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Is Honey Keto Friendly

Why Jerky Is Not Always Keto-friendly

Why Jerky Is Not Always Keto-friendly

Beef Jerky has Carbs?! If you ask most Keto’ers what some of their favorite low carb snacks are, chances are you’ll hear “jerky” as one of the most popular answers. But be careful, because most jerky out there isn’t necessarily Keto-friendly and low in carbs. In fact, if you look at some of the top national jerky brands, many have 10g carbs or more per 1 oz. serving. For most people following a Ketogenic diet, that’s half of your daily carbs! So why do these manufacturers add sugar and carbs to beef jerky? Let’s look at how most jerky is made to find the answer. Less Beef, More Sugar It takes 3-4lbs of beef to produce just 1lb of jerky, as the cooking process pulls moisture out of the beef, resulting in a much lighter finished product. By adding sugar, high fructose corn syrup, honey, or other liquid sweeteners, it not only increases the jerky’s carb count, but also weighs down the final product. So, by adding sugar, manufacturers can use less beef (the most expensive ingredient), and make up for the lost weight with sugar. Profit! Keto Carne- More Beef For Your Buck! Keto Carne is beef jerky in its purest form- made with no sugar, no preservatives, and nothing artificial. We started Keto Carne because it was difficult to find zero-carb, sugar-free beef jerky, and now we’re providing jerky that gives you more beef for your buck! Continue reading >>

17 Keto Salad Dressings (keto, Low-carb + Paleo)

17 Keto Salad Dressings (keto, Low-carb + Paleo)

A salad just isn’t a salad without the dressing. Am I right? Well, here you can take a look at all the salad dressings that I’ve found that are not only low-carb and keto, but paleo with dairy-free options as well. Okay, let’s get real. Salads can be boring (gasp!). Especially if you’re trying to stay low-carb by avoiding all of those pesky sugary carb-heavy dressings. Salads don’t have to be boring, though! There are so many variations that you can do, allowing the salad to be your canvas as you create a masterpiece of keto art! It’s all about having fun with it. If you’re not having fun, then something is wrong. Another great thing about salads is the fact that they can be as easy or complicated as you wish. It just takes a few simple ingredients to throw a salad together. Of course, you could go a little crazy with it too with an all-out elaborate salad meal, too. Whatever you decide to do, always try to have fun with it. Creativity can be hard work, so if you think that the meal planning is taking out all the joy out of your keto life, then you should check out my Balanced Keto Weekly Meal Plans. It takes the stress out of the process, so you can focus on being happy and healthy in your fat-fueled body! KETO SALAD DRESSINGS Like to keep it simple? This dressing is all about the simple! With just three easy ingredients, you’ll be able to throw this salad together in a jiffy. It’s the simple things that count, right? Burn, baby, burn that fat! Salad dressings are actually really great for keto because they are another opportunity to add some extra healthy fat to your meals without much work at all. Primal Kitchen Mayo (use FAT coupon code for 15% off) would be great in this recipe. Speaking of classics, it doesn’t get much more classic than good ol Continue reading >>

Keto Coconut Macaroons

Keto Coconut Macaroons

Every once in a while, I get a craving for something sweet. And when I say that, I really mean once in a while. One day, I was browsing my grocery store and noticed that there were some pre-packaged coconut macaroons for sale, highlighting the words, “Gluten-Free!” I took a look at the ingredient list and to my surprise, aside from the shit ton of sugar (it was the first ingredient), these weren’t half bad. I knew that I could make a much healthier version that would satisfy my dietary needs! Enter the Keto Coconut Macaroons. These Keto Coconut Macaroons make a delicious snack or dessert. Not only are these keto-friendly, but they are also suitable for primal and paleo diets. While the carb count is essentially fairly low, you can lower it even more by using a different sweetener that is low in carbs like Stevia or Erythritol. I personally prefer the taste of honey and prefer to bake/cook with minimally processed ingredients. If you want these to be more stable at room temperature, instead of using cocoa powder, melt some high-quality dark chocolate chips or bar. Just make sure you check the ingredients to make sure they don’t contain any ingredients you are avoiding (a lot of these have soy and dairy). These are packed with an awesome healthy fat content and totally satisfy any dessert cravings. What are you waiting for? Go make these! What’s your favorite dessert? Have you been able to find a suitable swap for your eating lifestyle? Comment below! Continue reading >>

