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Is Dka In Emergency?

Ebm Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Ebm Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Epidemiology New diagnosis of diabetes 10-27%. Infection ~ 35%, inadequate insulin ~ 30%, surgery, trauma, alcohol, cocaine and drugs such as steroids, thiazides, sympathomimetics, pentamidine. No cause in 19-38%, but poor compliance / economic reasons frequent. Mortality 1% in adults, but 5% if over 65 years. Also high 15% in patients with hyperglycaemic, hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome (HHNS), when BSL usually > 50 mmol/L, more dehydrated with osmolality is > 320 mosm/L – can calculate latter by (2[NA + K] + glucose). Diagnostic Criteria Raised glucose >11.1 mmol/L Acidosis with arterial / venous pH < 7.3, or venous bicarb < 15 mmol/L Ketonaemia or ketonuria (urinalysis may miss 3-beta hydroxybutyrate early). Management / Complications Hypoperfusion Rapid initial crystalloid, especially for significant circulatory insufficiency, at 15-20 mL/kg in first hour ie. 1-1.5 L. Possible role for bicarbonate is in patients with impending cardiovascular collapse, if pH < 6.9. Dilute 100 mmol 8.4% bicarbonate in 250-1000 mL 0.45% NS, and give over 30-60 minutes with 20 mmol K via infusion pump. (Note there are no prospective data concerning bicarbonate use below pH 6.9, and from 6.9-7.1 morbidity and mortality outcomes are equivocal ie. not proven). Fluid replacement Total body water deficit 100 mL/kg, and sodium deficit 7-10 mmol/kg. Restore normal hydration with 0.9% NS at 4-14 mL/kg/hr, to correct estimated fluid deficit over first 24 hours, without exceeding change in osmolality greater than 3 mOsm/kg per hour. One regime is NS 1000 mL in first hour, 500 mL/hr next 4 hours, then 250 mL/hr next 4 hours ie. around 4 L in first 9 hours. Aim to restore fluid deficits over 24 hours in adults, or up to 48 hours in children. Insulin infusion Insulin infusion at 0.1 units/kg/hr Continue reading >>

Management Of Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Management Of Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare yet potentially fatal hyperglycemic crisis that can occur in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Due to its increasing incidence and economic impact related to the treatment and associated morbidity, effective management and prevention is key. Elements of management include making the appropriate diagnosis using current laboratory tools and clinical criteria and coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, and electrolyte replacement through feedback obtained from timely patient monitoring and knowledge of resolution criteria. In addition, awareness of special populations such as patients with renal disease presenting with DKA is important. During the DKA therapy, complications may arise and appropriate strategies to prevent these complications are required. DKA prevention strategies including patient and provider education are important. This review aims to provide a brief overview of DKA from its pathophysiology to clinical presentation with in depth focus on up-to-date therapeutic management. Keywords: DKA treatment, insulin, prevention, ESKD Go to: Introduction In 2009, there were 140,000 hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with an average length of stay of 3.4 days.1 The direct and indirect annual cost of DKA hospitalizations is 2.4 billion US dollars. Omission of insulin is the most common precipitant of DKA.2,3 Infections, acute medical illnesses involving the cardiovascular system (myocardial infarction, stroke) and gastrointestinal tract (bleeding, pancreatitis), diseases of the endocrine axis (acromegaly, Cushing’s syndrome), and stress of recent surgical procedures can contribute to the development of DKA by causing dehydration, increase in insulin counter-regulatory hor Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies – Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic Emergencies – Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute complication of diabetes mellitus. It is characterized by the triad of hyperglycemia, ketosis, and metabolic acidosis.1 DKA complicates mainly patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus, where it may be the first manifestation of the disease, and rarely people with Type 2 diabetes.1 A special heterogeneous syndrome of "ketosis – prone diabetes (KPD)," in usually adult patients who may lack the typical clinical phenotype of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes, has recently been identified. While initially the condition was thought to be limited to persons of non-Caucasian ethnicity (African-Americans and Hispanics), its prevalence appears to be increasing worldwide.2 DKA is an emergency situation and hospitalization of the patient is necessary for immediate treatment. Its frequency is reported as 4.8 – 8.0 episodes per 1000 diabetic patients.3,4 The mortality rate is 2.5 – 9% and increases along with age, level of consciousness on admission, degree of hyperosmolality and acidosis, as well as severity of azotemia.5,6 In the US, hospitalizations due to DKA reach 100,000 and the cost of treatment has been reported as 1 billion dollars per year.7… The criteria for the diagnosis of DKA are shown in Table 1.1.8,9 DKA can be mild, moderate, or severe. It is considered severe when the arterial blood pH is less than 7.0, the concentration of plasma bicarbonate is less than 10 mEq/L, and the anion gap is greater than 12 mEq/L. In severe DKA, the patient is in stupor or in coma. Notably, the severity of DKA does not necessarily coincide with the degree of hyperglycemia. DKA can rarely be seen without marked hyperglycemia (euglycemic DKA), and in one series of 722 consecutive episodes of DKA only 1.1% had blood glucose levels less than 180 mg/dl (1 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario

DOI: 10.7759/cureus.1286 Cite this article as: Addison R, Skinner T, Zhou F, et al. (May 29, 2017) Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario. Cureus 9(5): e1286. doi:10.7759/cureus.1286 Abstract Simulation provides a safe environment where learning is enhanced through the deliberate practice of skills and controlled management of a variety of clinical encounters. This is particularly important for core cases and low-frequency, high-stakes procedures and encounters. Competency-based medical education has seen widespread adoption in the field along with ongoing work in the areas of undergraduate and postgraduate training. Similarly, effective professional development activities stand to benefit greatly from a more stringent integration of simulation and competency-based approaches. This particularly makes sense when considering the goals of patient safety and achievement of optimal clinical outcomes. The current report describes a simulation training session designed to acquaint emergency medicine residents with the presentation and management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) through the use of simulation. Continue reading >>

Anaesthetic Management During Surgery In A Patient Of Gastrointestinal Perforation With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Anaesthetic Management During Surgery In A Patient Of Gastrointestinal Perforation With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sudhir Kumar Bisherwal*, Hiranmay Barman, Arundhati Dalai and Ravi Shankar Prasad Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, India *Corresponding Author: Sudhir Kumar Bisherwal Institute of Medical Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi Uttar Pradesh 221005, India Tel: +917379167800 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Bisherwal SK, Barman H, Dalai A, Prasad RS (2016) Anaesthetic Management during Surgery in a Patient of Gastrointestinal Perforation with Diabetic Ketoacidosis. J Anesth Clin Res 7:680. doi:10.4172/2155-6148.1000680 Copyright: © 2016 Bisherwal SK, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Anesthesia & Clinical Research Abstract Patients with diabetes are often encountered for anaesthesia and surgery. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a common condition which is caused by production of ketones because of deficient insulin. Its prevalence can be as high as 30% in diabetic patients. Elective surgery is to be postponed in patients of DKA. Mortality is increased in patients of ketoacidosis undergoing surgery and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes is associated with increased hospital stay and increased incidence of wound infection. In this case, we present anaesthetic methods used for a patient in DKA undergoing exploratory laparotomy for peritonitis secondary to bowel perforation. Keywords Diabetes mellitus; Diabetic ketoacidosis; Emergency laparotomy; Perforation peritonitis Introduction Diabetes is fast gaining the status of an epidemic in world. By the year 2030, the world prevalence of diab Continue reading >>

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Selected References These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Articles from Emergency Medicine Journal : EMJ are provided here courtesy of BMJ Publishing Group Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Dka (diabetic Ketoacidosis): Real Life In The Emergency Room

