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Is A Low Carb Diet Good For A Diabetic?

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In this Low Carb Chicken and Salad Recipe I make an easy Low Carb Chicken and Salad in Minutes that any one can make with very little cooking skills. This is great for low carb dieting and has all natural healthy ingredients. If you guys want to see more healthy recipes like this to help with your meal prep please comment below. I hope you guys enjoy the Video and it helps with your Health and Fitness Journey and to Achieve your Goals. Please remember to subscribe here for more videos weekly. https://www.youtube.com/user/justaddm... Also check out or Supplement Website for over 6000 brand name supplements at wholesale here:http://www.justaddmuscle.com/ and use code youtube for a 10% discount on your entire order. Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/JustAddMuscl... Twitter:https://twitter.com/justaddmuscle Instagram http://instagram.com/justaddmuscle

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

After hearing for years that a high-carb, low-fat diet is the only real road to weight loss, you might be wondering how a low-carb diabetes diet can help you finally drop the pounds and help you get control of your blood sugar. Let us explain. The high-carb, low-fat idea basically oversimplified how food works once it enters your body. It ignored the fact that not all carbs are good, and glossed over that not all fats are bad. Therefore, we loaded up on all the breads, pastas, and low-fat goodies, never realizing that it was making us fatter. Here's how it really works. All carbs are converted to glucose and raise your blood sugar, but they aren't all converted at the same rate. How fast they are absorbed--and how much--is what affects your weight. There are two general classes of carbs--refined and unrefined. Refined carbs (white breads, white flour, pastas) are essentially refined sugars, meaning once you eat them they are quickly turned into glucose in your system. Unrefined carbs are the kinds found in whole grains, beans, fruits, and many vegetables. The fiber in these foods helps to slow down your body's absorption of carbs, therefore slowing the process of turning carbs into Continue reading >>

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  1. holymolysoly

    I am on day 21 and my husband has remarked on several occasions that my breath is absolutely horrific and offensive. After some searching in this forum and online, it seems the most likely culprits are ketosis and acetone breath from the over-consumption of protein? I dont think either of these are possible culprits, but over the last few days, I have increased my starchy veggie consumption to two per day and my husband said it hasn't helped. I am a nursing mamma to an almost 2 year old, so I figured I could use the extra starchy veggie because he still nurses 4 to 6 times in a 24 hour period. I follow the meal template fairly strictly so I don't think I am lacking or overdoing it in terms of protein or plant based starches/carbs. I feel great and want to continue with a very slow reintroduction of just a few things but my husband said he can barely tolerate the next 9 days and he is looking forward to me eating "normally" and my bad breath issue resolving ASAP. Any suggestions ? I really would like to make this way of eating a lifestyle and the breath issue is the only impediment for me.

  2. ladyshanny

    On July 25, 2016 at 10:12 PM, holymolysoly said:



    I am on day 21 and my husband has remarked on several occasions that my breath is absolutely horrific and offensive. After some searching in this forum and online, it seems the most likely culprits are ketosis and acetone breath from the over-consumption of protein? I dont think either of these are possible culprits, but over the last few days, I have increased my starchy veggie consumption to two per day and my husband said it hasn't helped. I am a nursing mamma to an almost 2 year old, so I figured I could use the extra starchy veggie because he still nurses 4 to 6 times in a 24 hour period. I follow the meal template fairly strictly so I don't think I am lacking or overdoing it in terms of protein or plant based starches/carbs. I feel great and want to continue with a very slow reintroduction of just a few things but my husband said he can barely tolerate the next 9 days and he is looking forward to me eating "normally" and my bad breath issue resolving ASAP. Any suggestions ? I really would like to make this way of eating a lifestyle and the breath issue is the only impediment for me.
    Hi,
    The most common culprits is ketosis but could also be from dehydration causing dry mouth which allows bacteria to breed.
    If would be most helpful if you would outline your last few days of food including portion sizes, specific vegetables/fat types and quantities, fluids, exercise etc. We can take a look and see if anything stands out.

