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Is Hyperglycemia Diabetes?

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, can be a dangerous problem for individuals with diabetes. Although hyperglycemia is sometimes defined as a blood glucose reading above 180, everyone is different — and people have symptoms of hyperglycemia at different levels. In the short term, hyperglycemia can cause serious side effects, and may even become life threatening. For example, one sign of dangerously high blood glucose is ketones in your urine. Ketones are acids your body makes when it burns fat instead of glucose for energy. They can build up to toxic levels in your body. This condition is called ketoacidosis. Over the long term, high blood glucose can increase your chance of diabetes complications. Without glucose, your brain can’t function. So when ketoacidosis is severe, you can go into a coma, or even die. That’s why you need to be alert to the symptoms of hyperglycemia and act right away to correct it. Along with checking your blood glucose, watch out for the following symptoms: Extreme thirst Dry, itchy skin Frequent urination Blurry vision Extreme hunger Fatigue Because hyperglycemia tends to come on gradually, you may not notice these symptoms right away. A high reading on your glucose meter may be your first sign that blood glucose levels are running too high. Ketoacidosis symptoms Ketoacidosis may occur when hyperglycemia is severe. People with type 1 diabetes are at the greatest risk of ketoacidosis. That’s because people with type 2 diabetes usually have at least some insulin available to take glucose into the cells. Ketoacidosis symptoms include: Ketones in your urine A fruity odor on your breath Extreme thirst or hunger Nausea/vomiting Extreme drowsiness Stomach pain Body aches Call for advice or an appointment if: You can’t control your hyperg Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Whether you have type 1 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 1 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 1 diabetes. New to type 1 diabetes? Check out "Starting Point: Type 1 Diabetes Basics," which answers some of the basic questions about type 1 diabetes: what is type 1 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 1 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 1 diabetes, our patient-perspective column by Adam Brown, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, and some extra pages we hope you’ll find useful! Starting Point: Type 1 Diabetes Basics What is the risk of developing type 1 diabetes if it runs in my family? What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is disease in which the body can no longer produce insulin. Insulin is normally needed to convert sugar (also called glucose) and other food sources into energy for the body’s cells. It is believed that in people with type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system attacks and kills the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot control blood sugar, and people can suffer from dangerously high blood sugar levels (called hyperglycemia). To control their blood glucose levels, people with type 1 diabetes take insulin injections. Before the discovery of insulin, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence (and it still is for patients with poor access to insulin). Can Type 1 Diabetes Be Prevented? Unfortunately, the genetic and environmental triggers for the immune attack that causes type 1 diabetes are not well understood, althoug Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin ( type 1 diabetes ) or can't respond to insulin properly ( type 2 diabetes ). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: All of these need to be b Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is the medical term for a high blood sugar (glucose) level. It's a common problem for people with diabetes. It can affect people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as pregnant women with gestational diabetes. It can occasionally affect people who don't have diabetes, but usually only people who are seriously ill, such as those who have recently had a stroke or heart attack, or have a severe infection. Hyperglycaemia shouldn't be confused with hypoglycaemia, which is when a person's blood sugar level drops too low. This information focuses on hyperglycaemia in people with diabetes. Is hyperglycaemia serious? The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. But if you have diabetes, no matter how careful you are, you're likely to experience hyperglycaemia at some point. It's important to be able to recognise and treat hyperglycaemia, as it can lead to serious health problems if left untreated. Occasional mild episodes aren't usually a cause for concern and can be treated quite easily or may return to normal on their own. However, hyperglycaemia can be potentially dangerous if blood sugar levels become very high or stay high for long periods. Very high blood sugar levels can cause life-threatening complications, such as: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – a condition caused by the body needing to break down fat as a source of energy, which can lead to a diabetic coma; this tends to affect people with type 1 diabetes hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS) – severe dehydration caused by the body trying to get rid of excess sugar; this tends to affect people with type 2 diabetes Regularly having high blood sugar levels for long periods of time (over months or years) can result in permanent damage to parts Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar or glucose. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose into your cells to give them energy. Hyperglycemia happens when your body doesn't make enough insulin or can't use it the right way. People with diabetes can get hyperglycemia from not eating the right foods or not taking medicines correctly. Other problems that can raise blood sugar include infections, certain medicines, hormone imbalances, or severe illnesses. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

What is hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, occurs when there is too much sugar in the blood. When you have hyperglycemia for long periods of time, you can have damage to nerves, blood vessels, and other body organs. What are the causes of hyperglycemia? Skipping or forgetting your insulin or oral glucose-lowering medication Eating the wrong foods Eating too much food Infection Illness Increased stress Decreased activity What are the symptoms of hyperglycemia? It is important to know the early signs of hyperglycemia. If hyperglycemia is left untreated, it may develop into an emergency condition called ketoacidosis. Signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia include: Increased thirst Blurred vision Frequent urination Increased hunger Numbness or tingling in the feet Additional early symptoms include: Fatigue (feeling weak, tired) Sugar in the urine Weight loss Blood glucose of more than 180 mg/dl Vaginal and skin infections Slow-healing cuts and sores Continue reading >>

How Are Hyperglycemia And Diabetes Connected?

