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Is Ketoacidosis Fatal

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

- [Voiceover] Oftentimes we think of diabetes mellitus as a chronic disease that causes serious complications over a long period of time if it's not treated properly. However, the acute complications of diabetes mellitus are often the most serious, and can be potentially even life threatening. Let's discuss one of the acute complications of diabetes, known as diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA for short, which can occur in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Now recall that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. And as such, there's an autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas, which prevents the pancreas from producing and secreting insulin. Therefore, there is an absolute insulin deficiency in type 1 diabetes. But what exactly does this mean for the body? To get a better understanding, let's think about insulin requirements as a balancing act with energy needs. Now the goal here is to keep the balance in balance. As the energy requirements of the body go up, insulin is needed to take the glucose out of the blood and store it throughout the body. Normally in individuals without type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is able to produce enough insulin to keep up with any amount of energy requirement. But how does this change is someone has type 1 diabetes? Well since their pancreas cannot produces as much insulin, they have an absolute insulin deficiency. Now for day-to-day activities, this may not actually cause any problems, because the small amount of insulin that is produced is able to compensate and keep the balance in balance. However, over time, as type 1 diabetes worsens, and less insulin is able to be produced, then the balance becomes slightly unequal. And this results in the sub-acute or mild symptoms of type 1 diabetes such as fatigue, because the body isn Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What You Need To Know

Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What You Need To Know

Diabetes can be hard to manage, but not properly controlling the disease can have dangerous and potentially deadly consequences. Ketoacidosis is one of them. This condition happens in people who don’t have enough insulin in their body, perhaps because they have not taken some of their insulin shots. The U.S. National Library of Medicine explains that when insulin is lacking, and the body cannot use ingested sugar as a fuel source, it starts to break down fat, which releases acids called ketones into the bloodstream. In large numbers, those ketones are poisonous and can cause deep, rapid breathing, dry skin and mouth, frequent thirst, a flushed face, headache, nausea, stomach pain, muscle stiffness, muscle aches, frequent urination, difficulty concentrating and fruity-smelling breath. If left untreated, the condition can be fatal, in part because it can eventually cause fluid to build up in the brain and for the heart and kidneys to stop working. There are ways to tell whether you have the condition or are approaching it, the Mayo Clinic says. A routine blood sugar test like the kind diabetics take all the time will show high blood sugar, and there are tests to measure the ketone levels in urine. The American Diabetes Association says that experts usually recommend using a urine test strip to check for ketones when blood glucose levels reach higher than 240 milligrams per deciliter. And when sick with a cold or flu, a person should “check for ketones every four to six hours” to be safe. That’s because infections or other illnesses can increase hormones like adrenaline and cortisol in the body, which then counter the work of insulin — “pneumonia and urinary tract infections are common culprits,” the Mayo Clinic warns. In addition to missed insulin shots and Continue reading >>

A Case Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Complicated By Fatal Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis

A Case Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Complicated By Fatal Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is one of the most serious acute complications of diabetes mellitus. Arterial thrombosis complicating diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a relatively common concomitant life-threatening illness. However, acute abdominal aortic thrombosis in DKA is very rare. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with abdominal aortic thrombus complicating DKA. She was brought to our hospital because of loss of consciousness. Her initial laboratory examination showed that glucose was 407 mg/dl, ketone bodies were positive, and pH was 6.91. Thus, we diagnosed her as having diabetic ketoacidosis. However, physical examination revealed pulseless femoral arteries, and laboratory testing revealed elevated lactate, D-dimer, and serum potassium levels. She complained of abdominal pain and had a bloody stool after admission. Initial non-contrast computed tomography (CT) did not show the occlusion of the arteries. Eighteen hours after admission, we found severe cyanosis of her bilateral lower limbs, and the contrast-enhanced CT revealed the thrombus in abdominal aorta extending into the bilateral common iliac arteries. This case indicates that DKA can be complicated by thrombosis. We should maintain a high index of suspicion for thrombosis in patients with DKA. Continue reading >>

What's An Unforgettable Statement That Your Boss Told You?

What's An Unforgettable Statement That Your Boss Told You?

I sucked at my work. I failed to complete most tasks on time. My peers would joke about how me to sticking to a deadline was akin to a politician living up to his word. I would put in 10 — 12 hours each day. But I never moved forward. One day, my boss emailed me asking for a list of tasks I perform during that day. I freaked out. Surely I was going to lose my job. I sent him my list after 3 days — after all, I had to live up to my reputation of missing deadlines. I didn’t sleep that night. The next day, my boss called me into his cabin. This is it, I thought. I’m gonna get fired for the first time in my life. I should start preparing for the handover process. But that didn’t happen. He made me sit down and offered a glass of water. Then he said, “Vishal, I noticed you cannot perform important tasks. You do a hundred things, but I can’t see any results.” “I try sir, but I keep getting burdened with additional work,” I said. Beads of sweat formed on my brow despite the cool temperature in his cabin. “Team members tell me their work is urgent. I know I get distracted. But I want to help everyone. When I try to say ‘no’, it doesn’t work. Yesterday Nishant scolded me for turning down his work.” The last sentence was a (harmless) lie. But hey, I was trying to defend myself. The ABCD of the Professional World I think my boss saw through the lie. Because he smiled and said, “Vishal, today I’ll share a piece of wisdom with you, which I got from the boss I learned the most from. It’s this: When you work in the corporate, prioritize your work as ABCD. A — Apna kaam (your own work) B — Boss ka kaam (your boss’ work) C — Company ka kaam (your organization’s work) D — Doosron ka kaam (others’ work).” How to Apply ABCD 1. Apna Kaam P Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Fatal Cerebral Edema

Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Fatal Cerebral Edema

Abstract One case of diabetic ketoacidosis with irreversible cerebral edema in a 10-year-old boy is presented. Death ensued in spite of apparently adequate fluid, electrolyte, and insulin therapy, and it followed a brief period of clinical and chemical improvement suddenly and unexpectedly. Although the pediatric literature makes no note of this syndrome, a review of the general medical literature does reveal some scattered case reports which deal with a similar pattern. The pathogenesis is discussed with several mechanisms presented as possible factors. Suggestions are made regarding modification of therapy, but these are admittedly tentative and require further studies. Abstract The topical use of isopropyl alcohol to reduce fever in children is a common procedure in pediatric practice. Deep coma has been reported in two children, presumably from inhalation of the alcohol during sponging procedures in poorly ventilated areas.1,2 Absorption through the skin has not been reported to be a significant portal of entry.3 The toxic effects of ingested isopropanol in humans are reported to be similar to those of ethanol, but they occur at lower blood concentrations.4 The lethal dose for adults of ingested 70% isopropyl alcohol has been estimated to be 240 ml.5 The following case is reported as an example of coma in an infant following injudicious topical application of isopropanol for the relief of fever. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Cats The term “ketoacidosis” refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies.” Meanwhile, diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. Typically, the type of condition affects older cats; in addition, female cats are more prone diabetes with ketoacidosis than males. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the cat's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your cat’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. He or she will then perform a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC). The most consistent finding in patients with diabetes is higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. If infection is present, white blood cell count will also high. Other findings may include: high liver enzymes, high blood cholesterol levels, accumulation in the blood of nitrogenous waste products (urea) that are usually excreted in the urine (azotemia), low sodium levels Continue reading >>

Is Type 1 Diabetes More Dangerous Than Type 2?

Is Type 1 Diabetes More Dangerous Than Type 2?

Type 1 diabetes results from a rheumatoid-like autoimmune reaction in which one’s own body attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that normally produce insulin. Type 1 is a disease in which the patient in a relatively short time has no insulin production. All patients with type 1 diabetes can also develop a serious metabolic disorder called ketoacidosis when their blood sugars are high and there is not enough insulin in their body. Ketoacidosis can be fatal unless treated as an emergency with hydration and insulin. Type 2 diabetes rates are growing dramatically in the United States and Western Europe. Type 2 is the result of the muscles and other tissues of the body developing a resistance to insulin produced by the beta cells of the pancreas. The pancreas first tries to overcome this resistance to insulin by making more insulin. The blood sugar goes up as a patient’s body is no longer able to make enough insulin. Most patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are overweight or obese. For most, but not all, maintenance of a normal weight and a good diet will prevent development of type 2 diabetes. Most type 2 diabetes is diagnosed after age 40. For this reason, many have referred to type 2 as adult-onset diabetes mellitus. This latter name has lost favor as the obesity epidemic has caused a number of people to be diagnosed with type 2 as early as 10 or 11. Type 2 can often be treated with diet modification and can improve significantly with weight loss and exercise. Some patients will be effectively treated with medications such as metformin that increase peripheral sensitivity of organs to insulin. Still more severe disease will require oral medications that encourage the pancreas to make more insulin such as glyburide or glipizide So Continue reading >>

Fatal Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Antipsychotic Medication.

Fatal Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Antipsychotic Medication.

Abstract Hyperglycemia and new onset diabetes have been described with certain antipsychotic medications and some of the initial presentations are fatal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). We report 17 deaths due to DKA in psychiatric patients treated with second generation antipsychotic medications. Death certificates and toxicology data were searched for DKA and hyperglycemia. We reviewed the medical examiner records which included the autopsy, toxicology, police, and medical examiner investigators' reports. The decedents ranged in age from 32 to 57 years (average 48 years). There were 15 men and two women. The immediate cause of death was DKA in all. The psychiatric disorders included: 10 schizophrenia, three bipolar/schizophrenia, two bipolar, and two major depression. The most frequent atypical antipsychotic medications found were quetiapine and olanzapine followed by risperidone. In 16 deaths, we considered the medication as primary or contributory to the cause of death. KEYWORDS: antipsychotic medication; atypical antipsychotics; diabetes; fatality; forensic pathology; forensic sciences; ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

