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Is Keto Sustainable For Life

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

As the ketogenic diet gains popularity, it’s important to have a balanced discussion regarding the merits of this diet. Let me emphasize right out of the gate that this is not a diet without merits (excuse the double negative); in fact, it has significant therapeutic potential for some clinical pathologies. However, it is also a diet with inherent risk, as evidenced by the extensive list of adverse reactions reported in the scientific literature—and this has not yet been a thorough enough part of the public discussion on ketogenic diets. The AIP Lecture Series is a 6-week video-based, self-directed online course that will teach you the scientific foundation for the diet and lifestyle tenets of the Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first of a series of articles discussing various facets of a ketogenic diet with an inclination toward balancing the discussion of the pros and cons of this high-fat, low-carb, low/moderate-protein diet. My interest in this topic stems from concerns I have over its general applicability and safety, simultaneous with its growing popularity. I feel a moral and social obligation to share what I understand of these diets, from my perspective as a medical researcher. The dangers of a ketogenic diet was, in fact, the topic of my keynote presentation at Paleo F(x) this year (links to video will be provided once available). This series of articles will share the extensive research that I did in preparation for this presentation, including all of the topics covered during my talk as well as several topics that I didn’t have time to discuss (also see the free PDF Literature Review at the bottom of this post). For every anecdotal story of someone who has regained their health with a ketogenic diet, there’s a counterpoint story of someone who derai Continue reading >>

Ep. 54: Sustainable Keto With Leanne Vogel

Ep. 54: Sustainable Keto With Leanne Vogel

IN THIS EPISODE: Leanne is an ultra passionate Holistic Nutritionist and food blogger in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Her goal is to help people do away with feeling overpowered and controlled by food by giving them the tools they need to inject their lives with happiness, healthfulness, and a whole lot of dietary fat. She has spent over a decade revolutionizing her own perception of food and wellness by creating a life of kindness and acceptance toward herself! She is inspiring, honest, experienced, and HILARIOUS! I know you'll love her liberating and empowering approach almost as much as her innovative recipes (they are truly incredible)! So have a listen and learn all the ins and outs of a sustainable and empowered high fat lifestyle! Here are some of the gems you're in for: A personal fact she's never told anyone on a podcast before What made her so passionate about a high fat lifestyle How she felt as a vegan Why the keto that works for men doesn't always work for women Who will benefit from a ketogenic diet Who should not be using a ketogenic diet What her macronutrient ratios look like Why she doesn't count her kale... The one keto-approved food she avoids with GREAT results Whether or not she thinks it's necessary to stay in ketosis to see results A day in the life of her meals How to make salmon cakes (delicious!) Whether or not supplementing to stay in ketosis is beneficial The dietary combo that can make cheat days dangerous What "carb ups" are and why they might change your life The signs that you might need a carb up Why eating carbs at night is not always a terrible idea What she does before every meal to get in touch with her body How to know when you're in ketosis The sweet spot for measuring ketones The best tests for ketosis How to save lots of money whil Continue reading >>

Using A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss

Using A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss

Using A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss Weight loss is a billion dollar industry for one major reason, people are not getting sustainable results. If you are looking to lose some stubborn fat and you have stumbled across this article, chances are you have been doing your research. The internet is filled with millions of opinions on how to lose weight and get healthy. With skyrocketing rates of obesity and related health conditions in the US, eating less and exercising more usually just doesn’t cut it. Fortunately, you are in the right place now. Based on the latest research and my experience, I am going to explain to you why you should consider the ketogenic diet for weight loss. I love the ketogenic diet for so many reasons. Not only can it boost your mental and physical performance, but it naturally and safely promotes fat burning as well. Another plus is that following a ketogenic diet, in my opinion, is not as limiting as some other diet strategies. I’m here to tell you that losing weight is possible while still enjoying delicious food! Most people, especially those who have unsuccessfully experimented with a new diet, cringe at the thought of adopting a new way of eating. The way they see it, they have to starve themselves, avoid all their favorite foods, and be satisfied with limited results. To me this is a ridiculous way to live your life and why the ketogenic diet is such a game changer. On a ketogenic diet, you simply reduce carb intake and increase your consumption of healthy fats until your body learns to burn fat for energy over sugar. This metabolic shift is advantageous for the body, your metabolism, your hormones, and all while keeping you full naturally. Because fats are such an efficient fuel source, you get hungry less often, you cut cravings, and Continue reading >>

Should You Try The Ketogenic Diet?