Dka (diabetic Ketoacidosis): Real Life In The Emergency Room

This is the first in a series from Susan Dupont RN BSN who is an Emergency Room Nurse and contributor at NRSNG.com . . . Click to View All Articles in the “Real Life in the ER Series” Every patient is a mystery that needs to be solved. Some are easy, some are complex, some aren’t solvable, but the thrill of a good challenge is what keeps me coming back for more. The emergency room is full of unsolved mystery’s. Every once in a while a mystery worth writing about comes along. Altered Mental Status? It was like any normal shift. I had just discharged a patient and walked them out of the ER to turn around and see an EMS stretcher waiting to enter my room. I hadn’t even cleaned the room yet. I grabbed a piece of paper and pen and walked into my favorite type of patient, Altered Mental Status. This patient, a 20-year-old female, had been found wandering around the streets and stumbling around. She didn’t know her name and when she attempted to talk, random words were coming out of her mouth. She would only respond to a sternal rub and her breath was fruity. Vital signs: BP 80/48 mmHg Respirations of 32 Heart rate 125 bpm (sinus tachycardia on her EKG). After getting a reading of >500 blood glucose on the glucometer, we started the search for an IV. This was the challenge of the night. This little girl had absolutely tiny veins that were hidden. Her first IV gave us blood but after starting a bolus of normal saline the line infiltrated, causing a grape sized lump on her forearm. The next IV was in her hand and it worked but was only a 22 gauge. We needed better IV access. After using the infrared goggles and ultrasound we got 2 IV’s, one in each antecubital. Suspicious of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, her lab work confirmed the diagnosis. Her blood work showed: Glucose Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Emergency Department Utilizing A Web Based Insulin Infusion Algorithm

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Emergency Department Utilizing A Web Based Insulin Infusion Algorithm

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Annual Scientific & Clinical Congress Authors Joseph Aloi,1 Raymie McFarland,2 Margaret Bachand,3 Courtenay Harrison3 Ongoing efforts at improving quality metrics in the care of persons with diabetes frequently focus on avoiding unnecessary hospitalizations, decreasing length of stay and avoiding readmission to hospital following discharge. Our prior experience with Glucommander, a web based insulin dosing algorithm, in inpatient insulin protocols suggested that its use in the emergency department (ED) would be safe. We previously studied the effectiveness of the Glucommander system for the treatment of mild to moderate Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) in the ED and reported early data on 15 patients. We now report a full 1 year experience with 35 patients studied. DKA is a frequent cause for hospital admissions – accounting for up to 8% of general medicine admissions in some hospital studies.4 Current standard treatment protocols involves use of intravenous insulin infusions monitored in the intensive care unit (ICU); raising both the cost and complexity of care. Methods 35 Patients seen in the ED diagnosed with DKA during the 2012 calendar year were reviewed. All patients were studied at a single site – Virginia Beach General Hospital (VGBH) a 300 bed community hospital within the Sentara healthcare system. Patients seen in the ED with either significant hyperglycemia (glucose >300 mg/dL) or DKA were placed on the Glucomander protocol. Patients were then monitored for readiness to be discharged or need for admission. Adult patients with blood glucose >250 mg/dL, a positive anion gap and/or ketonuria were eligible to participate. Patients with severe acidosis (pH <7.0 or serum bicarbonate <10 nmol/L), or a concomi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Must Read Articles Related To Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis (cont.) Fluid replacement and insulin administration intravenously (IV) are the primary and most critical initial treatments for diabetic ketoacidosis. These therapies together reverse dehydration, lower blood acid levels, and restore normal sugar and electrolyte balance. Fluids must be administered wisely - not at an excessive rate or total volume due to the risk of brain swelling (cerebral edema). Potassium is typically added to IV fluids to correct total body depletion of this important electrolyte. Insulin must not be delayed and must be given promptly as a continuous infusion (not as a bolus - a large dose given rapidly) to stop further ketone formation and to stabilize tissue function by driving available potassium back inside the body's cells. Once blood glucose levels have fallen below 300mg/dL, glucose may be co-administered with ongoing insulin administration to avoid the development of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). People diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis are usually admitted into the hospital for treatment and may be admitted to the intensive care unit. Some people with mild acidosis with modest fluid and electrolyte losses, and who can reliably drink fluid and follow medical instructions can be safely treated and sent home. Follow-up must be available with a health care practitioner. Individuals with diabetes who are vomiting should be admitted to the hospital or urgent care center for further observation and treatment. In cases of mild dehydration with borderline diabetic ketoacidosis, you may be treated and released from the emergency department providing that you are reliable and will promptly follow-up with your health care practitioner. Whether you are released to go home or monitored in the hospital, it is important th Continue reading >>

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