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Is Breast Milk Ketogenic

Did You Know All Babies Are Born In Ketosis And Breastfeeding Keeps You In Ketosis?

Did You Know All Babies Are Born In Ketosis And Breastfeeding Keeps You In Ketosis?

Just a guy who wants to help make the world a healthier, happier place by spreading the word about the amazing benefits of the ketogenic diet and RapidKetosis. ​I am happily married to my beautiful wife, Audrey, of 24 years. And father of the two sweetest, kindest, and most caring girls ever - Katie & Olivia! I love Jesus Christ, my family and my friends, in that order. I really like the Dallas Cowboys, Spider-man, Journey and Def Leopard. I am the Co-Founder of RapidKetosis: Makers of RapidKetosis. I am a Certified Health Coach, Certified Personal Trainer, Author of two weight loss books, one award winning screenplay, and one graphic novel. I have had my film, The Benefits of Lifting Weights for Women win two film festivals and was shown at the Cannes Film Festival. ​I have helped thousands of friends lose thousands of pounds of fat over the last 25 years. I have two State of Georgia USAPL raw Bench Press Records. I will do whatever I can to help you understand the benefits of eating a high fat, low carb diet and how RapidKetosis helps get you into ketosis faster, easier and forever. ​Just ask. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Breastfeeding And Milk Supply

Low Carb Breastfeeding And Milk Supply

Almost every woman wants to lose weight. This is even truer after the birth of a beautiful child that you’ve anticipated for the previous 9 months. But now that your baby is here and you’re nursing, you might wonder how, or if, you can do low carb breastfeeding. The answer is: yes, you can do low carb breastfeeding to lose weight and no, it will not affect your baby. Read on to find out why low carb breastfeeding will not affect your milk supply. The human body needs ZERO carbs to survive. Milk 101 Breast milk is made on a supply and demand basis. It is NOT made on a diet and demand basis. This means the more frequent your baby is at the breast suckling, the more milk your body will produce. It may take your breast milk supply a few days to catch up to baby’s needs and milk requirements but the human body is a remarkable thing. It knows exactly how much to make and when, but sometimes there are problems. These problems could arise from improper latching techniques to inverted nipples to a child’s illness (decreased thirst/hunger), or dehydration. Before you can blame your diet for a low milk supply or think that low carb dieting might lower it, ask yourself this. Ask yourself, “Will having pizza tonight increase my breast milk supply?” If you laughed at that question, that means you probably already have a good idea that your diet doesn’t directly impact your milk supply. Low Carb Breastfeeding Myth It is a myth that consuming fewer carbs reduces your milk supply. There’s no telltale sign where this myth came from, but there are a few things you should keep in mind. Before carbs were commercially produced in excess quantities (see an article about this here) on factory lines all across the globe, Americans consumed far fewer carbohydrates than we do toda Continue reading >>

Is It Ok To Try A Ketogenic Diet While Breastfeeding? An Expert Explains

Is It Ok To Try A Ketogenic Diet While Breastfeeding? An Expert Explains

Ashley Batz/Romper I've tried all the diets. All of them. I've done Weight Watchers and juice fasts and Paleo and low-fat diets. After I had my daughter, I knew I wanted to lose the weight I'd put on, but I was also worried that it would affect my milk production. I'd heard good things about a type of Paleo diet that a lot of my mom friends did to great results, but was it safe? Is it OK to try a Ketogenic diet while breastfeeding? Ketogenic diets are very high fat and very low carbohydrate diets, like Atkins and Paleo, which force your body into what is called "ketosis." Ketosis, according to the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, is when your body runs out of normal energy (carbohydrate) stores in your body and begins burning the fat reserves as energy instead. There have been several studies showing many benefits of a keto diet. For instance, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) often find that their symptoms are lessened when they follow a strictly keto diet. For women who've had a baby and have PCOS, the first period after birth is often horrific. I know mine was. Therefore, anything to ameliorate its effects is more than welcome. Your body is shocked enough from having a human ripped from your loins, and then a few months later, your ovaries decide to declare war on your abdomen. Even so, can you stay on a keto diet while breastfeeding? Giphy There is some research out there that points to possible consequences for the baby if the mother chooses to maintain a ketogenic diet while breastfeeding. According to The American Journal of Physiology, the maintenance of a ketogenic diet while pregnant and breastfeeding may correlate to a decreased level of triglycerides in the liver of the offspring. However, this was a scientific study performed on rats, and Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet While Breastfeeding: Is It Safe For New Moms?

