diabetestalk.net

Is Ketoacidosis Deadly

Share on facebook

Diabetes Blood Sugar *Type 1 Diabetes Blood Sugar Over 500 | Type 2 Diabetes Blood Sugar Over 400 If You Want to REVERSE your Type 2 Diabetes and never worry about your blood sugar again, heres what you need: A recent medical breakthrough at Newcastle University has revealed 3 Proven Steps to Reverse Type-2 Diabetes. Click the link below to find out more. http://tinyurl.com/DiabetesDestroyerz -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Diabetes Blood Sugar *Type 1 Diabetes Blood Sugar Over 500 | Type 2 Diabetes Blood Sugar Over 400 When you leave your doctors office, do you ever wonder what hes not telling you? Every appointment, he tells you to eat less sugar and go on more walks, but arent there other ways to get your diabetes under control? Heres 3 tricks to manage your diabetes that your doctor wont tell you: 1- Eat More Fat You read that right. Eat more fat. Thats because fat helps your body absorb insulin. That means the more fat you eat, the easier itll be to manage your blood sugar. But heres the kicker: Its got to be the right type of fat. Youre looking for Unsaturated Omega-3 Fat. Heres some great sources: Fish

Is It Really Required To Control Blood Sugar In Type 1 Diabetes?

If you don’t control your blood sugar with Type 1 Diabetes, you will die much sooner than is normal. That is a fact, not advice. If you are willing to die much earlier than anticipated, then of course you can choose to not control your blood sugar. It’s your choice and you have the ability to commit suicide very slowly. If you have no one in your life who cares about you or depends on you, I see nothing wrong with your choice. If you have family and friends who will miss you, I think you’re being silly. If you have dependents such as children or pets, I think you’re being irresponsible and childish. It is entirely possible to use a fixed dosage of insulin and survive because that’s exactly what people did for a long time. They ate carefully chosen meals and that went fine. If you’re willing to consume the exact same grams of carbs at the same time each day and not exercise, that might be an option for you. Presumably your food will get boring and your lifestyle may suffer but it’s technically feasible, just not recommended because of how constricting it is. However, there is no method of living that will save you from having to dedicate any thought to the management o Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Liang-Hai Sie

    Nothing to do with his diabetes, more with his molar problem?
    He might have contracted a foodborne infection, often seen when living under less than optimal hygienic circumstances... That can also be a viral infection e.g. acute viral gastro-enteritis, viral hepatitis (there are so many, A and e aren't transfered by blood contact) etc. etc.
    For his health, he better take good care of his diabetes, if not can get blind, have a heart attack, a stroke, or terminal end stage kidney disease (in the US 1 out of 3 is due to diabetes!). Many not well educated diabetics aren't motivated to do anything about controling their diabetes since it doesn't cause any symptom, and wait until catastrophe strikes, by then having been so much damaged that all we docs can do is minimal damage control, too late: Complications of diabetes

  2. Michael Soso

    If he has a history of nauseating headache, the headaches could simply be migraine attacks, unrelated to his diabetes and tooth problem. This is the least alarming interpretation of the facts provided.
    Unfortunately, other possibilities are much more concerning. If he has a dental abscess, the possible complications in the presence of poorly controlled diabetes are numerous, as other posters have indicated. Visits to a dentist and a doctor would appear warranted.
    I hope it all proves to be minor and resolves without much trouble. The comments provided by healthcare providers describe some of the more serious problems that might develop. The Original Poster needs to read these judiciously.
    I suspect some physicians reading your question would immediately want to send a MedEvac helicopter to airlift your father to a major urban hospital. To grossly understate the situation, physicians are worrywarts. If you show us a hangnail, we're already worrying about your imminent need for amputation before you die from gangrene and sepsis because, believe me, we've seen it. No symptom, no matter how seemingly innocuous to a patient, is casually dismissed by a thoughtful doctor. To the contrary, we can't suppress the reflexive review of all the horrors we might be overlooking.
    Consequently, I hope the comments your question elicits are helpful rather than simply terrifying. Best wishes to you and your father.

  3. Steve Rapaport

    Could mean several things, but one of them is deadly dangerous, diabetes related, and easily preventable, so I'd suggest preventing that one right away.
    Tell your dad to drink lots of water, and take a bit of insulin if he has some.
    That way if he's working his way up to a Diabetic Ketoacidosis or an HHS attack, you can head it off right away. They both result from inadequate insulin levels and inadequate water levels, and can be triggered by an inflammation or infection (such as a tooth problem).
    More on both here: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