How Are Hyperglycemia And Diabetes Connected?

The term used to describe high blood glucose or blood sugar is hyperglycemia. When we eat food, the carbohydrate in food breaks down into sugar and goes into the bloodstream. The pancreas releases insulin when this happens. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that "unlocks" the body's cells, allowing the sugar go from the blood and into the cells. The cells in the body use this sugar for energy. When the body does not make any or enough insulin, or when the cells are unable to use the insulin correctly, blood sugar levels go up. Contents of this article: Hyperglycemia and diabetes Hyperglycemia is common in people with diabetes. People with prediabetes are also at an increased risk. Prediabetes refers to blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but are not as high as they are for diabetes. Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels two main ways. Either there is a lack of insulin, as is the case with type 1 diabetes, or the body doesn't respond properly to insulin. In prediabetes, it is usually due to the cells not responding correctly. In type 2 diabetes, it is usually a combination. Causes of hyperglycemia There are several causes of hyperglycemia that are related to diabetes: Though many causes are related to diabetes, there are additional factors that can contribute to hyperglycemia: Certain medications such as steroids Other pancreatic diseases Illness and stress can trigger hyperglycemia because the hormones that are produced to combat illness or stress can also cause blood sugar to rise. People do not have to have full-blown diabetes to develop hyperglycemia due to a severe illness. People with diabetes may need to take extra diabetes medication to keep their blood sugar levels stable during illness or stress. Symptoms of hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia can occur when blood sugar levels are too high. People develop hyperglycemia if their diabetes is not treated properly. Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. It is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health consequences. In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is released into the bloodstream, or the insulin cannot be used properly. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all. We need insulin to live. Without it, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood because it cannot be taken out and used by the body. Very high blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, leads to a number of symptoms. If blood sugar levels are too low, it is called hypoglycemia. When is blood sugar considered to be too high or too low? Slight fluctuations in blood sugar levels are completely normal and also happen on a daily basis in people who do not have diabetes. Between around 60 and 140 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) is considered to be healthy. This is equivalent to between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/L. “Millimole per liter” (mmol/L) is the international unit for measuring blood sugar. It indicates the concentration of a certain substance per liter. If type 1 diabetes is left untreated, people’s blood sugar levels can get very high, even exceeding 27.8 mmol/L (500 mg/dL). Such high levels are rather uncommon for type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar concentrations below 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) are considered to be too low. As you can see in the illustration below, there are no clear-cut borders between the normal range of blood sugar and high and low blood sugar. Signs of hyperglycemia People with type 2 diabetes do not always realize that their Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes & Hyperglycemia

Difference Between Diabetes & Hyperglycemia

The rate of diabetes in the United States increased nearly 167 percent between 1980 and 2011. Understanding the basics of diabetes is crucial for individuals who are interested in keeping this dangerous condition in check. Both diabetes and hyperglycemia are characterized by high blood sugar -- in fact, people with diabetes may occasionally become hyperglycemic -- but the causes and treatments for each condition are somewhat different. Video of the Day Diabetes is a disorder characterized by high amounts of sugar in the bloodstream that occurs as a result of a lack of insulin or insulin insensitivity -- and while there are a number of ways in which diabetes can be diagnosed, the use of the standardized blood tests are especially popular. Individuals who have an A1c level equal to or greater than 6.5 percent, a fasting plasma glucose level equal to or greater than 126 milligrams per deciliter or an oral glucose tolerance test level equal to or greater than 200 mg/dL after two hours of drinking a sweetened beverage -- or a random plasma glucose level of equal to or greater than 200 mg/dL -- may be diagnosed with diabetes. In most cases, tests will be performed at least twice to confirm the findings, notes the American Diabetes Association. As with diabetes, hyperglycemia is characterized by high amounts of sugar in the bloodstream -- and in fact, most healthy adults will experience a slight increase in blood sugar levels to greater than 100 mg/dL shortly after eating a meal. Unlike diabetes, however, hyperglycemia may not always be related to a lack of insulin or insulin sensitivity; instead, it can occur as the result of stress, chronic or acute illness, prescription or illegal medication use and even pregnancy. People who have been diagnosed with diabetes will likely ex Continue reading >>