Low Carb Diet While Breastfeeding: Is It Safe For New Moms?

Carbs still have a bad reputation in the dieting world, so it’s not surprising that many new mothers think that cutting out carbs will help them lose the baby weight quickly. While there are many effective and healthy low-carb diets out there, they aren’t all safe for a breastfeeding mom. The biggest concern is that carbohydrate restriction could interfere with your milk supply, so let’s take a closer look at the risks and benefits to a low-carb diet while breastfeeding. The Potential Risks of a Low Carb Diet While Breastfeeding The La Lech League has done a good job identifying the risks of cutting carbs while breastfeeding. Here are some of their concerns: Restricting carbohydrates can cause a mother to lose weight rapidly, and rapid weight loss is generally not advised while breastfeeding. It could interfere with milk supply when taken to the extreme. Low-carb diets can put you into a state of ketosis, which means that ketones are potentially included in your breastmilk. Little research has been done on the impact of ketones on a growing baby, so this is a big reason most professionals recommend that breastfeeding mothers include healthy carbs like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in their meal plans. Dieters often increase the use of artificial sweeteners when cutting carbs. While there is no scientific proof that these sweeteners are dangerous while breastfeeding, many mothers choose to stay away from them. There are some natural sweeteners that are approved for a low-carb diet, so you may want to stick with those! The La Leche League also points out that low-carb diets are generally higher in protein and fat than is recommended for breastfeeding mothers, but they also point out that this isn’t a major concern. You do need protein while breastfeeding, a Continue reading >>

Babies In Ketosis

Babies In Ketosis

This post topic was inspired by the following article: Ketosis - key to human babies’ big brains? It is hosted on Tim Noakes' website and written by one of his associates in nutritional information misdirection, Tamzyn Murphy Campbell, RD. I'm going to address this misdirection and the disturbing parts of this article vis a vis Campbell in a future BabyGate Files, but for now I want to discuss the role of ketones in metabolism. In doing so, I'd also like to explain my somewhat cryptic recent post on heating my kitchen. (I've C&P'd that entire post to the end further down in this one, so if you don't wish to go to another page, you can just scroll down to The Kitchen Heating Analogy). I'm going to structure this post a little differently than most and get to my point, then provide the back up information. Let's see how this goes. The major source (6 of 12 numbered citations, 1 of 6 unique sources) for her article is: Survival of the fattest: fat babies were the key to evolution of the large human brain (2003) Stephen C. Cunnane, Michael A. Crawford (I'll call this C&C) In this paper, they make the following points: Human babies have higher body fat than other mammals and this may be as a source of ketones in early infancy. Infants have slightly elevated ketones (mild ketonemia) regardless of feeding status which differs from adults who only have elevated ketones when food is restricted (no details here). Glucose is the primary fuel for the human brain Ketones are an alternate source of fuel when glucose is less available Ketones "appear to be" an essential fuel for the midterm fetus, and may provide as much as 30% of the developing brain's needs Ketones are both an energy source and carbon source for fat and cholesterol synthesis in the brain. Campbell relates these so Continue reading >>

Initiating And Maintaining The Ketogenic Diet In Breastfed Infants

Initiating And Maintaining The Ketogenic Diet In Breastfed Infants

Abstract The ketogenic diet has been used as an effective treatment for intractable epilepsy since 1921. Its efficacy in the treatment of epilepsy in infants has been reported to be similar to that in older children. However, there have been no reports in the literature addressing the possibility of continuing breastfeeding during treatment with the ketogenic diet. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of the patients initiated on the ketogenic diet and identified 5 infants who continued to receive breast milk while on the ketogenic diet treatment. All 5 experienced a >90% reduction of seizures during the first month on the ketogenic diet treatment with continued breastfeeding. Four of the 5 were able to maintain >90% reduction of seizures for the duration of their time receiving breast milk while on the ketogenic diet treatment. Traditionally, infants have discontinued breastfeeding prior to diet initiation because of the concern that the carbohydrates in the breast milk will prevent attaining adequate levels of ketosis. It is the authors’ experience with these 5 patients that infants can continue to breastfeed while successfully using the ketogenic diet for seizure treatment. Continue reading >>