diabetes blood sugar blood sugar levels high blood sugar levels high blood sugar levels symptoms بلڈ شوگر بڑھنے سے جسم پر کیا اثرات مرتب ہوتے ہیں؟ high blood sugar definition high glucose levels diabetes symptoms type 2 diabetes symptoms type 1 diabetes symptoms early symptoms of diabetes diabetes symptoms in men prediabetes symptoms gestational diabetes symptoms symptoms of diabetes type 2 in adults symptoms of diabetes in children diabetes causes diabetes definition diabetes wiki diabetes treatment diabetes signs diabetes wikipedia type 2 diabetes diabetes mellitus how to reduce blood sugar level what level of blood sugar is dangerous? high blood sugar levels random blood sugar level blood sugar levels after eating low blood sugar levels blood sugar symptoms printable blood sugar chart blood sugar levels after eating high blood sugar levels low blood sugar levels random blood sugar level what level of blood sugar is dangerous? how to reduce blood sugar level normal blood sugar levels for elderly understanding blood sugar levels high blood sugar levels chart high blood sugar levels symptoms high blood sugar treatment high blood sugar diet hig

What Is To Be Done If Someone Has A Diabetic Attack Due To High Blood Sugar?

If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathing • Fruity sweet breath • Really thirsty • Drowsiness, leading to unresponsiveness if not treated Low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) • Weakness, faintness or hunger • Confusion and irrational behaviour • Sweating with cold, clammy skin • Rapid pulse • Trembling • Deteriorating level of response • Medical warning bracelet or necklace and glucose gel or sweets • Medication such as an insulin pen or tablets and a glucose testing kit What you need to do ‒ for high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) Call an ambulance straight away for medical help and say that you suspect hyperglycaemia. While you wait for help to arrive, keep checking their breathing, pulse and level of response. If they lose responsiveness at any point, open their airway, check their breathing and prepare to treat someone who’s become unresponsive. What you need to do ‒ for low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) Help them sit down. If they have their own glucose gel, he Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Liang-Hai Sie

    Nothing to do with his diabetes, more with his molar problem?
    He might have contracted a foodborne infection, often seen when living under less than optimal hygienic circumstances... That can also be a viral infection e.g. acute viral gastro-enteritis, viral hepatitis (there are so many, A and e aren't transfered by blood contact) etc. etc.
    For his health, he better take good care of his diabetes, if not can get blind, have a heart attack, a stroke, or terminal end stage kidney disease (in the US 1 out of 3 is due to diabetes!). Many not well educated diabetics aren't motivated to do anything about controling their diabetes since it doesn't cause any symptom, and wait until catastrophe strikes, by then having been so much damaged that all we docs can do is minimal damage control, too late: Complications of diabetes

  2. Michael Soso

    If he has a history of nauseating headache, the headaches could simply be migraine attacks, unrelated to his diabetes and tooth problem. This is the least alarming interpretation of the facts provided.
    Unfortunately, other possibilities are much more concerning. If he has a dental abscess, the possible complications in the presence of poorly controlled diabetes are numerous, as other posters have indicated. Visits to a dentist and a doctor would appear warranted.
    I hope it all proves to be minor and resolves without much trouble. The comments provided by healthcare providers describe some of the more serious problems that might develop. The Original Poster needs to read these judiciously.
    I suspect some physicians reading your question would immediately want to send a MedEvac helicopter to airlift your father to a major urban hospital. To grossly understate the situation, physicians are worrywarts. If you show us a hangnail, we're already worrying about your imminent need for amputation before you die from gangrene and sepsis because, believe me, we've seen it. No symptom, no matter how seemingly innocuous to a patient, is casually dismissed by a thoughtful doctor. To the contrary, we can't suppress the reflexive review of all the horrors we might be overlooking.
    Consequently, I hope the comments your question elicits are helpful rather than simply terrifying. Best wishes to you and your father.

  3. Steve Rapaport

    Could mean several things, but one of them is deadly dangerous, diabetes related, and easily preventable, so I'd suggest preventing that one right away.
    Tell your dad to drink lots of water, and take a bit of insulin if he has some.
    That way if he's working his way up to a Diabetic Ketoacidosis or an HHS attack, you can head it off right away. They both result from inadequate insulin levels and inadequate water levels, and can be triggered by an inflammation or infection (such as a tooth problem).
    More on both here: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Is Diabetes a threatening illness? By Dr Pratul Priyadarshi, M.D. (Medicine), Diabetologist Video by AddoDoc.com

Is Type One Diabetes As Serious An Illness As Type 2?

