diabetestalk.net

Is Dka Serious?

Share on facebook

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) Among Children And Young People With Type 1 Diabetes

This fact sheet provides the most recent available data on hospitalisations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a serious complication of diabetes. It highlights that DKA continues to affect many children and young people with type 1 diabetes, in particular females and those living in regional and remote areas and in lower socioeconomic areas. People aged less than 25 years accounted for 54% of all DKA hospitalisations of those with type 1 diabetes DKA hospitalisation rates 1.5 times as high for Outer regional and Remote and very remote areas than for Major cities DKA hospitalisation rates were 1.4 times as high in females as males. 16% of DKA hospitalisation of young people had also a diagnosis of psychological or behavioural conditions Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. dietcherry

    THE DANGERS OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    This serious complication, the result of acid buildup in the blood, can lead to coma or even death.
    If you have type 1 diabetes, one of the serious complications you may face is a condition known as ketoacidosis. In diabetic ketoacidosis, acids called ketones build up in your blood and could eventually lead to diabetic coma or death.
    But by vigilantly controlling your diabetes and watching for early signs of ketoacidosis, you can help prevent it from happening to you.
    What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?
    "When blood sugars get elevated and there is not enough insulin, your fat cells start to break down their storage sites of energy, which are called ketones," says Jay Cohen, MD, medical director of the Endocrine Clinic and clinical assistant professor in the department of family medicine at the University of Tennessee. Ketones are acidic, and that acid builds up in your blood.
    Diabetic ketoacidosis is found more often in younger people than older people, and more often in women than in men. At least 20 percent of people learn they have diabetes after seeking medical care for complaints that turn out to be symptoms of ketoacidosis.
    Common Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    The three common causes of ketoacidosis are:
    Not enough insulin. This can happen if you don’t inject enough insulin or if your insulin needs increase in response to an illness such as a cold or the flu. Blood glucose can’t be used for energy without enough insulin to help in the process, so the body breaks down fat for energy and high ketone levels result.
    "Elevated blood sugars could be due to an infection or any other physical or emotional stress — good or bad," says Dr. Cohen. Unexpected increases in your blood glucose levels can increase your insulin needs. "You may have a certain amount of insulin that you usually use, but if you have an infection, you may need more insulin to help your body to improve blood sugars," Cohen explains.
    Not enough food intake. If you don’t eat enough, your body has to break down fat for energy, producing high ketone levels. This is particularly common in people who are sick and don't feel like eating.
    Low blood glucose levels. This situation can force your body to break down fat to use as energy, resulting in ketone production.
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms
    Symptoms of ketoacidosis usually progress relatively slowly. But since diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition, it is important to seek medical help immediately if you experience any of its symptoms. These include:
    Excessive thirst
    Dry mouth
    Frequent urination
    Elevated blood glucose levels
    Elevated ketones in the urine
    Persistent fatigue
    Skin that is dry or flushed
    Nausea or vomiting
    Pain in your abdomen
    Shortness of breath
    A fruity smell to your breath (the result of elevated ketone levels)
    Inability to concentrate
    Confused state
    Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Ask your endocrinologist how you can reduce your risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. It is often a good idea to use a home dipstick test to check for ketones in your urine when your blood glucose levels are high (over 240 milligrams per deciliter) and when you have an infection.
    Diabetes education also helps. One study found that hospital stays for ketoacidosis were reduced among a group of people who attended diabetes education classes.
    Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    If think you may have ketoacidosis, it is essential to contact your doctor or get to the emergency room immediately.
    "If we can catch it early, with medicine and IV fluids, we can stop the diabetic ketoacidosis from progressing to severe dehydration," says Cohen. "Diabetic ketoacidosis, if severe and not treated aggressively, has about a 5 percent death rate, so you really want to get a handle on it rapidly."
    Remember that regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels, performing urine ketone tests as recommended, and recognizing symptoms that might indicate your ketone levels are high is the best approach to reducing your risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.
    From Everyday Health

