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Is Ketoacidosis Hyperglycemia

How Does A Diabetic Ketoacidosis State Differ From A Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State?

How Does A Diabetic Ketoacidosis State Differ From A Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State?

A difficult question to answer, but try to put it in a simple way. Both are same but slightly differ. The root cause of DKA and HHS is lack of insulin effect, so the first key aim of treatment is insulin. While subcutaneous insulin may suffice in less severe cases, intravenous administration is to be preferred in more severe cases because severe dehydration and hypovolemia may interfere with the absorption of subcutaneous insulin. Use of insulin pumps must be carefully monitored by trained staff. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Electrolyte disturbances result from loss of water usually in excess of salt loss; hypovolaemia and severe intravascular dehydration will be accompanied by tachycardia and may give rise to thromboembolic complications (such as stroke or myocardial infarction), whereas cellular dehydration may ultimately cause the hyperosmolar coma. My Mother died on July 13th -2017 7.56 PM because of the same. Diabetic ketoacidosis is the characteristic metabolic emergency of t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Thirty Years Of Personal Experience In Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

Thirty Years Of Personal Experience In Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Thirty Years of Personal Experience in Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (A.E.K., J.N.F., M.B.M., F.B.S.), University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163 Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Abbas E. Kitabchi, Ph.D., M.D., Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Avenue, #909, Memphis, Tennessee 38163. Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology (G.E.U.), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (A.E.K., J.N.F., M.B.M., F.B.S.), University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (A.E.K., J.N.F., M.B.M., F.B.S.), University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (A.E.K., J.N.F., M.B.M., F.B.S.), University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163 Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 93, Issue 5, 1 May 2008, Pages 15411552, Abbas E. Kitabchi, Guillermo E. Umpierrez, Joseph N. Fisher, Mary Beth Murphy, Frankie B. Stentz; Thirty Years of Personal Experience in Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 93, Issue 5, 1 May 2008, Pages 15411552, Context: Diabetic ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis & Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemia Syndrome

Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis & Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemia Syndrome

Sort Hyperglycemia: Causes type of glucose level caused by 1) too much food, 2) too little diabetic medications, 3) inactivity, 4) emotional/physical stress, 5) poor absorption of insulin 6) illness 7) corticosteroids **counterregulatory hormones released when stress, illness persist Hyperglycemia: Manifestations manifests as 1) polyuria: osmotic diuresis (glucose in renal tubules cannot be reabsorbed; consequent hyperosmolarity and osmotic pressure results in more water in tubules) 2) polyphagia followed by lack of appetite, 3) polydipsia: hyperosmolarity of blood causes thirst as cells release more water into circulation 4) weakness/fatigue, 5) blurred vision, 6) glycosuria, 7) nausea/vomiting, 8) abdominal cramping 9) dry, warm, itchy skin Hyperglycemia: Treatment 1) exercise **do NOT exercise if BG 250 mg/dL (stress hormones released) and ketones (Type 1); do NOT exercise if >300 mg/dL (Type 2) 2) drink water 3) eat less CHO at meals **contact HCP if BG >250 mg/dL two-three times in one week During illness: 1) do NOT stop taking medication 2) check BG more frequently 3) clear liquids until no more nausea Hypoglycemia: Manifestations MILD: sweating, tremor, tachycardia, palpitation, nervousness, hunger MODERATE: poor concentration, numb lips/tongue, HA, light-headedness, slurred speech, irrational/combative behavior, visual disturbances SEVER: disorientation, loss of consciousness, difficult to arouse, seizures, coma **Can mimic alcohol intoxication. ***use of beta blockers interferes with recognizing the symptoms Hypoglycemia: Treatment RULE of 15: 1) check blood glucose for levels < 70 mg/dL 2) ingestion of 15-20g of a simple (fast-acting) carbohydrate: glucose tablets, 4 oz of juice, 1 T of honey, 4-6 oz soda ***NO CANDY BARS/COOKIES: treatment with fats s/b avoid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous complication of diabetes mellitus in which the chemical balance of the body becomes far too acidic. Description Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) always results from a severe insulin deficiency. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the body to lower the blood sugar levels when they become too high. Diabetes mellitus is the disease resulting from the inability of the body to produce or respond properly to insulin, required by the body to convert glucose to energy. In childhood diabetes, DKA complications represent the leading cause of death, mostly due to the accumulation of abnormally large amounts of fluid in the brain (cerebral edema). DKA combines three major features: hyperglycemia, meaning excessively high blood sugar kevels; hyperketonemia, meaning an overproduction of ketones by the body; and acidosis, meaning that the blood has become too acidic. Insulin deficiency is responsible for all three conditions: the body glucose goes largely unused since most cells are unable to transport glucose into the cell without the presence of insulin; this condition makes the body use stored fat as an alternative source instead of the unavailable glucose for energy, a process that produces acidic ketones, which build up because they require insulin to be broken down. The presence of excess ketones in the bloodstream in turn causes the blood to become more acidic than the body tissues, which creates a toxic condition. Causes and symptoms DKA is most commonly seen in individuals with type I diabetes, under 19 years of age and is usually caused by the interruption of their insulin treatment or by acute infection or trauma. A small number of people with type II diabetes also experience ketoacidosis, but this is rare give Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