Babies In Ketosis

Babies In Ketosis

BABIES THRIVE IN KETOSIS Breast milk is naturally very high in fat. If a newborn is breastfed, it spends a lot of time in ketosis and is therefore keto-adapted. Keto-adapted babies can efficiently turn ketone bodies into acetyl-coA and myelin. Ketosis helps babies develop and build their brains. Click HERE to read a great article about Babies in Ketosis. The lean human body is 74% fat and 26% protein (broken down by calories). Fats are a structural part of every human cell and are the preferred fuel source of the mitochondria, the energy-burning units of each cell. A fetus naturally uses ketones before and immediately after birth. Many studies done on pregnant pigs that are placed on ketogenic diets show fetuses with increased fetal brain weight, cell size, and protein content. In the early stages of pregnancy, there is an upsurge in body fat accumulation, which is connected to hyperphagia and increased lipogenesis. In the later stages of pregnancy, there is an accelerated breakdown of fat depots, which plays an important role in fetal development. The fetus uses fatty acids from the placenta as well as two other products, glycerol and ketone bodies. Even though glycerol goes through the placenta in small proportions, it is a superior substrate for “maternal gluconeogenesis.” Heightened ketogenesis in fasting conditions, or with the addition of MCT oils, create an easy transference of ketones to the fetus. This transfer allows maternal ketone bodies to reach the fetus, where the ketones can be used as fuels for oxidative metabolism as well as lipogenic substrates. Fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E, and K which are essential in the formation of healthy fetuses. Full fat dairy is also filled with healthy cholesterol, but I do find some clients to be dairy sensitive. F Continue reading >>

I Am Breastfeeding My Baby And I Want To Lose Weight. Is A Low Carbohydrate Diet Safe For A Breastfeeding Mother?

I Am Breastfeeding My Baby And I Want To Lose Weight. Is A Low Carbohydrate Diet Safe For A Breastfeeding Mother?

Many women are anxious to get back in shape after childbirth, but we must remember that pregnancy weight wasn’t gained overnight, and won’t disappear quickly, either. It is wise for mothers to wait until two months postpartum to purposely lose weight, as the mother’s body needs time to recover from childbirth and establish a good milk supply. Many mothers find that by following a sensible diet they are able to lose weight steadily while breastfeeding. Anyone who wants to start a weight loss diet should consult with their physician to rule out any health problems that would contraindicate the diet. If a breastfeeding mother is interested in any type of weight loss diet, there are several factors she should consider. Nutritional balance-- A breastfeeding mother should receive adequate and balanced nutrition, for her breastfed baby’s sake, and the sake of her own health. Otherwise, she risks depleting her body’s nutritional stores. A malnourished mother may have inadequate levels of vitamins A, D, B6 and B12 in her milk, and may risk decreased milk supply. Hunger-- Inadequate caloric intake results in feeling weak, tired, and drained. When a mother feels this way, taking care of a baby is very difficult, and these very real feelings can result in lowered milk supply and inhibited milk ejection (letdown) reflex. The Subcommittee on Nutrition during Lactation advises breastfeeding mothers to take in 1500-1800 calories per day. Rate of weight loss-- Gradual weight loss has not been found to affect either the mother’s milk supply or the baby’s health. However, there are documented concerns when a breastfeeding mother loses weight rapidly, defined as more than a pound (.45 kg) per week. Toxins, such as environmental contaminants PCBs and pesticides, are stored in Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Guidelines For Infants

Ketogenic Diet Guidelines For Infants

History of the Ketogenic Diet in Infants For many decades, the idea of using the ketogenic diet for infants with epilepsy was discouraged. Concerns were raised in chapters and books about the diet that infants were highly likely to become hypoglycemic, have complications, and unlikely to achieve ketosis. Although infants often have seizures, and at times very difficult-to-control seizures, until the 1990s, we also did not have pre-made, commercially-available ketogenic diet infant formulas. Even though most anticonvulsant drugs are not FDA-approved for use in infants, this was the main treatment option for most child neurologists. What’s New Things have changed drastically in the last few years. Published research has shown that not only can infants become ketotic, but they respond very well to dietary therapy. In fact, infantile spasms is one of the established "indications" for ketogenic diet treatment. An article from last year by Dr. Anastasia Dressler from Vienna even stated, "The ketogenic diet is highly effective and well tolerated in infants with epilepsy. Seizure freedom is more often achieved and maintained in infants." Adding to this rising tide of acceptance, the European Journal of Paediatric Neurology published guidelines for the use of ketogenic diets in infancy (defined as less than 2 years of age) this month. This was a group effort from 15 neurologists and dietitians with particular expertise in using ketogenic diet in infancy, convened at a conference in London in April 2015. What does this guideline say? Much of it is information about infants that already has been established and is similar to older children. The authors comment that the ketogenic diet can be helpful for infantile spasms, epilepsy with migrating seizures, and GLUT-1 deficiency (al Continue reading >>

