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Is Dka Hyperglycemia?

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Malaise, generalized weakness, and fatigability Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia Rapid weight loss in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: Gl Continue reading >>

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  1. petron

    I currently eat an apple, banana and sometimes an orange as snacks during the day along with nuts and other lo-carb foods. While I know fiber can offset some carbs like in apples, but is it worth it to eat fruit?
    I love apples and usually eat a banana before I work out so giving those up would be tough.
    Thoughts?

  2. humbled

    Here are some "average" numbers for these fruits:
    Apple: 21g carb
    Banana: 24g carb
    Orange: 14g carb
    So... since your other foods are not zero carb, you're probably getting up to 100g carb per day. That's low carb, and you may even lose weight, but it's unlikely to be keto.

  3. petron

    I thought that the fiber canceled out the carbs in fruits. But bananas look like they are loaded with sugars and carbs as angechilada points out.
    Will have to revise my snack menu.

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may Continue reading >>

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  1. kristafb

    Just wanted to share with you all. I am not endorsing the site, know nothing about them other than someone on the facebook group posted the link & the price for the box of 50, even with $15 shipping (for canada anyway) is decent.
    http://www.storenvy.com/stores/194693-ketosis-tools

  2. Booksandbeaches

    Thanks!

  3. EddieHaskell97

    I hate them as a company, but Wally-World sells them for $6.84.
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/ReliOn-Ketone-Test-Strips-50-count/33574014

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Hyperglycemic crises: Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HHNK) versus DKA. See DKA video here: https://youtu.be/r2tXTjb7EqU This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/g... Voice by: Penelope Hammet Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or HHS, is another ACUTE and life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. It develops slower than DKA, typically in the course of several days, but has a much higher mortality rate. Like DKA, HHS is triggered when diabetic patients suffer from ADDITIONAL physiologic stress such as infections, other illness, INadequate diabetic treatment or certain drugs. Similar to DKA, the RISE in COUNTER-regulatory hormones is the major culprit. These hormones stimulate FURTHER production and release of glucose into the blood, causing it to overflow into urine, resulting in excessive LOSS of water and electrolytes. The major DIFFERENCE between HHS and DKA is the ABSENCE of acidosis in HHS. This is because, unlike DKA, the level of insulin in HHS patients is HIGH enough to SUPPRESS lipolysis and hence ketogenesis. This explains why HHS occurs more often in type 2 diabetics, who have more or less normal level of circulating insulin. Reminder: type 2 diabetics DO produce insulin but their cells do NOT respond to insulin and therefore cannot use glucose. Because symptoms of acidosis are NOT present, development of HHS may go UNnoticed until blood glucose levels become EXTREMELY high. Severe dehydration results in INcreased concentrations of solutes in the blood, raising its osmolarity. HyPERosmotic blood plasma drives water OUT of bodys tissues causing cellular dysfunction. Primary symptom of HHS is ALTERED consciousness due to excessive dehydration of brain tissues. This can range from confusion to coma. Emergency treatment consists of intravenous fluid, insulin and potassium similar to those used in DKA.

Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka), And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State (hhs)

Go to: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) are acute metabolic complications of diabetes mellitus that can occur in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Timely diagnosis, comprehensive clinical and biochemical evaluation, and effective management is key to the successful resolution of DKA and HHS. Critical components of the hyperglycemic crises management include coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, and electrolyte replacement along with the continuous patient monitoring using available laboratory tools to predict the resolution of the hyperglycemic crisis. Understanding and prompt awareness of potential of special situations such as DKA or HHS presentation in comatose state, possibility of mixed acid-base disorders obscuring the diagnosis of DKA, and risk of brain edema during the therapy are important to reduce the risks of complications without affecting recovery from hyperglycemic crisis. Identification of factors that precipitated DKA or HHS during the index hospitalization should help prevent subsequent episode of hyperglycemic crisis. For extensive review of all related areas of Endocrinology, visit WWW.ENDOTEXT. Continue reading >>

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  1. MarkM

    Originally Posted by 10xdiabetic
    ... the units of insulin I am having to take seem excessive. I feel my body is no longer sensitive to the insulin. ... Getting most calories from fat can be expected to reduce insulin sensitivity. There is a whole lot of science behind this, but the bottom line is that when in ketosis (eating low carb, high fat), we need a lot more insulin than the consumed carbs suggests. So you will have to adjust insulin dosing accordingly. Once you have done that, maintaining good control should get a lot easier.
    I gave up on the ketogenic diet because sticking to it was just too hard. Especially in China, where I have been living for a while. After switching back to a 'normal' diet, my control became somewhat more difficult, but my insulin requirements went down. I have become more insulin sensitive, and my TDD is now lower than it has ever been. Using a pump also helps with that, but I suspect that much of the difference is because of less fat in the diet.

  2. hughman

    The only thing constant about insulin dosing for me over the last 40+ years is change. At one point I was taking at least a total of 120 units a day, but that was with massive aspartame consumption. Once I stopped diet pop (soda), I now take a total of around 60 units, and take it totally differently amounts at different times than I used to. I could take less insulin if I ate less carbs, but we all make our decisions on our lifestyle.
    Everyone is different, and our environment and what we consume effects us all differently. And women have it even tougher with those pesky hormones.

  3. 10xdiabetic

    Thank you for that insight. This is what my feeling was also. I tried to find science to confirm my hypothesis. Could you share an article / source where you read about that so I can explore this further?

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