The hallmark of diabetes is a raised plasma glucose resulting from an absolute or relative lack of insulin action. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Near-complete lack of insulin will result in diabetic ketoacidosis, which is therefore more characteristic of type 1 diabetes, whereas partial insulin deficiency will suppress hepatic ketogenesis but not hepatic glucose output, resulting in hyperglycaemia and dehydration, and culminating in the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. Hyperglycaemia is characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly in the previously undiagnosed, but it is the acidosis and the associated electrolyte disorders that make this a life-threatening condition. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Pathogenesis of DKA and HHS Insulin is a powerful anabolic hormone which helps nutrients to enter the cells, where these nutrients can be used either as fuel or as building blocks for cell growth and expansion. The complementary action of insulin is to antagonise the breakdown of fuel stores. Thus, the relea Continue reading >>

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

- [Voiceover] Oftentimes we think of diabetes mellitus as a chronic disease that causes serious complications over a long period of time if it's not treated properly. However, the acute complications of diabetes mellitus are often the most serious, and can be potentially even life threatening. Let's discuss one of the acute complications of diabetes, known as diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA for short, which can occur in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Now recall that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. And as such, there's an autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas, which prevents the pancreas from producing and secreting insulin. Therefore, there is an absolute insulin deficiency in type 1 diabetes. But what exactly does this mean for the body? To get a better understanding, let's think about insulin requirements as a balancing act with energy needs. Now the goal here is to keep the balance in balance. As the energy requirements of the body go up, insulin is needed to take the glucose out of the blood and store it throughout the body. Normally in individuals without type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is able to produce enough insulin to keep up with any amount of energy requirement. But how does this change is someone has type 1 diabetes? Well since their pancreas cannot produces as much insulin, they have an absolute insulin deficiency. Now for day-to-day activities, this may not actually cause any problems, because the small amount of insulin that is produced is able to compensate and keep the balance in balance. However, over time, as type 1 diabetes worsens, and less insulin is able to be produced, then the balance becomes slightly unequal. And this results in the sub-acute or mild symptoms of type 1 diabetes such as fatigue, because the body isn Continue reading >>