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Humans are unique in their remarkable ability to enter ketosis. They’re also situated near the top of the food chain. Coincidence? During starvation, humans rapidly enter ketosis; they do this better than king penguins, and bears don’t do it at all. Starvation ketosis Humans maintain a high level of functionality during starvation. We can still hunt & plan; some would even argue it’s a more finely tuned state, cognitively. And that’s important, because if we became progressively weaker and slower, chances of acquiring food would rapidly decline. Perhaps this is why fasting bears just sleep most of the time: no ketones = no bueno..? Animals with a low brain/carcass weight ratio (ie, small brain) don’t need it. Babies and children have a higher brain/carcass weight ratio, so they develop ketosis more rapidly than adults. Is this a harmful process? No, more likely an evolutionary adaptation which supports the brain. The brain of newborn babies consumes a huge amount of total daily energy, and nearly half comes from ketones. A week or so later, even after the carbohydrate content of breast milk increases, they still don’t get “kicked out of ketosis” (Bourneres et al., 1986). If this were a harmful state, why would Nature have done this? …and all those anecdotes, like babies learn at incredibly rapid rates… coincidence? Maybe they’re myths. Maybe not. Ketosis in the animal kingdom Imagine a hibernating bear: huge adipose tissue but small brain fuel requirement relative to body size and total energy expenditure. No ketosis, because brain accounts for less than 5% of total metabolism. In adult humans, this is around 19-23%, and babies are much higher (eg, Cahill and Veech, 2003 & Hayes et al., 2012). For the rest of this article and more, head over to Pat Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Prof Noakes is on trial for ‘advising’ a mom to wean her baby onto low carb, high fat foods. Could babies’ innate ketosis – a state more often associated with low-carb, high-fat diets – be an arrow in Prof Noakes’ defence’s quiver? By Tamzyn Murphy Campbell BSc, BSc Med(Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics, RD Did you know that human newborns and exclusively breastfed babies are in ketosis? 1 I am a dietitian, with two years of intensive postgraduate training in nutrition, and I didn’t realise this until just over a month ago. The fact that human babies are naturally in ketosis is an inconvenient truth because it implies that ketosis (which also occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet) is not only a natural metabolic state for human infants, but that it’s probably beneficial too. Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. 2 “Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. ” A word on ketones and ketosis Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body uses fat as fuel in preference to carbohydrates – as occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. The body makes ketones from fat, when dietary glucose (from carbohydrates and sugar) is low. Ketones can be used as fuel to produce the energy your body and brain needs to function. The human brain only has two options for fuel: glucose or ketones. The other body orga Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding While In Ketosis: Round 2

Breastfeeding While In Ketosis: Round 2

Since my baby has been growing great, no issues breastfeeding, etc, and I found myself trending lower and lower in my daily carb counts; I decided I was going into full-on Keto again. I tend to average between 20 and 40 carbs per day. After a couple of days with this limit, I noticed Natalie wanted to nurse practically all day long. It seemed like a small drop in supply, as expected. However, the very next day my letdowns seemed normal, and I got the usual breaks between feedings. If some one else is consuming a high carb diet and wants to make the change with younger babies (~4+ months old), I would recommend starting at 100g carbs per day, and cutting 5g each day and monitoring your supply as you go along. More important than carb count while breastfeeding is your water and caloric intake. Be sure to be constantly drinking water; if you feel thirsty then you are already a little bit dehydrated. If you are having trouble with your calorie counts, I highly recommend MyFitnessPal. Great, intuitive site (and love the app!) with an extensive food database. Above all else, I recommend going gradually into ketosis and calorie restriction while breastfeeding, especially if your baby is young, and if you are not at home with the baby for unlimited nursing during the potential conversion. Check out my previous posts on breastfeeding while in ketosis - Low Carb or Keto While Breastfeeding Keto and Breastfeeding Introduction Keto While Breastfeeding: Days 1-5 Keto and the Breastfeeding Diet TIPS Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding

Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding

High protein, low carbohydrate diets like the Atkins diet and the South Beach diet are very popular. These diets can be helpful for diabetics and people with gluten intolerance. In these diets, protein and high fat foods are not restricted; vegetables are limited. The main difference between Atkins and South Beach seems to be that the South Beach diet is less structured and emphasizes eating healthier, mostly unsaturated fats. The primary objections I’ve seen to these and similar diets — and this applies to everyone, not just nursing mothers — is simply the fact that they are not balanced and thus have the potential to make you feel unwell. These diets tend to be low in phytochemicals, antioxidants and folic acid. They also tend to be low in fiber and minerals (including calcium, magnesium, phosphorus & potassium), and the Atkins diet may be high in saturated fats. Because of this, long-term adherence to these diets may increase your risk for various health problems. Since some of the weight loss from these diets is simply due to water loss, dehydration is a risk if the dieter is not careful to drink plenty of water. Some moms have found that very low carb diets decrease milk supply. Going off the diet generally brings milk volume right back up again. This decrease in milk supply may be due to several factors: Dehydration. The sudden decrease in calories when mom goes on the diet. If a woman is used to a certain level of calories, an abrupt drop due to dieting (or illness) may reduce her milk supply. This sudden decrease in calories can tell mom’s body that she is in “starvation mode” and to conserve on all fronts (thus less of her body’s resources go into making milk). Insufficient caloric intake. With a low carb diet, many people are not nearly as hungry Continue reading >>

Atkins For Breastfeeding Mothers

Atkins For Breastfeeding Mothers

For new mothers, losing weight is probably the furthest thing from their minds and in my opinion, this is exactly as it should be. I think that in our culture mothers are sometimes expected to bounce back to ‘normal’ as though nothing has changed! In reality, everything has changed and you have a lot more important things to think about in those first few weeks or months. As well as getting to know your baby, establishing breastfeeding, adjusting your sleeping patterns and often your expectations you need to try to give yourself time to rest and recover. However, at some point when you feel ready to begin losing the baby weight and you have consulted with your doctor, the Atkins Nutritional Approach is an excellent choice. This is true no matter how you feed your baby but when breastfeeding there are some extra considerations so I’ll focus on these for this article. Won’t breastfeeding make me lose the baby weight? While breastfeeding certainly helps with losing the baby weight more quickly, it’s not a magic fix. Just as you cannot ‘out-train a bad diet’ you can’t ‘out-breastfeed a bad diet’ either! There are many many regular gym goers and marathon runners that are overweight proving that exercise alone will not make you lose weight. In the same way, it stands to reason that if your diet is not good, the extra calories needed for breastfeeding will not make you lose the baby weight either. Should I wait until the baby is weaned? Sometimes you may see the advice to wait until the baby is weaned before starting a diet. However the World Health Organisation say: “Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended up to 6 months of age, with continued breastfeeding along with appropriate complementary foods up to two years of age or beyond.” Obviously, the deci Continue reading >>

A Gestational Ketogenic Diet Alters Maternal Metabolic Status As Well As Offspring Physiological Growth And Brain Structure In The Neonatal Mouse

A Gestational Ketogenic Diet Alters Maternal Metabolic Status As Well As Offspring Physiological Growth And Brain Structure In The Neonatal Mouse

Go to: Abstract The use of the ketogenic diet (KD) among women of child-bearing age has been increasing, leading to increased interest in identifying the diet’s suitability during gestation. To date, no studies have thoroughly investigated the effect of a gestational KD on offspring growth. Since ketones have been reported to play a role in cerebral lipid and myelin synthesis, it is particularly important to investigate the diet’s impact on brain anatomy of the offspring. To fill this knowledge gap we imaged CD-1 mouse neonates whose mothers were fed either a standard diet (SD) or a KD prior to and during gestation. Images were collected at postnatal (P) 11.5 and 21.5 using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Maternal metabolic status was also tracked during lactation, by following their body weight, blood glucose, ketone, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations. Results The KD dams exhibit a significant reduction in maternal fertility and litter size, as well as a high risk of developing fatal ketoacidosis by mid-lactation. To increase survival of the KD dams and offspring, fostering of P2.5 pups (from both KD and SD litters) by SD-foster dams was carried out. This resulted in stabilization of blood ketones of the KD dams, and aversion of the fatal ketoacidosis. We also note a slower and smaller weight loss for the KD compared with the SD dams. The average fostered KD pup exhibits retarded growth by P21.5 compared with the average fostered SD pup. An anatomical comparison of their brains further revealed significant structural differences at P11.5, and particularly at P21.5. The KD brain shows a relative bilateral decrease in the cortex, fimbria, hippocampus, corpus callosum and lateral ventricle, but a relative volumetric enlargement of the hypothalamus and med Continue reading >>

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