered In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Should Sodium Bicarbonate Be Administered In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

To the Editor: In the November 2001 issue of AJRCCM, Boord and colleagues (1) published the article “Practical Management of Diabetes in Critically Ill Patients.” In the section titled “Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Nonketotic Hyperosmolar Syndrome,” they quoted articles reporting a mortality rate of diabetic ketoacidosis between 2 and 20%. However, they did not mention that only the most severe stage of ketoacidosis, ketoacidotic coma, is life threatening (2). Its immediate cause is low blood-pH (3). Boord and colleagues have quoted the articles of Okuda and colleagues (4) and Viallon and colleagues (5) as evidence of the inefficiency of sodium bicarbonate treatment in diabetic ketoacidosis. However, the patients of Okuda and colleagues “gave consent to participate in the study”; thus, they were not comatose. The patients of Viallon and colleagues had Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14, i.e., they also were not comatose (this being a score of 3–4 in a comatose patient). Therefore, these two articles are not suitable for evaluation of the efficiency of treatment of the life-threatening stage of diabetic ketaocidosis, ketoacidotic coma, and of the influence of treatment on mortality rate (all patients survived because they were not comatose). On the other hand, Lever and Jaspan (6) have observed 27 patients with diabetic ketoacidotic coma and blood pH below 7.10; all recovered to full alertness with administration of sodium bicarbonate infusions simultaneously with increase of the low blood pH to values of 7.29–7.40. Where is there a published report on a similar number of comatose patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, with zero lethality, without sodium bicarbonate, and without increase of the low blood pH? 1. Boord JB, Graber AL, Christman JW, Pow Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. It's important to seek medical advice quickly if you think that you or your child is experiencing the condition. Causes of diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that can occur if the body starts to run out of insulin. It's common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. Children and young adults are most at risk. Insulin enables the body to use blood sugar (glucose). If there is a lack of insulin, or if it can't be used properly, the body will break down fat instead. The breakdown of fat releases harmful, acidic substances called ketones.The lack of insulin in your body leads to high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). The combination of high ketone and blood sugar levels can cause a number of symptoms that can be very serious if the levels aren't corrected quickly. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis The initial symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis can develop quite suddenly. They will continue to get worse if not treated. Early symptoms In the early stages, the main signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine severe thirst weight loss feeling sick tiredness You may also develop other symptoms of dehydration, such as a dry mouth. If you have your own device or kit to measure your blood sugar and/or ketone levels, you may notice that the levels of both of these are higher than normal. Advanced symptoms Left untreated, more advanced symptoms can develop, including: rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) rapid breathing, where you breathe in more oxygen than your body actua Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

OVERVIEW potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes melitus resulting from the consequences of insulin deficiency Diagnostic criteria pH < 7.3 ketosis (ketonemia or ketonuria) HCO3 <15 mmol/L due to high anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA) hyperglycemia (may be mild; euglycemic DKA can occur) PATHOGENESIS increased glucagon, cortisol, catcholamines, GH decreased insulin -> hyperglycaemia -> hyperosmolality + glycosuria -> electrolyte loss -> ketone production from metabolism of TG -> acidosis HISTORY dry, abdominal pain, polyuria, weight loss, coma risk factors: non-compliance, illness, newly diagnosed ROS to rule find out possible precipitant (infection, MI, pneumonia, GI illness) normal insulin regime diabetic control previous DKA’s/admissions previous ICU admissions EXAMINATION volume assessment signs of cause e.g. (infection) GCS work of breathing INVESTIGATIONS ABG electrolytes osmolality urinalysis: ketones pregnancy test standard investigations to rule out cause: FBC, ECG, CXR MANAGEMENT Goals (1) establish precipitant and treat (2) assess severity of metabolic derangement (3) cautious fluid resuscitation with replacement of body H2O (4) provision of insulin (5) replacement of electrolytes Resuscitate intubation for airway protection if required O2 as required IV access fluid boluses (20mL/kg boluses of NS/HMN) urinary catheter Acid-base and Electrolyte abnormalities will have a severe metabolic acidosis with probable incomplete respiratory compensation K+ may be normal but patient will have a whole body K+ deficiency -> needs to be replaced once < 5mmol/L -> use KH2PO4 Na+ may be deranged acidaemia rarely requires HCO3- therapy and will respond to other treatments Specific therapy start insulin infusion (avoid bolus) 0.1u/kg/hr aim to lower glucose Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Brain Function