Type 1 diabetes is arguably MORE serious than Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. That means that it is chronic and incurable. Type 1 diabetics do not produce insulin at all. Type 2 is caused by overexposure and thus developed resistance to the insulin. You can, if you are vigilant, recover insulin sensitivity. Like Type 2 diabetes going into remission, to use familiar terms. Type 1 diabetics do not have that chance. Type 2 diabetes is sometimes treated with insulin in vet serious cases, but can usually be controlled with oral medications, diet, and exercise. Type 1 diabetes can ONLY be controlled with artificial insulin injections. Since Type 1 usually emerges in childhood, Type 1 diabetics get to look forward to life as a pincushion. Forever. Both are considered diabetes, but Type 1 and Type 2 are completely and utterly unrelated diseases that just happen to share a set of symptoms. It’s like comparing a child born without a leg to an adult who broke their leg in an accident. Sure, neither of them can walk, but the reasons that neither can walk are completely different, treated differently, and only one of the two ever has the chance to walk unaided in t Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Liang-Hai Sie

    Nothing to do with his diabetes, more with his molar problem?
    He might have contracted a foodborne infection, often seen when living under less than optimal hygienic circumstances... That can also be a viral infection e.g. acute viral gastro-enteritis, viral hepatitis (there are so many, A and e aren't transfered by blood contact) etc. etc.
    For his health, he better take good care of his diabetes, if not can get blind, have a heart attack, a stroke, or terminal end stage kidney disease (in the US 1 out of 3 is due to diabetes!). Many not well educated diabetics aren't motivated to do anything about controling their diabetes since it doesn't cause any symptom, and wait until catastrophe strikes, by then having been so much damaged that all we docs can do is minimal damage control, too late: Complications of diabetes

  2. Michael Soso

    If he has a history of nauseating headache, the headaches could simply be migraine attacks, unrelated to his diabetes and tooth problem. This is the least alarming interpretation of the facts provided.
    Unfortunately, other possibilities are much more concerning. If he has a dental abscess, the possible complications in the presence of poorly controlled diabetes are numerous, as other posters have indicated. Visits to a dentist and a doctor would appear warranted.
    I hope it all proves to be minor and resolves without much trouble. The comments provided by healthcare providers describe some of the more serious problems that might develop. The Original Poster needs to read these judiciously.
    I suspect some physicians reading your question would immediately want to send a MedEvac helicopter to airlift your father to a major urban hospital. To grossly understate the situation, physicians are worrywarts. If you show us a hangnail, we're already worrying about your imminent need for amputation before you die from gangrene and sepsis because, believe me, we've seen it. No symptom, no matter how seemingly innocuous to a patient, is casually dismissed by a thoughtful doctor. To the contrary, we can't suppress the reflexive review of all the horrors we might be overlooking.
    Consequently, I hope the comments your question elicits are helpful rather than simply terrifying. Best wishes to you and your father.

  3. Steve Rapaport

    Could mean several things, but one of them is deadly dangerous, diabetes related, and easily preventable, so I'd suggest preventing that one right away.
    Tell your dad to drink lots of water, and take a bit of insulin if he has some.
    That way if he's working his way up to a Diabetic Ketoacidosis or an HHS attack, you can head it off right away. They both result from inadequate insulin levels and inadequate water levels, and can be triggered by an inflammation or infection (such as a tooth problem).
    More on both here: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Can Diabetes Be Deadly?

    Diabetes, which affects the body’s use of insulin, has consequences for every system in the body — perhaps none more so than the heart. About 30 million Americans — more than 9 percent of the population — have diabetes, and the rates are on the rise. By 2050, one in three Americans is expected to have diabetes. Over time, the condition can lead to devastating consequences, such as blindness, kidney failure, and limb amputations. But the d ...

    diabetes Jan 4, 2018
  • Are Diabetes Deadly

    More than 24 million Americans have diabetes, and many people who have the disease don't know it. What can be done to reduce the risk of this devastating illness, which can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, and amputations? Quite a bit, says diabetes expert Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. The key, he says, is not to fall victim to common myths about the disease. Here are 10 of the worst. My ...

    diabetes Jan 4, 2018
  • Is Diabetes Deadly

    Diabetes causes 12 percent of deaths in the United States, making it the third-leading cause of death in the country, according to a new study published in PLOS ONE. According to the CDC, diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., causing about 4 percent of deaths. But researchers from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and Boston University contend official records are not accurately counting diabetes-attributable de ...

    diabetes Jan 3, 2018
  • Is Type 2 Diabetes A Deadly?

    With skyrocketing incidence rates that are expected to soar even higher in the future, diabetes is rapidly transforming the health landscape of the United States and other Western nations. It is no exaggeration to say that diabetes now looms as one of the most costly, destructive medical epidemics of the early twenty-first century. Those affected with diabetes face a host of insidious health threats that include heart disease, impotence, stroke, ...

    diabetes Jan 5, 2018
  • Is Ketoacidosis Deadly

    If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathing • Fruity sweet breath • Really thirsty • Drowsiness, leading to unresponsiveness if not treated Low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) • Weakness, faintness or hunger • Confusion and irrational behaviour ...

    ketosis Mar 29, 2018
  • Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Deadly?

    Type 2 diabetes (the most common form of the disease) is a deadly epidemic! It’s estimated that: 26 million people in America have diabetes 95 percent of those are afflicted with Type 2 diabetes And another 79 million are suspected as pre-diabetic (at risk of developing the disease) Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body carries too much excess weight. It’s this weight storage that damages the body’s ability to use insulin (the hormone that c ...

    diabetes Jan 4, 2018

More in ketosis