Why A Keto Breakfast Beats Sugary Cereal

Why A Keto Breakfast Beats Sugary Cereal

Modern day breakfast shares little similarities with the traditional morning meal. A short century ago, our great-grandparents enjoyed a cooked family meal around the breakfast table. However, things are completely different now. For most people, breakfast no longer features fresh ingredients, and the food usually comes ready-made in a box. Popular cereal brands have taken over the “most important meal of the day” with devastating health consequences. This article discusses why a real food keto-style breakfast beats sugary cereal. A Brief History of Breakfast Throughout history, breakfast was never just one food as it is for many people now. In Britain, cold meats, fish and homemade bread were popular from medieval times until the latter half of the 20th century. A traditional breakfast in North America was also very different to now. In the early 1900s, and before widespread commercial food processing, American families relied on what they could grow, buy, or make themselves. Many families were living off the land and breakfasts typically consisted of whole grain cereals, meat, eggs, fruits, fish and homemade bread. Significantly, people thought that a breakfast consisting entirely of cereals was a poor man’s breakfast and one which was nutritionally lacking. The historical literature also discusses how people saw meals such as steak, eggs and oatmeal as the ultimate breakfast. As the 20th century progressed, food processing—and commercial advertising money—increased rapidly, leading to the ever-increasing popularity of cereals. Key Point: Before the widespread availability of commercial food, American families preferred cooked breakfasts. People saw a bowl of cereal as a nutritionally poor breakfast for people with financial difficulties. Modern Breakfast: S Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner’s Guide

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner’s Guide

I’m about to embark on my 3rd time starting a ketogenic diet. I see great results every time I get back to doing keto and I thought I would share this awesome article by my friends over at Authority Nutrition. This article was originally published by Authority Nutrition and is being republished on my website with permission. I couldn’t write a better article so I’m happy they allowed me to republish it for you all. I hope that you consider this way of eating, which is very much Paleo (with the optional addition of dairy), if you need to kickstart your weight loss, like I do (again)! If you would like to use a free Ketogenic meal plan, then check out these free meal plans by I Breathe I’m Hungry or snag the Ketogenic Cookbook. The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat dietthat offers many health benefits. Over 20 studies show that this type of diet can help you lose weight and improve health (1). Ketogenic diets may even have benefits against diabetes, cancer, epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease (2, 3, 4, 5). This article is a detailed beginner’s guide to the ketogenic diet. It contains everything you need to know. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet (often termed keto) is a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares many similarities with the Atkins and low-carb diets. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. The reduction in carbs puts your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When this happens, your body becomes incredibly efficient at burning fat for energy. It also turns fat into ketones in the liver, which can supply energy for the brain (6, 7). Ketogenic diets can cause massive reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels. This, along with the increased ketones, has numerous health benefits (6, 8, 9, Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To Low Carb Sweeteners

The Ultimate Guide To Low Carb Sweeteners

This is my ultimate guide to low carb sweeteners. Which ones I use, and which ones I don’t. I’ll explain how to use each one and what to look for when you buy them because not all low carb sweeteners are created equally. It can be incredibly confusing when you are just starting to live sugar free. Part of the ethos of living sugar free and low carb is to give up the sweet treats on a regular basis and to reset our taste buds. But being able to make a sweet treat occasionally is a deal breaker for many of you contemplating even starting. If you do want a cake, a dessert or a sweet treat, it is better to have a few good sugar free recipes on hand than to reach for a high carb snack. With so many sweeteners now on the market, which do you choose? Always read each and every label carefully, because even sweeteners within the same brand can contain different ingredients or different bulking agents such as dextrose. It may take some time to readjust your taste buds to living sugar free, and is it any wonder? Sugar is now found in 80% of products on our supermarket shelves. What is astounding is the type of foods that have added sugar. You might expect it to be in desserts and cereals but tuna? Soup? Bacon? There are also several different types of names for sugar which just makes it even more confusing when you’re trying to understand reading food labels. When I write my recipes I will always state the amount of low carb sweeteners I have used to make the recipe but I also add “sweetener of choice, to taste”. This is the biggest variable when it comes to low carb baking. We are all on different parts of our sugar free journey, so what might taste sweet to me, might not be nearly sweet enough for you. Always add low carb sweeteners in the minimum amount that suits yo Continue reading >>

What’s The Best Artificial Sweetener?