Should You Try The Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet has become the rage for rapid weight loss recently, but is it worth giving it a try? As I do with any fad diet, especially ones that involve eliminating entire food groups, I examined this one with a healthy amount of skepticism. First, what is the ketogenic diet? You may recall the Atkins diet craze that preceded the South Beach Diet back in the late 90s/early 2000s – this is like a more extreme Atkins. Essentially, you slash the amount of carbs you are consuming down to just 2-4% of the calories you consume per day and focus on eating large amounts of fat. Your body primarily relies of carbohydrates to burn for energy. By cutting the amount of carbs you are consuming down to such a small amount, you force your body to begin to burn fat for energy – thus the weight loss results. Burning fat for energy – sounds great, right? Well, not so fast. First, it is very important to note that this is an incredibly unsustainable diet. As anyone who has tried Atkins or South Beach will tell you, you can cut out carbs…for a while. But long-term it’s just not doable. For most people, this is invitation to deprive and then overeat carbs when it finally gets to be too much. Such a diet is great for setting up a pattern of yo-yo dieting, which has been linked to heart disease and diabetes, as well as more weight gain over time. Furthermore, if you don’t follow this diet completely, you won’t see the results, which makes it even less sustainable. Basically, you will lose significant weight quickly on a ketogenic diet, but you will regain it quickly as well – this is not a diet for long-term weight loss. If you are able to adhere to this diet in the long-term, the weight loss effects are likely to fade over time. Additionally, many experts say that this Continue reading >>

The 3 Most Surprising Things About My First Month Of Keto

The 3 Most Surprising Things About My First Month Of Keto

I’ve been reading about the keto diet/lifestyle for months. It’s basically a way of eating that shifts your body from burning sugar to fat for energy. It’s a high fat, moderate protein, low carbohydrate diet. Contrary to what you probably think (because of the propaganda forced on us for the last 50 years about what foods are actually good for us) it is a very old and tried and true way to live and eat. You can read more extensively about it here, but its many benefits include: Controls your weight by changing what and when you eat Weight loss Lowers your body’s inflammation Lowers cholesterol and triglycerides Reduces appetite Increases muscle mass Lowers insulin levels Eliminates sugar cravings Optimizes your mitochondrial health Starves cancer cells Side Note: Ever since I graduated from medical school, I’ve been interested in nutrition. Mainly because I didn’t learn much AT ALL about it in school, oddly enough. That interest has driven me over the years to try every eating plan out there. When I was practicing medicine and my patients would ask questions about the South Beach Diet or Body For Life or Atkins, I wanted to be able to give first hand accounts of what I thought about them. So I jumped on all the bandwagons, at least for a time—mostly to learn first hand. And for most of my life, I did not struggle with weight. I’ve never been skinny but always pretty average. I’ve always loved exercise and food and I’ve never really struggled too much with either. Until my hormones began to change. That and a history of some mild PCOS & a little bit of insulin resistance and elevated blood sugars during pregnancy. In 2012, my mild issues became bigger issues when I had to have my gallbladder removed after about ten years of dealing with intermittent a Continue reading >>

Is Keto A Long Term Diet?

Is Keto A Long Term Diet?

You may have recently read a lot about the Keto Diet as it’s increasing in popularity and having ‘it’s day’ across media. After reading about it, you may be wondering if it is for you. As with all diets, I would recommend making long term lifestyle changes rather than doing a short term fad diet which can cause your weight to fluctuate and eventually you’ll probably end up back where you started. If you have read the benefits and side effects of the Keto Diet, and you understand the impact the diet may have on your body, you may be wondering whether the Keto Diet is a long term diet. This question as to whether or not it is a long term diet is one that has had much debate and technically there is no full research to say whether it is safe long term or not. The science behind the Keto Diet is relatively immature so essentially, you will have to make that conclusion yourself. To help you come to that conclusion I have put forward the below arguments – there have been many claims that the Keto Diet is not for the long term, but many of these claims have been disproven which would lead us to believe that it can be suitable for the long term. Some claim that by cutting down on carbs and limiting protein, your body won’t be getting all of the nutrients it needs. This however is not always true, especially if you are eating nutrient dense foods and wholefoods. If for example you eat fatty meat and lather your food in butter and oil (in order to hit your high fat goals), then you may find yourself missing out on key nutrients. If you eat quality lean meats with green vegetables, nuts and dairy, then you are more likely to have a nutrient dense diet and you won’t be missing out on nutrients. It’s essentially down to you to ensure that you eat a variety of whole Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Becoming Popular Weight-loss Plan