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Brain Function

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening consequence of diabetes. DKA occurs when there is a lack of insulin in the body causing hyperglycemia. As a result of the inability of glucose to enter the cells, the body must find other means to obtain energy. As such, fat breakdown occurs resulting in the accumulation of fatty acids. The fatty acids are metabolized to ketones that cause the blood to become acidotic (pH less than7.3). Because glucose remains in the blood, there is an increase in thirst and drinking to eliminate the solute load of glucose, which also results in increased urination (polyuria and polydipsia). Thus, the combination of increased serum acidity, weight loss, polyuria, and polydipsia may lead to extreme dehydration, coma, or brain damage. Without a doubt, the most severe acute complication of DKA is cerebral edema. Many cases of new onset type 1 diabetes present DKA (15-70 percent depending on age and geographic region, according to multiple studies), hence the importance of an early diagnosis of diabetes in order to avoid potential consequences. Much research is being conducted to predict the development of severe complications of DKA, most notably on brain herniation, the swelling of the brain that causes it to push towards the spinal cord, as well as other neurological consequences. Fulminant cerebral edema, or swelling of the brain, is relatively rare and has an incidence rate of 0.5-0.9 percent. However, what about the subtler, less severe alterations in brain functions that occur after DKA? Indeed, a recent paper published in Diabetes Care 2014; 37: 1554-1562by Cameron, Scratch, Nadebaum, Northum, Koves, Jennings, Finney, Neil, Wellard, Mackay, and Inder on behalf of the DKA Brain Injury Study Group entitled "Neurological Consequences of Continue reading >>

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially fatal metabolic disorder presenting most weeks in most accident and emergency (A&E) departments.1 The disorder can have significant mortality if misdiagnosed or mistreated. Numerous management strategies have been described. Our aim is to describe a regimen that is based, as far as possible, on available evidence but also on our experience in managing patients with DKA in the A&E department and on inpatient wards. A literature search was carried out on Medline and the Cochrane Databases using “diabetic ketoacidosis” as a MeSH heading and as textword. High yield journals were hand searched. Papers identified were appraised in the ways described in the Users’ guide series published in JAMA. We will not be discussing the derangements in intermediary metabolism involved, nor would we suggest extrapolating the proposed regimen to children. Although some of the issues discussed may be considered by some to be outwith the remit of A&E medicine it would seem prudent to ensure that A&E staff were aware of the probable management of such patients in the hours after they leave the A&E department. AETIOLOGY AND DEFINITION DKA may be the first presentation of diabetes. Insulin error (with or without intercurrent illness) is the most common precipitating factor, accounting for nearly two thirds of cases (excluding those where DKA was the first presentation of diabetes mellitus).2 The main features of DKA are hyperglycaemia, metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap and heavy ketonuria (box 1). This contrasts with the other hyperglycaemic diabetic emergency of hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycaemia where there is no acidosis, absent or minimal ketonuria but often very high glucose levels (>33 mM) and very high serum sodium levels (>15 Continue reading >>

Test One Drop To Stop ​diabetic Ketoacidosis

Test One Drop To Stop ​diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition which often develops quickly when the signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes have been overlooked or mistaken for other illnesses. A simple glucose test can detect early onset Type 1 diabetes and stop diabetic ketoacidosis before it kills! Progressing symptoms of undiagnosed Type 1 diabetes often imitate flu, strep, stomach virus, urinary tract infections, growth spurts and other common illnesses. When left untreated, Type 1 diabetes can develop into a life-threatening complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). If you or a loved one have a combination of the following symptoms, immediately request medical personnel Test One Drop of blood or urine for glucose (sugar) levels. A simple, inexpensive glucose test–performed in seconds–can save lives. These symptoms can be an indication of Type 1 diabetes. They are listed in possible order of progression, but your experience may vary. excessive thirst frequent urination bedwetting​ increased appetite abdominal pain irritability or mood changes headaches vision changes/blurriness itchy skin or genitals vaginal yeast infection thrush ​slow healing wounds ​recurrent infections sudden weight loss flushed, hot, dry skin muscle or leg cramps fruity/acetone scented breath nausea and vomiting* weakness or fatigue* shortness of breath* labored breathing* drowsiness or lethargy* confusion* stupor* unconsciousness* Anyone of any age, race, family medical history, socio-economic level, body type, general health condition, life-style, etc. can be diagnosed with an autoimmune disease called Type 1 diabetes. Despite the fact that it is also known as "juvenile diabetes", Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed in people of all ages, both children and adults. In fact, according to the U Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition caused by a build-up of waste products called ketones in the blood. It occurs in people with diabetes mellitus when they have no, or very low levels of, insulin. DKA mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, but it can also occur in some people with type 2 diabetes and pregnant women with gestational diabetes. Causes Glucose is an essential energy source for the body's cells. When food containing carbohydrates is eaten, it is broken down into glucose that travels around the body in the blood, to be absorbed by cells that use it for energy. Insulin works to help glucose pass into cells. Without insulin, the cells cannot absorb glucose to use for energy. This leads to a series of changes in metabolism that can affect the whole body. The liver attempts to compensate for the lack of energy in the cells by producing more glucose, leading to increased levels of glucose in the blood, also known as hyperglycaemia. The body switches to burning its stores of fat instead of glucose to produce energy. This leads to a build-up of acidic waste products called ketones in the blood and urine. This is known as ketoacidosis, and it can cause heart rhythm abnormalities, breathing changes and abdominal pain. The kidneys try to remove some of the excess glucose and ketones. However, this requires taking large amounts of fluid from the body, which leads to dehydration. This can cause: Increased concentration of ketones in the blood, worsening the ketoacidosis; Loss of electrolytes such as potassium and salt that are vital for the normal function of the body's cells, and; Signs and symptoms Symptoms of DKA can develop over the course of hours. They can include: Increased thirst; Increased frequency Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Severe Ketoacidosis Associated With Canagliflozin (invokana): A Safety Concern