  3. holymolysoly

    Thanks so much for the response. I generally walk between 5-7 miles a day and sleep is disrupted with several night time wake-ups since my son does not sleep through the night yet.
    Here's what my days have looked like:
    M1 - 3 scrambled eggs cooked in ghee
    1/3 of a 6 inch in diameter acorn squash drizzled with some EVOO
    1 trader joe's bag of organic spinach, steamed to yield about a cup
    1/2 cup coconut milk in coffee
    M2 - 3 turkey meatballs (each a bit smaller than a tennis ball),
    1 cup home made complaint marinara
    2 cups green beans (steamed)
    2 tbsp ghee mixed into marinara after cooking
    M3 - 1 and a half boneless skinless chicken thighs cooked into a curry with
    1 cup broccoli, 1/2 cup red peppers
    Served atop cauli rice with 1-2 tbsp of ghee mixed in after cooking
    Yesterday
    M1 - Fritatta made with 2 eggs, 1/4 cup ground chicken, asparagus, zucchini, onions, spinach
    roasted potatoes with herbs
    1/2 cup coconut milk with coffee
    M2 - Buffalo chicken spaghetti squash bake (PaleoOMG recipe)
    Mixed greens with tomato and cucumber, EVOO and balsamic
    M3 - ground turkey with 2 cups of veggies (same as in morning fritatta) with 1-2 tbsp of ghee mixed in after cooking
    I practice good oral hygeine and brush and floss twice a day. I have been carrying around mouth wash and using that several times a day as well. I can't tell that my breath smells bad. Also, I never had this issue before W30, and do not have any underlying medical conditions that could be causing this. My husband mentioned bad breath to me the last time I did a W30 in October of 2013, but he doesn't recall it being as severe as it is now. About a week ago, I ate squash or potato at every meal for 2 or 3 days and my husband said it wasn't as rancid but that he could still smell it.

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Take the Body Type Quiz: http://bit.ly/TakeBodyTypeQuiz If you wanted to acidify your stomach, try the Digest Formula (which has both apple cider vinegar and betaine chlorophyll): https://bit.ly/2JD8zNc Dr. Berg talks about the difference in eating raw vegetables and cooked vegetables. The purpose of eating the vegetables is to get the vitamins and minerals from a good source. Raw vegetables are a good source of enzymes which help to breakdown food in your body. If you have missing enzymes either from your pancreas or from your gut (the friendly bacteria make enzymes). This could be a lack of stomach acid because it takes an acid stomach to release pancreatic enzymes OR maybe you had a antibiotics in the past, which destroyed your friendly bacteria. This might cause your body to have acid reflux, gurd or constipation. He suggests slowly introducing certain veggies into the diet over time to allow the microbes to grow and adapt to this new digestion. Cooked vegetables might not have the vitamins but are a good souce of minerals that are required by the body. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 50 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional and natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government and the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning, published by KB Publishing in January 2011. Dr. Berg trains chiropractors, physicians and allied healthcare practitioners in his methods, and to date he has trained over 2,500 healthcare professionals. He has been an active member of the Endocrinology Society, and has worked as a past part-time adjunct professor at Howard University. DR. BERG'S VIDEO BLOG: http://www.drberg.com/blog FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/DrEricBergDC TWITTER: http://twitter.com/DrBergDC YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/drericbe... ABOUT DR. BERG: http://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/bio DR. BERG'S SEMINARS: http://www.drberg.com/seminars DR. BERG'S STORY: http://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/story DR. BERG'S CLINIC: https://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/c... DR. BERG'S HEALTH COACHING TRAINING: http://www.drberg.com/weight-loss-coach DR. BERG'S SHOP: http://shop.drberg.com/ DR. BERG'S REVIEWS: http://www.drberg.com/reviews The Health & Wellness Center 4709 D Pinecrest Office Park Drive Alexandria, VA 22312 703-354-7336 Disclaimer: Dr. Eric Berg received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1988. His use of doctor or Dr. in relation to himself solely refers to that degree. Dr. Berg is a licensed chiropractor in Virginia, California, and Louisiana, but he no longer practices chiropractic in any state and does not see patients. This video is for general informational purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, cure, treatment, diagnosis, and prescription or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Berg and you. You should not make any change in your health regimen or diet before first consulting a physician and obtaining a medical exam, diagnosis, and recommendation. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The Health & Wellness, Dr. Berg Nutritionals and Dr. Eric Berg, D.C. are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.