  2. Gem93

    I recently had a friend that got DKA she only had ketones for a day and was bring violently sick she couldn't test for ketones as her strips were left at her uni campus and went home to visit her family for the weekend her mum was just about to leave to go get the strips when she said I don't feel well take me to hospital betime she got to hospital ( which is a 10 min drive from where she lives) her vains had short down and the only vain left was the one to her heart they had to cut her throat open to put in an insulin drip immediately and was put in intensive care her family was told she might not make it and that was from having ketone symptoms for just a few hours / day at the most .. This has woken me up to life alot Snd made me realise what can happen if you don't look after yourself

  3. dietcherry

    OMG Can you get her to join here so we may talk to her?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can happen in people with diabetes. DKA should be treated as a medical emergency. This is because it can lead to coma or death. If you have the symptoms of DKA, get medical help right away. DKA happens more often in people with type 1 diabetes. But it can happen in people with type 2 diabetes. It can also happen in women with diabetes during pregnancy. This is often known as gestational diabetes. DKA happens when insulin levels are too low. Without enough insulin, sugar (glucose) can’t get to the cells of your body. The glucose stays in the blood. This causes high blood glucose (hyperglycemia). Without glucose, your body breaks down stored fat for energy. When this happens, acids called ketones are released into the blood. This is known as ketosis. High levels of ketones (ketoacidosis) can be harmful to you. Hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis can also cause serious problems in the blood and your body, such as: Low levels of potassium (hypokalemia) Swelling inside the brain (cerebral edema) Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) Damage to kidneys or other organs What causes diabetic ketoacidosis? In people with diabetes, DKA is most Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. dietcherry

    THE DANGERS OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    This serious complication, the result of acid buildup in the blood, can lead to coma or even death.
    If you have type 1 diabetes, one of the serious complications you may face is a condition known as ketoacidosis. In diabetic ketoacidosis, acids called ketones build up in your blood and could eventually lead to diabetic coma or death.
    But by vigilantly controlling your diabetes and watching for early signs of ketoacidosis, you can help prevent it from happening to you.
    What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?
    "When blood sugars get elevated and there is not enough insulin, your fat cells start to break down their storage sites of energy, which are called ketones," says Jay Cohen, MD, medical director of the Endocrine Clinic and clinical assistant professor in the department of family medicine at the University of Tennessee. Ketones are acidic, and that acid builds up in your blood.
    Diabetic ketoacidosis is found more often in younger people than older people, and more often in women than in men. At least 20 percent of people learn they have diabetes after seeking medical care for complaints that turn out to be symptoms of ketoacidosis.
    Common Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    The three common causes of ketoacidosis are:
    Not enough insulin. This can happen if you don’t inject enough insulin or if your insulin needs increase in response to an illness such as a cold or the flu. Blood glucose can’t be used for energy without enough insulin to help in the process, so the body breaks down fat for energy and high ketone levels result.
    "Elevated blood sugars could be due to an infection or any other physical or emotional stress — good or bad," says Dr. Cohen. Unexpected increases in your blood glucose levels can increase your insulin needs. "You may have a certain amount of insulin that you usually use, but if you have an infection, you may need more insulin to help your body to improve blood sugars," Cohen explains.
    Not enough food intake. If you don’t eat enough, your body has to break down fat for energy, producing high ketone levels. This is particularly common in people who are sick and don't feel like eating.
    Low blood glucose levels. This situation can force your body to break down fat to use as energy, resulting in ketone production.
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms
    Symptoms of ketoacidosis usually progress relatively slowly. But since diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition, it is important to seek medical help immediately if you experience any of its symptoms. These include:
    Excessive thirst
    Dry mouth
    Frequent urination
    Elevated blood glucose levels
    Elevated ketones in the urine
    Persistent fatigue
    Skin that is dry or flushed
    Nausea or vomiting
    Pain in your abdomen
    Shortness of breath
    A fruity smell to your breath (the result of elevated ketone levels)
    Inability to concentrate
    Confused state
    Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Ask your endocrinologist how you can reduce your risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. It is often a good idea to use a home dipstick test to check for ketones in your urine when your blood glucose levels are high (over 240 milligrams per deciliter) and when you have an infection.
    Diabetes education also helps. One study found that hospital stays for ketoacidosis were reduced among a group of people who attended diabetes education classes.
    Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    If think you may have ketoacidosis, it is essential to contact your doctor or get to the emergency room immediately.
    "If we can catch it early, with medicine and IV fluids, we can stop the diabetic ketoacidosis from progressing to severe dehydration," says Cohen. "Diabetic ketoacidosis, if severe and not treated aggressively, has about a 5 percent death rate, so you really want to get a handle on it rapidly."
    Remember that regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels, performing urine ketone tests as recommended, and recognizing symptoms that might indicate your ketone levels are high is the best approach to reducing your risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.
    From Everyday Health