What’s The Best Artificial Sweetener?

One of the most popular questions asked by people who are just beginning the Ketogenic Diet and Lifestyle is about what they can use as a sweetener. Is aspartame okay? Or saccharine? What about Splenda? How about coconut sugar, it’s from a coconut, so it’s good, right? Honey is all natural, right? Make no mistake about it, there is a lot of confusing information out there about what sweeteners you can use. So I thought I’d take a few minutes to explain some things. First off, a little background information is needed. When assessing a sweeteners benefit to keto, the first thing that must be considered is what is known as the Glycemic Index (GI). The GI is a measure of how quickly certain foods will cause a spike in blood sugar. Spiking blood sugar will result in insulin spikes. Insulin spikes is the mechanism for type 2 diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and a host of other illnesses. So the idea behind keto is to keep the blood sugar low, and certainly to prevent any kind of spiking. The higher the number of the GI for any given food, the more insulin will be produced. Any food with a GI of 70 or higher is considered high. Below 55 is considered low. Everything else (56-69) is in the middle. Okay…now for a brief detour to talk about terms. The question is what “artificial” sweetener is best, but I’m also including some other sweeteners, known as natural sweeteners. And I show the lists separately. Any food with a value of 100 is, essentially, considered “pure sugar.” I included what I consider to be the most common sweeteners, and certainly the most common asked about sweeteners. Name Type of sweetener GI Maltodextrin Sugar 110 Maltose Sugar 105 Dextrose Sugar 100 Glucose Sugar 100 HFCS-42 (High-fructose corn syrup) Modified Sugar 68 Sucrose Sugar Continue reading >>

Best Sugar Substitute For Keto? [infographic]

Best Sugar Substitute For Keto? [infographic]

We’re going to be breaking these sweeteners down into 3 distinct categories in order to choose the best sugar substitute for a keto diet. Those categories are Artificial Sweeteners, Sugar Alcohols, and Natural Sweeteners. Check out our video where we touch on everything covered in this blog post and give our recommendations for the best sugar substitute for keto. Artificial Sweeteners These tend to known as intense sweeteners because they are much sweeter than regular sugar. Based on this fact, you only need a fraction of the amount you would normally use with regular sugar. This is seen as a benefit by many. They contain synthetic chemicals that stimulate the sweet taste receptors on your tongue. So, let us break down the different types of artificial sweeteners: Aspartame You might not recognize the name, but if you’ve ever used Equal, you’ve been using aspartame. Aspartame is a low calorie sweetener that is approximately 180 times sweeter than regular sugar. The components that make up this artificial sweetener are amino acid, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, which are not only broken down completely by your body, but found in larger quantities in a great deal of foods, such as meat and vegetables. Aspartame is 0 calories and 0 gylcemic index. When combined with dextrose and maltodextrin to form Equal brand sweetener the calories and glycemic index are increased based on the added ingredients. Pros: Essentially Zero calorie additive Zero glycemic index Cons: Often mixed with high glycemic bulking agents Highly controversial/opposing studies on safety Acesulfame K This artificial sweetener is used in a variety of foods and is approximately 200 times sweeter than regular sugar. It is often found in a blend with other sweeteners, such as aspartame. Blending the tw Continue reading >>

3-ingredient Low Carb Peanut Butter Cookies (keto Friendly Recipe)

3-ingredient Low Carb Peanut Butter Cookies (keto Friendly Recipe)