8 Low-carb Veggies For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 Best Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet When you have type 2 diabetes, eating low-carb vegetables is a smart way to fill up without filling out your waistline — or spiking your blood sugar levels. Non-starchy or low-carbohydrate veggies are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber while still being low in calories. It’s always smart to eat a rainbow-colored diet, but the following veggies are among the best. Continue reading >>

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  1. kbla

    I'm on Day 16 of my Whole30 and up until about day 14, I felt good, energy was up and my skin was just as clear and even and wrinkle-free as ever. By the evening of day 14, my face was hideous -- blotchy, red bumps and itchy. My eczema was one of the reasons I started this -- now, it is worse! It is all around my bra (no detergent change, so spare me that suggestion; I use unscented, sensitive), back of my legs, lower back and FACE!!!!! I can't cover my face!!! I'm in sales. Now, I'm in a deep dark depression and convinced that this is hopeless. Even if I do get healthy and skinny, I'll be hideous with all this skin stuff. I've read about sugar detox causing the rash, ketosis causing the rash (I've done every low carb diet and this never happened) and food allergies. I'm not eating anything different from before -- more veggies, actually having fruit, not too many nuts at all -- only thing that has increased is eggs, but I already did as low carb as possible, so eggs have been on my menu. I have changed nothing in my soaps, make up, lotions, etc. This has to be a reaction to Whole30. I need feedback from others who have experienced this, so that I can decide if continuing is an option.

  2. kirkor

    There was a thread on here recently where an actress/model quit due to similar symptoms as you describe. She didn't want to risk the adjustment period being much longer than she already experienced.
    Not having this happen to me firsthand, I can't help but wonder if "the worst is over"? People in sales are human too, breakouts happen to the best of us ... wouldn't short-term social and/or professional awkwardness be worth a lifetime of improved health and self-knowledge?

  3. kbla

    I spackled on make up yesterday and today to go to work. Fixed my hair to cover it and tried to make calls in accounts that basically require me dropping off goodies, so I didn't have to be too close to any of the doctors (medical sales=beauty pageant all day long). I'd love to see that thread. If you remember the name, let me know. I took a xysol (sp?) and have been slathering on cortisone at night. Thinking about a bottle of wine to retox and balance it out, lol.

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Should I count fiber as carbs? Discover the difference between total carbs and net carbs and figure out how to save yourself a lot of carbs DAILY in this video! Total Carbs= all carbs listed on the nutrition label while Net Carbs= total carbs minus fiber listed on the nutrition label. Also learn the importance of fiber. Learn how to calculate net carbs. Looking to increase your gains and build more muscle? Looking to burn more fat? Try out Yellowstone Nutraceuitcals amazing, science backed, safe supplement line here and use the coupon code "atimbers10" for 10% off your purchase: https://yellowstonenutra.com/shop-lan... Follow me on: Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/aestheticby... Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/yourmacroman... Twitter- https://twitter.com/DeityAesthetics

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of t Continue reading >>

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  1. sonias

    3 This is my topic for this week in nursing school, respiratory & metabolic acidosis/ alkalosis. I am having trouble breaking it down. Can someone please help me understand this please? Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

  2. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

  3. Esme12

    Check out this tutorial
    Interactive Online ABG's acid base

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