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Is Ketoacidosis Common

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Explained

Twitter Summary: DKA - a major complication of #diabetes – we describe what it is, symptoms, who’s at risk, prevention + treatment! One of the most notorious complications of diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. First described in the late 19th century, DKA represented something close to the ultimate diabetes emergency: In just 24 hours, people can experience an onset of severe symptoms, all leading to coma or death. But DKA also represents one of the great triumphs of the revolution in diabetes care over the last century. Before the discovery of insulin in 1920, DKA was almost invariably fatal, but the mortality rate for DKA dropped to below 30 percent within 10 years, and now fewer than 1 percent of those who develop DKA die from it, provided they get adequate care in time. Don’t skip over that last phrase, because it’s crucial: DKA is very treatable, but only as long as it’s diagnosed promptly and patients understand the risk. Table of Contents: What are the symptoms of DKA? Does DKA occur in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What Can Patients do to Prevent DKA? What is DKA? Insulin plays a critical role in the body’s functioning: it tells cells to absorb the gl Continue reading >>

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  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may Continue reading >>

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  1. sukale1975

    how common is diabetic ketoacidosis

    I was just hospitalized with DKA. I was in the hospital Thursday around 10 am and was released Saturday afternoon. First time I ever had DKA. Is this a once in a lifetime thing or is this something that will keep happening?

  2. CalgaryDiabetic

    I think it depends if your body is still producing endogenous insulin

  3. Nan OH

    The control of your Blood Glucose Level determines if you go into DKA. it is most common in a Type One diabetic but any diabetic can go into DKA if their numbers have been high enough for a long enough period of time. How high and how long is the variable for each person.
    So No it is not a one timer thing and Yes is could happen again or several more times.

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Moof's Medical Biochemistry Video Course: http://moof-university.thinkific.com/... In this video, I describe how Ketone Bodies are oxidized for energy. The liver makes ketone bodies that travel through the blood to extrahepatic tissues, where they are oxidized in the mitochondrial matrix to give energy. The pathway begins with D--Hydroxybutyrate, as it is oxidized to Acetoacetate by the same D--Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase reaction (except in reverse). The Acetoacetate is then activated to Acetoacetyl-CoA by -Ketoacyl-CoA Transferase (also known as Thiophorase); this second step takes a Coenzyme A from Succinyl-CoA (an intermediate of the Krebs Cycle). The Acetoacetyl-CoA is then cleaved into two Acetyl-CoA molecules that can go through the Krebs Cycle to be oxidized, resulting in energy that cell can use. Ultimately, the liver is basically sending Acetyl-CoA that it isnt metabolizing to other tissues (by way of Ketone Bodies in the blood) so that those other tissues can utilize the Acetyl-CoA. However, sometimes, the extrahepatic tissues do not oxidize the ketone bodies rapidly enough to keep up with the pace at which they are arriving from the blood. This is a problem described in more detail in the next video in the series. For a suggested viewing order of the videos, information on tutoring, personalized video solutions, and an opportunity to support Moof University financially, visit MoofUniversity.com, and follow Moof University on the different social media platforms. Don't forget to LIKE, COMMENT, and SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Cats The term “ketoacidosis” refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies.” Meanwhile, diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. Typically, the type of condition affects older cats; in addition, female cats are more prone diabetes with ketoacidosis than males. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the cat's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of y Continue reading >>

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  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

  4. -> Continue reading
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