What Happens If Sugar Is Given During Hyperglycemia

What Happens If Sugar Is Given During Hyperglycemia

First aid manuals say to givesugar to any confused person with diabetes. But you wouldn't know without blood testing whether they were having an episode of low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ) or high blood sugar ( hyperglycemia ). Giving sugar will help the person with low blood sugar get through their crisis. But what happens if you give someone with high blood sugar more sugar? The answer is that in the short term, nothing happens for the person with hyperglycemiathe sugar will not make the condition worse. However, that doesn't mean high blood sugar isn't a problem. Learning why this is the case starts with understanding how your body gets energy and the difference between what is happening during episodes of low blood sugar and high blood sugar. Alternative Fuels: Running on Sugar or on Fat The body basically runs on two different fuels: fat and sugar. The premium fuel is sugarit burns cleaner and much more efficiently. Every carbohydrate and protein you eat is eventually broken down into sugar for your cells to use as fuel. However, your body is a versatile engine. It can also use fat as a fuel. It's not clean burningkind of like the difference between high octane racing gas and coalbut it gets the job done in a pinch. Not all cells in your body are capable of using alternative fuel. Some of the cells are high-performance, and only the premium fuel will do. The brain is just such an elite machine. Brain cells cannot burn fat. When the bloodstream runs low on sugar, the body tries to save it for the brain. When the blood sugar gets too low, the brain starts to sputter and dieand the victim becomes dizzy, confused, and weak . Nothing will work other than sugar, the premium, high-octane racing fuel for the body. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is a different mechanical Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Type 2 Diabetes

Part 1 of 6 Highlights High blood glucose, or hyperglycemia, primarily affects those with diabetes. If left untreated it can lead to chronic complications, such as kidney disease or nerve damage. Good diabetes management and careful blood glucose monitoring are both effective ways of preventing hyperglycemia. High blood glucose, or hyperglycemia, can cause major health complications in people with diabetes over time. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia, including eating more carbohydrates than normal and being less physically active than normal. Regular blood sugar testing is crucial for people with diabetes, because many people do not feel the symptoms of high blood sugar. Part 2 of 6 Short-term symptoms of high blood sugar include: excessive thirst excessive urination increased urination at night blurry vision sores that won’t heal fatigue If you experience symptoms of hyperglycemia, it’s important that you check your blood glucose levels. Untreated high blood sugar can lead to chronic complications, such as eye, kidney, or heart disease or nerve damage. The symptoms listed above can develop over several days or weeks. The longer the condition is left untreated, the more severe the problem may become. Generally, blood glucose levels greater than 180 mg/dL after meals — or over 130 mg/dL before eating — are considered high. Be sure to check with your doctor to learn your blood sugar targets. Part 3 of 6 A number of conditions or factors can contribute to hyperglycemia, including: eating more carbohydrates than usual being less physically active than usual being ill or having an infection experiencing high levels of stress not getting the right dosage of glucose-lowering medication Part 4 of 6 There are several treatment methods available for hypergl Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Blood sugar control is at the center of any diabetes treatment plan. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is a major concern, and can affect people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes . There are two main kinds: Fasting hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 130 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) after not eating or drinking for at least 8 hours. Postprandial or after-meal hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 180 mg/dL 2 hours after you eat. People without diabetes rarely have blood sugar levels over 140 mg/dL after a meal, unless it’s really large. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar can cause damage to your nerves, blood vessels, and organs. It can also lead to other serious conditions. People with type 1 diabetes are prone to a build-up of acids in the blood called ketoacidosis. If you have type 2 diabetes or if you’re at risk for it, extremely high blood sugar can lead to a potentially deadly condition in which your body can’t process sugar. It's called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS). You’ll pee more often at first, and then less often later on, but your urine may become dark and you could get severely dehydrated. It's important to treat symptoms of high blood sugar right away to help prevent complications. Your blood sugar may rise if you: Eat too many grams of carbohydrates for the amount of insulin you took, or eat too many carbs in general Have an infection Are ill Are under stress Become inactive or exercise less than usual Take part in strenuous physical activity, especially when your blood sugar levels are high and insulin levels are low Early signs include: Increased thirst Trouble concentrating Frequent peeing Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blood sugar more than 180 mg/dL Ongoing high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And How To Treat It

Hyperglycemia And How To Treat It

What is hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, occurs when glucose is trapped in the bloodstream due to lack of insulin. Individual blood glucose ranges vary, so talk with your diabetes team about your threshold for high blood glucose levels. A reading above 160 mg/dL (8.9 mmol/L) indicates hyperglycemia according to the Joslin Diabetes Center, although symptoms may not be present until blood sugar levels reach 200 mg/dL or 11 mmol/L (Mayo Clinic). If left untreated, hyperglycemia may lead to severe dehydration, diabetic ketoacidosis, and coma. The effects of tong-term hyperglycemia include damage to the eyes, kidneys, nervous system and heart. Why does it occur? Taking too little insulin, under-counting carbohydrates at mealtimes, stress, not exercising as much as planned, fluctuating hormones and illness can all contribute to hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia can occur when when your body is under physical stress, like when you’re fighting an infection or other illness, if you’re recovering from an injury, or recently had surgery. Emotional stress also contributes to hyperglycemia as hormones produced in response to stress cause blood glucose levels to rise. Make a plan with your endocrinologist for sick days as your insulin needs may change (your pump may even have a “sick day” category in the basal settings). Keep a close eye on your blood sugar and check for ketones when you’re under the weather to prevent yourself from feeling the negative effects of hyperglycemia, too. Communicate with your diabetes team about how you’re feeling and ask questions about adjusting your insulin schedule. Sometimes hyperglycemia can occur when insulin has expired or if it “goes bad,” from being exposed to extreme heat or cold. Store your insulin within appropri Continue reading >>

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