Severe Ketoacidosis Associated With Canagliflozin (invokana): A Safety Concern

Case Reports in Critical Care Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1656182, 3 pages 1Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Providence Hospital and Medical Center, 16001 W 9 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075, USA 2Department of Internal Medicine, Providence Hospital and Medical Center, 16001 W 9 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075, USA Academic Editor: Kurt Lenz Copyright © 2016 Alehegn Gelaye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Canagliflozin (Invokana) is a selective sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor that was first introduced in 2013 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Though not FDA approved yet, its use in type 1 DM has been justified by the fact that its mechanism of action is independent of insulin secretion or action. However, some serious side effects, including severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), have been reported. Prompt identification of the causal association and initiation of appropriate therapy should be instituted for this life threatening condition. 1. Introduction More than 5 million patients are admitted annually to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A number of life threatening medical conditions, including diabetic ketoacidosis, can be associated with metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis may also arise from several drugs and toxins through a variety of mechanisms. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that Sodium Glucose Transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, including canagliflozin, may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis [1]. We pre Continue reading >>

Diabetes Danger: Warning Over Life-threatening Complications Ketoacidosis And Diabulimia

Diabetes Danger: Warning Over Life-threatening Complications Ketoacidosis And Diabulimia

The condition occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a potentially harmful by-product called ketones. It's fairly common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. “It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. NRS Healthcare has set out to raise awareness for people suffering with the condition and also highlight other issues including diabulimia, a recently reported condition where young people with diabetes choose not to take their insulin in order to lose weight. Alexandra Lomas, who is living with type 1 diabetes, has spoken out about how her delayed diagnosis led to her going through ketoacidosis and warned how young girls living with diabulimia risk experiencing the same horrific symptoms. “Before I had diabetes I had this long luscious thick hair, it was kind of like my crowning glory. “Six months leading up to my diagnosis I would be brushing my hair and pulling out these great big clumps of hair. “I lost six stone is as many months. I eventually lost so much weight that the sugar in my blood had started to eat away at my muscles. “Leading up to going into hospital was really really difficult. “When I got to the hospital they measured my heart rate and it was at 268 beats a minute - the normal rate is around 60 per minute. I felt like I was having a heart attack. “I recently read a story on diabulimia, where young girls across the UK aren’t taking their insulin as a type 1 diabetic in order to make their blood sugars rise and eat away at their fat and muscle and therefore they keep their weight down. “I wanted to make th Continue reading >>

Life-threatening Lactation Or “bovine” Ketoacidosis: A Case Report

Life-threatening Lactation Or “bovine” Ketoacidosis: A Case Report

Abstract Lactation or "bovine" ketoacidosis is a rare cause of raised anion gap metabolic acidosis whereby a perfect storm of negative calorie balance (starvation/glucose preferentially used for milk production) and insulin resistance (counter regulatory stress hormone release/infection) leads to a dysregulated ketogenic state. We present a case of life-threatening lactation-related ketoacidosis in a patient 9 weeks postpartum, who presented to the emergency department with an arterial pH of 6.88, HCO3 of 5.8 mmol/L and blood ketone level of 5.8 mmol/L. Treatment consists of aggressive glucose loading, triggering supraphysiologic endogenous insulin release, and subsequent inhibition of ketone body formation. Continue reading >>

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