Looking for a low carb cookie that tastes yummy too? You’ve gotta try these DELICIOUS Peanut Butter Cookies using just three simple ingredients. They puff up a little bit, have great flavor, and kind of melt in your mouth. In fact, you’d never guess they’re low carb at all! A few years ago we shared a very easy 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Peanut Butter Cookie recipe that fellow Hip2Save readers really enjoyed. The recipe I’m sharing today is basically a low carb variation to that popular idea! If you’re following a Low Carb or Keto lifestyle make sure to pick a natural peanut butter that has no sugar or low sugar. You’ll also need a sugar substitute such as erythritol. Serves: 15 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes Directions Step 1: Combine all three ingredients in a mixing bowl. Step 2: Roll out 15 one-inch sized cookies onto a parchment paper covered baking sheet or silicone mat. Step 3: Use a fork to press down on the tops of cookies. Step 4: Bake at 350 degrees for about 10-13 minutes. Step 5: Let cool and serve. Store leftovers in a covered container. Additional Notes These cookies are so GOOD! They are an easy to make and satisfying treat if you need something sweet! Click HERE to find nutritional info. Depending on what peanut butter you choose this could come in at about 105 calories and 2 g net carbs per cookie. Written by Lina for Hip2Save. Lina is a proud mom of 2 kids who loves photography, all holidays, cooking, thrift store makeovers, bargain shopping, and DIY makeovers. Her goal is to create a beautiful life and stylish home on a dime! To see all of Lina’s DIY/Crafts created just for Hip2Save, click here. Have you seen these? Continue reading >>

Is Peanut Butter Ketogenic-friendly?

Is Peanut Butter Ketogenic-friendly?

Did you know that it takes about 540 peanuts to make a 12-ounce jar of peanut butter? That’s a lot of peanuts concentrated into one jar. So if you’re eating a lot of peanut butter, it’s best to know just how healthy it is for you. For many, peanut butter is a cheap and convenient protein source that is low in carbs and high in fat. Therefore, peanut butter sounds like a pretty good food to eat on the ketogenic diet. However, apart from its ability to keep you in nutritional ketosis by being low in carbs, is peanut butter ketogenic-friendly and should you be including it in your diet? (Of course, if you’re allergic to peanuts, stay away from them!) Quick History Of Peanut Butter Peanuts originally came from South America and has the scientific name, Arachis hypogaea, which roughly translates to weed that has fruit growing underground. Very appetizing name… While there’s debate about who originally came up with the idea of peanut butter, there are suggestions that South American Indians ground peanuts into a paste and mixed it with cocoa almost 3000 years ago. Our modern day peanut butter, however, has its origins in much more modern times (just over 100 years ago). The exact person who first invented peanut butter in its modern form is sadly lost to history. George Washington Carver is often credited with inventing peanut butter, but he supposedly didn’t actually invent it. Nor did John Harvey Kellogg (yes, he’s also one of the brothers that invented the popular breakfast cereal), who helped popularize peanut butter as a healthy vegetarian food. However, Kellogg did filed the first patent for creating peanut butter in 1895. And just in case you’re wondering about the history of PB&J sandwiches, the first reference to them was made in 1901 in the Boston Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Food List

Ketogenic Diet Food List

The most difficult part of starting any new diet is learning what foods are and aren’t acceptable. That is why I have formulated this ketogenic diet food list to help you along the way. Stick this on your refrigerator or print out a copy to take with you to the grocery store! * items marked with an asterisk have a carb content and need to be moderated Fat When buying meats, you want to try and get those with a good fat content. If you are using lean meat, add fat to it like butter or coconut oil if you are trying to reach your fat macro. Tallow Butter Meats/Proteins When buying meats, you want to try and get those with a good fat content. If you are using lean meat, add fat to it like butter or coconut oil if you are trying to reach your fat macro. Bacon Steak Ground beef Eggs Ribs (Pork/Beef/Lamb) Roasts (Pork/Beef/Lamb) Pork Loin, Chops & Steaks Chicken (skin-on breasts, thighs, wings, drumsticks) Ham Sausages Deli meats (double check nutrition for certain brands that use carb fillers) Cured Meats (pepperoni, salami, prosciutto) Seafood (canned or fresh) Shrimp Lobster Tilapia Cod Scallops Crab Tuna Albacore Salmon Sardines Oysters Dairy The key to finding keto-friendly dairy is to look at the carb and sugar content. Regular cows milk is generally out as it’s fairly carb heavy, but heavy creams are a great and tasty substitute. Experiment with new cheese findings! Full-fat cheeses Heavy whipping cream Full-fat sour cream Butter (avoid margarines) Full-fat cream cheese Vegetables You will want your carb sources to basically be vegetables/limited fruits. The purpose of this diet is to eat high fat, moderate protein, and low carbohydrate. Asparagus Squash (spaghetti, butternut, etc.) Peppers (jalapeno, bell, banana, etc.) * Mushrooms Cucumbers Cabbage Brussel sprouts Continue reading >>