  2. Gem93

    I recently had a friend that got DKA she only had ketones for a day and was bring violently sick she couldn't test for ketones as her strips were left at her uni campus and went home to visit her family for the weekend her mum was just about to leave to go get the strips when she said I don't feel well take me to hospital betime she got to hospital ( which is a 10 min drive from where she lives) her vains had short down and the only vain left was the one to her heart they had to cut her throat open to put in an insulin drip immediately and was put in intensive care her family was told she might not make it and that was from having ketone symptoms for just a few hours / day at the most .. This has woken me up to life alot Snd made me realise what can happen if you don't look after yourself

  3. dietcherry

    OMG Can you get her to join here so we may talk to her?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Related Events In The Canagliflozin Type 2 Diabetes Clinical Program

Go to: Research Design and Methods An analysis of all serious adverse events of DKA and related terms of ketoacidosis, metabolic acidosis, and acidosis was performed using a database that contained data from 17,596 patients, with nearly 24,000 patient-years of exposure, compiled from completed and ongoing randomized, controlled clinical studies of canagliflozin. The overall mean exposure in this analysis was 1.4 years. Table 1 includes details regarding the studies included in this analysis, which was conducted by Janssen Research & Development, LLC (the sponsor of canagliflozin). A history of type 1 diabetes or DKA was an exclusion criterion in all studies. Ascertainment of potential events for inclusion in this analysis was done using investigator-reported adverse events. Four adverse event terms (i.e., diabetic ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis, metabolic acidosis, and acidosis) from the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) were searched. Cases meeting standard criteria for a regulatory definition of a serious adverse event (e.g., resulting in hospitalization or a medically important event) were included in this analysis. All unblinded cases in this analysis came from Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. dietcherry

    THE DANGERS OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    This serious complication, the result of acid buildup in the blood, can lead to coma or even death.
    If you have type 1 diabetes, one of the serious complications you may face is a condition known as ketoacidosis. In diabetic ketoacidosis, acids called ketones build up in your blood and could eventually lead to diabetic coma or death.
    But by vigilantly controlling your diabetes and watching for early signs of ketoacidosis, you can help prevent it from happening to you.
    What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?
    "When blood sugars get elevated and there is not enough insulin, your fat cells start to break down their storage sites of energy, which are called ketones," says Jay Cohen, MD, medical director of the Endocrine Clinic and clinical assistant professor in the department of family medicine at the University of Tennessee. Ketones are acidic, and that acid builds up in your blood.
    Diabetic ketoacidosis is found more often in younger people than older people, and more often in women than in men. At least 20 percent of people learn they have diabetes after seeking medical care for complaints that turn out to be symptoms of ketoacidosis.
    Common Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    The three common causes of ketoacidosis are:
    Not enough insulin. This can happen if you don’t inject enough insulin or if your insulin needs increase in response to an illness such as a cold or the flu. Blood glucose can’t be used for energy without enough insulin to help in the process, so the body breaks down fat for energy and high ketone levels result.
    "Elevated blood sugars could be due to an infection or any other physical or emotional stress — good or bad," says Dr. Cohen. Unexpected increases in your blood glucose levels can increase your insulin needs. "You may have a certain amount of insulin that you usually use, but if you have an infection, you may need more insulin to help your body to improve blood sugars," Cohen explains.
    Not enough food intake. If you don’t eat enough, your body has to break down fat for energy, producing high ketone levels. This is particularly common in people who are sick and don't feel like eating.
    Low blood glucose levels. This situation can force your body to break down fat to use as energy, resulting in ketone production.
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms
    Symptoms of ketoacidosis usually progress relatively slowly. But since diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition, it is important to seek medical help immediately if you experience any of its symptoms. These include:
    Excessive thirst
    Dry mouth
    Frequent urination
    Elevated blood glucose levels
    Elevated ketones in the urine
    Persistent fatigue
    Skin that is dry or flushed
    Nausea or vomiting
    Pain in your abdomen
    Shortness of breath
    A fruity smell to your breath (the result of elevated ketone levels)
    Inability to concentrate
    Confused state
    Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Ask your endocrinologist how you can reduce your risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. It is often a good idea to use a home dipstick test to check for ketones in your urine when your blood glucose levels are high (over 240 milligrams per deciliter) and when you have an infection.
    Diabetes education also helps. One study found that hospital stays for ketoacidosis were reduced among a group of people who attended diabetes education classes.
    Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    If think you may have ketoacidosis, it is essential to contact your doctor or get to the emergency room immediately.
    "If we can catch it early, with medicine and IV fluids, we can stop the diabetic ketoacidosis from progressing to severe dehydration," says Cohen. "Diabetic ketoacidosis, if severe and not treated aggressively, has about a 5 percent death rate, so you really want to get a handle on it rapidly."
    Remember that regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels, performing urine ketone tests as recommended, and recognizing symptoms that might indicate your ketone levels are high is the best approach to reducing your risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.
    From Everyday Health