A Clinical Case Of Clozapine-induced Fatal Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Clinical Case Of Clozapine-induced Fatal Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Clozapine, a second generation medication, has become the atypical antipsychotic drug of choice for refractory or treatment-resistant schizophrenia. In addition to the high risk of agranulocytosis and seizures, clozapine treatment is increasingly associated with significant metabolic effects, such as hyperglycemia, central weight gain and adiposity, hypertriglyceridemia, and elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A potentially life-threatening complication of altered metabolism is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This report details a case of fatal DKA in a schizophrenic patient undergoing treatment with clozapine. An African–American male in his 20s with a medical history significant for schizophrenia was presented to the psychiatric inpatient ward with severe paranoid thoughts and aggressive behavior. After trials of risperidone, olanzapine, and haloperidol—all of which failed to adequately control his psychotic symptoms—clozapine titration was initiated and he showed significant improvement. Weight gain was observed throughout hospitalization, but all blood and urine test results showed no metabolic or hematological abnormalities. The patient was discharged for outpatient treatment on clozapine (125 mg morning and 325 mg evening) along with divalproex sodium and metoprolol. Six days post-discharge, the patient died. A medical autopsy later ruled that the death was due to DKA without any evidence of contributory injuries or natural disease. Significant increase in body mass index from 28.7 to 33.5 was observed during hospitalization. The blood glucose level, measured after his death, was found to be 500 mg/dL. Altered metabolism due to clozapine can lead to dyslipidemia-mediated-pancreatic-beta-cell damage, decreased insulin secretion as well as insulin resis Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complications of untreated diabetes. In this complication, severely insufficient insulin levels in the body results into high blood sugar that leads to the production and buildup of ketones in the blood. These ketones are slightly acidic, and large amounts of them can lead to ketoacidosis. If remained untreated, the condition leads to diabetic coma and may be fatal. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) gets triggered by a stressful event on the body, such as an illness or severe lack of insulin. DKA is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. In some cases, identification of DKA is the first indication that a person has diabetes. Early Sluggish and extreme tiredness Fruity smell to breath (like acetone) Extreme thirst, despite large fluid intake Constant urination/bedwetting Extreme weight loss Presence of Oral Thrush or yeast infections that fail to go away Muscle wasting Agitation / Irritation / Aggression / Confusion Late At this stage, Diabetic ketoacidosis reaches a life-threatening level: Vomiting. Although this can be a sign of hyperglycemia and isn't always a late-stage sign, it can occur with or without ketoacidosis. Confusion Abdominal pain Loss of appetite Flu-like symptoms Unconsciousness (diabetic coma) Being lethargic and apathetic Extreme weakness Kussmaul breathing (air hunger). In this condition, patients breathe more deeply and/or more rapidly The major risk factors accelerating on set of diabetic ketoacidosis include the following: Diabetes mellitus: Type 1 diabetics are at a higher risk of DKA, because they must rely on outside insulin sources for survival. DKA can occur in patients with type 2, particularly in obese children. Age: DKA may occur at any age, but younger people below 19 years of age are more susceptib Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Explained

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Explained

Twitter Summary: DKA - a major complication of #diabetes – we describe what it is, symptoms, who’s at risk, prevention + treatment! One of the most notorious complications of diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. First described in the late 19th century, DKA represented something close to the ultimate diabetes emergency: In just 24 hours, people can experience an onset of severe symptoms, all leading to coma or death. But DKA also represents one of the great triumphs of the revolution in diabetes care over the last century. Before the discovery of insulin in 1920, DKA was almost invariably fatal, but the mortality rate for DKA dropped to below 30 percent within 10 years, and now fewer than 1 percent of those who develop DKA die from it, provided they get adequate care in time. Don’t skip over that last phrase, because it’s crucial: DKA is very treatable, but only as long as it’s diagnosed promptly and patients understand the risk. Table of Contents: What are the symptoms of DKA? Does DKA occur in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What Can Patients do to Prevent DKA? What is DKA? Insulin plays a critical role in the body’s functioning: it tells cells to absorb the glucose in the blood so that the body can use it for energy. When there’s no insulin to take that glucose out of the blood, high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) results. The body will also start burning fatty acids for energy, since it can’t get that energy from glucose. To make fatty acids usable for energy, the liver has to convert them into compounds known as ketones, and these ketones make the blood more acidic. DKA results when acid levels get too high in the blood. There are other issues too, as DKA also often leads to the overproduction and release of hormones like glucagon and adrenaline Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Facts Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that may occur in people who have diabetes, most often in those who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. It involves the buildup of toxic substances called ketones that make the blood too acidic. High ketone levels can be readily managed, but if they aren't detected and treated in time, a person can eventually slip into a fatal coma. DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. Although much less common, DKA can occasionally occur in people with type 2 diabetes under extreme physiologic stress. Causes With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body's cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can't get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn't available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body's metabolic processes aren't able Continue reading >>

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