Complete Guide To Sweeteners On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Complete Guide To Sweeteners On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Most people on low-carb find that once they get used to the diet, the cravings for sugar go away. Many even claim not to use any sweeteners at all. However, you may find it hard to give up sweets, especially at the beginning. I've been researching for natural low-carb sweeteners as well as other healthy alternatives to sugar. As always, there are many sweeteners you should avoid. I personally avoid using sweeteners regularly and only use them for occasional treats. In fact, most of my recipes in KetoDiet, KetoDiet Basic and my new cookbook don't include any sweeteners at all. If your target is weight loss, sweeteners may impair your progress, as even so-called "zero-carb" sweeteners may cause cravings. If your weight is stalling, avoiding sweeteners or joining my 30-Day Clean Eating Challenge is a good way to break the weight loss plateau. You can download a print-friendly version of this guide here! Best Natural Low-carb Sweeteners Following is an overview of healthy sweeteners you could use provided your net carbs limit allows for it. People with very low net carbs limit should avoid using anything other than "zero-carb" sweeteners, like Stevia, Monk fruit sweetener or Erythritol. 1. Stevia Stevia is an herb, which is commonly known as "sugar leaf". The extract from this herb is used as a sweetener and sugar substitute. Based on the USDA database, Stevia belongs to a group of non-nutritive sweeteners. This means there are no calories, vitamins or any other nutrients. The availability of Stevia can vary from country to country. Nowadays, it is commonly used in the US and was approved for use in the EU in 2011. The health effects of Stevia have been questioned for the past few decades. However, based on recent studies of the WHO (World Health Organization), Stevia extra Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Raw Honey.

Ketosis And Raw Honey.

I do not eat raw honey every day but sometimes I will have two cups of coffee in the morning (only once or twice a week, normally I only have water or plain green tea) and I will sweeten it with raw honey (one teaspoon each cup) together with heavy cream. Will the honey ruin my ketosis, will that little damage my weightloss results? 1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb you will never lose belly fat. healthplus50.com 2 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com Note: I also have not been eating anything but meat lately and will reintroduce vegetables closer to my goal weight. Continue reading >>

Is Honey A Sweet Low-carb Indulgence Or Keto No-no?

Is Honey A Sweet Low-carb Indulgence Or Keto No-no?

Honey has been touted as a superfood in the world of health and nutrition, and it is undoubtedly a far healthier choice than refined sugar. There are conflicting opinions as to whether or not honey really can be part of a healthy diet, or if it is no better than other types of sugar. In this article, we’ll compare the health benefits of honey to more processed sugars, and also consider whether it has a place in your low carb diet. What is Honey, Exactly? Honey has been used throughout history across the globe for both its medicinal and nutritional benefits. Some health experts point out that honey is very high in fructose, and therefore unhealthy. While this is true (and why honey should be used in moderation, whether you follow a low carb diet or not), honey also comes with a long list of nutrients, a bit of fiber and other health promoting compounds. Specifically, honey contains the following: 82% sugar, 40% of which is fructose. Small amounts of vitamins and minerals. Some antioxidants. Depending on the type of honey, its fructose: glucose content can vary greatly, meaning certain types will have a higher glycemic index than others. 1 tbsp. contains 64 calories. What Are The Health Benefits of Honey? Before looking specifically as to whether honey has a place in a low carb diet model, let’s consider the health benefits offered, and how they compare to those of white sugar (hint: honey comes out far ahead). High in Antioxidants High quality honey (especially raw honey) offers a decent amount of antioxidants, which are important for fighting oxidative damage caused by free radicals. Excessive free radicals in the body have been linked to serious chronic diseases and cancer. Studies show that honey is particularly high in certain phenols, flavonoids and enzymes whic Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

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