  2. Gem93

    I recently had a friend that got DKA she only had ketones for a day and was bring violently sick she couldn't test for ketones as her strips were left at her uni campus and went home to visit her family for the weekend her mum was just about to leave to go get the strips when she said I don't feel well take me to hospital betime she got to hospital ( which is a 10 min drive from where she lives) her vains had short down and the only vain left was the one to her heart they had to cut her throat open to put in an insulin drip immediately and was put in intensive care her family was told she might not make it and that was from having ketone symptoms for just a few hours / day at the most .. This has woken me up to life alot Snd made me realise what can happen if you don't look after yourself

  3. dietcherry

    OMG Can you get her to join here so we may talk to her?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Is Dka Serious?

    A balanced body chemistry is crucial for a healthy human body. A sudden drop in pH can cause significant damage to organ systems and even death. This lesson takes a closer look at a condition in which the pH of the body is severely compromised called diabetic ketoacidosis. Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis, sometimes abbreviated as DKA, is a condition in which a high amount of acid in the body is caused by a high concentration of ketone bodies. Th ...

    ketosis Jan 4, 2018
  • Why Diabetes Is Serious?

    Luckily, there are warning signs that, if heeded, help you avoid getting this disease. If your doctor diagnoses you with pre-diabetes, it is vital you understand the implications of this diagnosis. More than one-third of Americans have pre-diabetes. This is a serious health condition that indicates chronically elevated blood sugar levels. Without making appropriate changes –to diet, incorporating more physical activity, and losing weight – yo ...

    diabetes Dec 30, 2017
  • Is Type 1 Diabetes More Serious Than Type 2

    In general, people with diabetes either have a total lack of insulin (type 1 diabetes) or they have too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively (type 2 diabetes). Type 1 diabetes (formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes), accounts for 5 to 10 out of 100 people who have diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, eventually eliminating insulin production from the bod ...

    diabetes Apr 17, 2018
  • How Serious Is Type 1 Diabetes

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (also known as type 1 diabetes) is a form of diabetes mellitus in which not enough insulin is produced.[4] This results in high blood sugar levels in the body.[1] The classical symptoms are frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger, and weight loss.[4] Additional symptoms may include blurry vision, feeling tired, and poor healing.[2] Symptoms typically develop over a short period of time.[1] The cause of type ...

    diabetes Apr 17, 2018
  • Why Is Diabetes Such A Serious Disease

    1. Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes. 1. An estimated one out of every four people with diabetes has the disease and does not know it. 1. An estimated 79 million adults have pre-diabetes, placing them at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. 1. Diabetes is a serious disease, particularly when it is left undiagnosed or untreated. 1. If left undiagnosed or untreated, diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as heart diseas ...

    diabetes Jan 3, 2018
  • How Serious Is Diabetes Type 1

    The more severe form of diabetes is type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes. It’s sometimes called “juvenile” diabetes, because type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and teenagers, though it can develop at any age. Immune System Attacks With type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks part of its own pancreas. Scientists are not sure why. But the immune system mistakenly sees the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas as forei ...

    diabetes Jan 4, 2018

More in ketosis