Ketogenic Diet Becoming Popular Weight-loss Plan

In the 1980s, health and nutrition experts waged a war against dietary fats. Food companies began to cash in by creating "fat-free" versions of popular foods. That trend continued into the 1990s and even into the new millennium. Now, a growing number of health experts, including some doctors and nutritionists, are finding that fat may not be the enemy after all, rather shifting the focus on reducing the consumption of too many carbohydrates. The shift in philosophy has caused a rise in popularity of a diet called the ketogenic diet, or keto, for short. What is Keto? The ketogenic diet is a variation of a low-carbohydrate diet, which encourages the process of ketosis. That, in turn, utilizes fat as the body's fuel rather than carbohydrates. "The level of carbohydrates that are consumed for a ketogenic diet are super-low," said Dr. John Thomas, owner and physician at On Point Primary Care. "Usually carb intake is at 5 percent, versus the normal diet of 45 to 65 percent in the makeup of macronutrients of proteins, carbohydrates and fats." Thomas explained that carbohydrate consumption has been what he believes to be a leading cause of many health problems. "All in all, we just consume, as Americans, way more carbohydrates than we need," he said. A ketogenic diet often is a more extreme reduction of carbs. Thomas said that this isn't always necessary to help. He recommends a less drastic approach. "The benefits for most people are just reducing their consumption to maybe moderate levels of carbohydrates and not the extreme," he said. Unlike other low-carb diets, the ketogenic diet focuses more on consuming a larger portion of fats, a moderate amount of protein and a very low amount of carbohydrates. "Often times the ketogenic diet has between 70 and 80 percent fat consumpti Continue reading >>

Is A Low-carb Diet Sustainable For Life?

Is A Low-carb Diet Sustainable For Life?

In 2012, I received a friendly comment from a reader who suggested that the lack of dieting success I was having at the time was probably due to my inability to stay with one particular low-carb diet plan long enough to reap results. The advice I received: Go on a low-carb, high-fat diet (LCHF) and give it six months or more to work before analyzing. This was similar to the advice I received from the zero-carb folks a few years ago. Despite the fact that I had gained about 20 pounds in the first three weeks and was experiencing abnormally high blood glucose levels, they told me to: eat only beef drink only water wait six months before reviewing the results The zero-carb forum participants didn't seem to care about the neuropathy that had come back. They were just sure that their way was the only way. The problem with this type of advice is that it doesn't work for everyone. I can see the wisdom in sticking to one particular plan for a certain stretch of time, before analyzing, but at this point in my weight loss journey, I had been doing low carb for 5 years. How much longer did I have to wait? Correcting metabolic issues isn't always as easy as lowering your carbohydrate level. For example, I am juggling: vertigo (vestimbular dysfunction or Meniere's Disease) celiac disease several food sensitivities Graves' Disease (hyperthyroidism) So my problems with sustainability are more complex than simply going back onto a very low-carb, high-fat diet, ignoring the physical consequences, and giving the plan six months to work -- no matter how much weight I regain. For those with autoimmune thyroid disease, that type of advice is dangerous. LCHF diets trigger my thyroid to overreact, creating too much Free T3, which causes my heart to race as well as puts me in starvation mode b Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Could Help Us Live Longer, But Could Also Lead To Weight Gain