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

EDIT: My very first century upvote. Thank you ALL for your upvotes and encouragement! One word: insulin. Insulin is a kind of hormone produced by your body to keep your blood sugar level under control. Whenever you eat, your body starts digesting the food and releases tiny bouts of micronutrients (glucose, fatty acids or amino acids) into your blood stream. To counter this increase, your body triggers an insulin response to instruct the liver to absorb the extra amount of glucose to bring your blood sugar level to normal. As insulin is a hormone, it becomes tricky because different people react differently to hormones. Some people are very sensitive to a certain kind of hormone. Other people can be virtually immune to that kind of hormone. Same for insulin. In your case it sounds like your body is very sensitive to insulin. Either your body produces more insulin than normal, or your body reacts more sensitively to a given level of insulin. Either way, your liver would overwork to bring down your blood glucose level below normal in the short term, until it slowly recovers back to the normal level. This short term overshoot of blood glucose reduction causes fatigue and lethargy. See more: Sugar crash (Wikipedia)- A second possibility is that your diet is typically full of high GI food. GI stands for glycemic index which measures how much of insulin response a particular type of food triggers. The lower the GI, the less insulin required by your body to digest that food. Low GI food is typically slow-digesting food such as whole grain as opposed to refined grain, ie complex carb vs simple sugar. Vegetables are also low GI as it contains very few simple carbohydrates. In fact, most natural food tends to be complex and thus slower to digest and low GI; modern processed food t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis With Hyperglycemia In Heavy Drinkers: A Report Of 12 Cases.

Ketoacidosis With Hyperglycemia In Heavy Drinkers: A Report Of 12 Cases.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Heavy alcohol intake (> 45 g daily) might be a cause of diabetes. The short-term risks of heavy alcohol intake include ketoacidosis, glucose intolerance and pancreatitis. Alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) in combination with hyperglycemia mimics diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). We described the characteristics of heavy drinkers with ketoacidosis and hyperglycemia but without a prior history of diabetes. METHODS: Twelve habitually heavy drinkers who had not been previously diagnosed as diabetes were identified by reviewing the records of diabetic patients admitted to Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from 1989 to 1992. All of them met DKA criteria. RESULTS: Elevated glycohemoglobulin (HbAlc) level is an indicator for the diagnosis of diabetes. Among these 12 patients, 10 had elevated levels of HbAlc and 2 had normal HbAlc levels. Of these 2 patients, 1 had an elevated level of HbAlc 6 months later; the other who was a female who after observation, had normal levels of HbAlc and glucose for the follow-up of two years. CONCLUSION: We found that most heavy drinkers with both ketoacidosis and hyperglycemia also had diabetes as indicated by high levels of HbAlc. The only female patient had normal HbAlc and was diagnosed as AKA rather than DKA. Continue reading >>

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication typically faced by people with type-1 diabetes, which occurs when body starts running out of insulin. This condition can leave the patient in coma or even death if not treated immediately. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when body is lacking lacking insulin to allow sufficient glucose to enter cells. Therefore the body absorbs energy by burning fatty acids and in turn produce acidic ketone bodies. Blood containing high levels of ketone bodies can cause serious illness. Diabetic ketoacidosis is itself a symptom of undiagnosed type-1 diabetes. Other symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: 1. Dehydration 2. Vomiting 3. Nausea 4. Blurred vision 5. Fatigue & sleepiness 6. Frequent urination 7. Rapid heartbeat 8. Unusual smell on the breath (similar to that of pear drops) 9. Confusion and disorientation 10. Hyperventilation or deep laboured breathing 11. Coma The symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually develop over a 24-hour period if blood glucose levels are and remain very high (hyperglycemia). Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

By Debra A. Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE, CLVT, OTR/L, SCLV What Is Hyperglycemia? In relation to diabetes, hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the American Diabetes Association. It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease, talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Complications from Hyperglycemia Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Stroke (cerebral vascular disease) Heart attack or Congestive Heart Failure (coronary heart disease) Circulation disorders and possible amputation (peripheral vascular disease) When smaller blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Kidney disease (nephropathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Joseph Monks: Writer, Producer, and Film Director Joseph Monks, who has diabetic retinopathy, creates and produces films for his production company Sight Unseen Pictures. He is also the first blind filmmaker to direct a feature film. Says Joe, "I'm not uncomfortable with the term 'blind.' I'm not thrilled about it, of course, but it's accurate. The lights went out for me in early 2002 as a result of diabetic retinopathy—the death of my retinas. It is what it is, so when it happened, I decided that I wasn't going to let it put an en Continue reading >>

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