Ketogenic Diet Could Help Us Live Longer, But Could Also Lead To Weight Gain

The ketogenic diet is based on the basic idea that the body will always burn glucose (which breaks down from the carbohydrates) before it burns ketones (which are the breakdown of fat). By replacing most of the carbs in our diet with fat, proponents say it can fast-track weight loss, curb appetite, treat various health ailments and increase athletic performance. The diet originated in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy, but became trendy in the fitness industry among those trying to shed and shred. Celebrities such as Gwyneth Paltrow and Kim Kardashian also tried chewing the fat. While the keto diet has been slammed as a fad and is known for its side effects including constipation and bad breath, new research suggests it can improve memory and lifespan. READ MORE: * Which diet is really best for you? Here's a dietitian's advice * Best and worst of the 10 most popular diets * Which diet is best for weight loss? In two new studies mice were fed either a ketogenic diet, a control diet, or a low-carb, high-fat diet (ketogenic is a more extreme version of low-carb and accounted for 89 to 90 per cent of total calorie intake in the studies) and put through tests of physical health, fitness and memory. In both studies the keto mice lived longer and showed memory improvements, while only one showed maintenance of physical fitness and strength as mice aged. For the benefits, however, there was a catch. Mice that stay on a keto diet eventually become obese. To avoid this the mice were cycled between regular diets and the keto diet. "This study demonstrates that energy-controlled, high-fat LCDs are not detrimental to health, but rather a KD extends lifespan and slows age-related decline in physiological function in mice," the study authors concluded. "It is most probable that th Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

CLEARLY the “eat less”, “eat low fat”, and “just eat everything in moderation” diets haven’t worked too well for most people. So, if you’re still trying to lose weight and keep it off, then maybe it’s time to try something that’s working for tens of thousands of people right now… The Ketogenic Diet. But is it all too good to be true? Yes, we believe Keto is fantastic for weight loss. We’ve just seen it work for way too many people (check out the success stories below). But it’s also not for everyone. So, in this post, we are giving you the real facts behind all the hype as well as real-life stories of people who have lost a lot of weight on Keto. PLUS, how to get started on Keto to lose weight in 5 EASY Steps. What is the Ketogenic Diet? THE HISTORY: Originally the Ketogenic diet was created as an effective treatment for epileptic children. BUT NOW: More and more people are finding that a Ketogenic diet has tons of benefits, including: a healthy way to lose weight, control blood sugar levels, improve your brain function, and potentially even reverse a myriad of health conditions. How does keto do this? The Keto diet puts your body into a powerful fat-burning metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. NUTRITIONAL KETOSIS: In nutritional ketosis, your body generally uses very few carbohydrates for energy. Instead, it switches to using ketones (which are produced from the breakdown of fats). That’s why the keto diet is often called a fat-burning diet… You can literally be burning your own body fat for energy! (It’s still unclear whether ketosis is the magical factor that makes a Keto diet so effective for weight-loss, but whatever it is, it seems to work!) So, how do we get into this nutritional ketosis state? You can get into nutritional k Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Weight Loss?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Weight Loss?

Share it: If you’ve been contemplating various weight-loss strategies, you may have run across the ketogenic diet. This dietary strategy, which is often used in a clinical setting to help improve seizure control in children with epilepsy, is picking up steam as an effective treatment for weight loss. But is it right for you? We turned to the experts to find out more. WHAT IS IT? The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis, where fat is burned for fuel instead of carbohydrate. (This isn’t to be confused with ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition typically caused by a lack of insulin in the body.) According to Dominic D’Agostino, a researcher at the University of South Florida who specializes in ketogenic diets, “The ‘classic ketogenic diet’ used originally for the management of drug-resistance seizures is a 4:1 ratio of fats to protein and carbohydrates.” That equates to about 80–90% fat, 5–15% protein and 5–10% carbohydrates. For weight loss, he says, this diet is typically modified “to allow a more liberal consumption of protein” (20–30%) with the same carbohydrate restriction. IS IT FOR YOU? Advocates of the ketogenic diet are quick to point out many of the benefits this diet can have for those looking to lose weight. “Rapid weight loss and a decrease in hunger are the most common and evident benefits,” says Kristen Mancinelli, MS, RD, author of “The Ketogenic Diet: A Scientifically Proven Approach to Fast, Healthy Weight Loss.” D’Agostino references promising studies that have been shown to “lower blood glucose levels, increase sensitivity to insulin, decrease inflammation and reduce triglyceride levels while raising HDL cholesterol.” READ MORE > 21 DIETIT Continue reading >>

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