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Is A Low Carb Diet Good For A Diabetic?

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In this Low Carb Chicken and Salad Recipe I make an easy Low Carb Chicken and Salad in Minutes that any one can make with very little cooking skills. This is great for low carb dieting and has all natural healthy ingredients. If you guys want to see more healthy recipes like this to help with your meal prep please comment below. I hope you guys enjoy the Video and it helps with your Health and Fitness Journey and to Achieve your Goals. Please remember to subscribe here for more videos weekly. https://www.youtube.com/user/justaddm... Also check out or Supplement Website for over 6000 brand name supplements at wholesale here:http://www.justaddmuscle.com/ and use code youtube for a 10% discount on your entire order. Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/JustAddMuscl... Twitter:https://twitter.com/justaddmuscle Instagram http://instagram.com/justaddmuscle

Low Carb

Tweet Many people with diabetes are following a low-carb diet because of its benefits in terms of improving diabetes control, weight loss and being a diet that is satisfying and easy to stick to. Low-carb diets are flexible and can be followed by people with different types of diabetes. The diet has allowed many people with type 2 diabetes to resolve their diabetes, that is to get their blood sugar levels into a non-diabetic range without the help of medication. People with type 1 diabetes have also reported much more stable blood sugar levels, making the condition easier to predict and manage. The diet is a healthy way of eating as vegetables and natural, real foods are integral to the diet. Low-carb guidance and support The low-carb diet forum has been cited as a leading resource in providing support and encouragement for people that are looking to achieve lower HbA1c levels and sustain effective weight loss. [127] In 2015, Diabetes.co.uk launched the Low Carb Program which has helped thousands of people with type 2 diabetes to improve their diabetes control and reduce their dependency on diabetes medication. Why follow a low-carb diet? Carbohydrate is the nutrient which has the Continue reading >>

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  1. sethboss

    Ketogenic diet bad for you

    http://life.familyeducation.com/nutr...ght/35884.html

    Bad Diets
    The diets listed here are unhealthy, especially for an athlete. These diets do not provide enough calories, nutrition, or the right kind of fuel. They strain body organs. Instead of improving health, they risk destroying it. The longer you are on these diets, the greater the risks become.
    Low-Carb/High-Protein Diets
    These diets, including the Atkins Diet, the Ketogenic Diet, the Zone Diet, and the Scarsdale Diet, are extremely popular because of the quick water-weight loss that occurs at the start of the diet. This water-weight loss is mistaken for fat loss, and it quickly returns as soon as the dieting stops. These diets make you look thin and trim because eating proteins is dehydrating, and causes large amounts of body water loss. Although bodybuilders might follow these diets to look more defined, they quickly gain the weight back after competition when they stop dieting. Aerobic athletes, dancers, and performance athletes cannot function effectively on these diets because protein and fats are a terrible source of performance fuel, and the body requires extra water and calories to break them down.
    High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets cause a state of ketosis, chronic dehydration, low appetite, bad breath, and also nausea and depression. These diets are especially dangerous for people with high blood pressure, heart disease, and kidney problems. They can also cause gout. High-protein diets also cause your body to lose calcium, increasing your risk of fractures and osteoporosis. In athletes, the oversupply of protein puts a tremendous strain on your kidneys, which are already stressed by the breakdown products of intense exercise and occasional dehydration; combining these two types of stress on the body can be very dangerous. Also, by missing out on healthy fiber and vitamins found in fruits, vegetables, and grains, you are putting yourself at greater risk of heart and blood vessel problems, digestive problems, and many types of cancer. Women who go off the diet in search of more normal eating tend to immediately gain back weight as the water weight returns. Also, studies have shown that these diets do not cause weight and fat loss any quicker than other types do over the long term. So why take the health risks?
    Wow this person totally rips into keto, what do you think about her argument?

  2. Brakh

    I think she's an idiot. She also probably goes to the gym, does 4 hours of cardio, and goes home. "What's a dumbbell? No you can't lift that, you can injure yourself. Just run, it's good for your heart."

  3. Atavis

    I await something very important... "proof".

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FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d... Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O6rsdo The carb cycling diet is one of my favorite diets because it is one of the fastest way to burn fat while retaining as much muscle as possible. Most people don't know that carb cycling is actually a form of ketogenic dieting. The ketogenic diet is a diet that is lower in carbohydrates, which makes our body convert more dietary fat and body fat in to keytones in the liver. Which it then goes on to use for energy. Like I've said in many of my videos the human body prefers to use carbs as its primary source of energy. You're body won't produce too many keytones on a high carbohydrate diet, because your body won't need extra energy from fat due to the fact that its getting its energy from the more preferred carbohydrates. The only way for our body to use more fat for energy is by not having its preferred source there all the time. Eliminating carbs completely, however can have many drawbacks on our health and well being. Protein, carbs, and fats are all important and necessary for our body. So in comes the cyclical ketogenic diet aka carb cycling and also known originally as the a

Low-carb Diet For Diabetes: Should You Try It?

Many diet-related conditions rely on medication. But the primary treatment for type 2 diabetes is diet and lifestyle change. There is growing evidence a low-carb diet may be a useful alternative to conventional diet advice. In fact, it may even be better. This article provides a transparent look at the best evidence available, and whether you should consider it. What Is A Low-Carb Diet? A low carb diet is an eating pattern that limits carbohydrate foods, such as sugary foods, flour and bread. There are several different versions, but they are generally high in protein, fat and healthy vegetables. The standard American diet is at least 50% carbs, which is about 300 grams per day. Low-carb diets range from about 30% down to 5%. Given the amount of carbs in your diet is the main determinant of blood sugar levels, it makes sense that reducing carb intake could be beneficial for diabetes care (1). Low- Carb and Diabetes: What Do Controlled Trials Show? Randomised controlled trials are considered the “gold standard” of scientific evidence. In this case researchers would feed one group of diabetics a standard American diet (typically 50-60% carbs), and another a strict low-carb diet f Continue reading >>

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  1. karryann2008

    Yesterday my mismanagement of my emotions resulted in a big carb binge.
    I want to get back into keto as quick as possible. I've got back to my normal eating today 120g p/ 30g cabs max, 90+g+ f
    I do a CKD having a controlled carb refeed every 2 weeks or so! And get back into keto usually after 36 hours.
    Not sure it will be as quick with what I ate!
    Is there anything else I can do to help? I lift 5 times a week and occasional cardio, will doing extra training sessions or cardio help?
    Or is it continue as usually and wait?
    I feel so good in Keto, pretty rubbish at the moment!

  2. Leonidas_meets_Spartacus

    Exercise does help sometimes, especially the high intensity cardio work outs. Your body starts making ketones when there isn't enough glucose for organs like brain. Burning those carbs at high intensity might help.

  3. karryann2008

    Exercise does help sometimes, especially the high intensity cardio work outs. Your body starts making ketones when there isn't enough glucose for organs like brain. Burning those carbs at high intensity might help. Thanks, so HIIT or circuit training would be worth a try!

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http://diabetes.blogstips.org/ What Are the Benefits of a Low-Carb Diet for Diabetics? | Diabetes Low Carb Diet There is much disagreement about a low-carbohydrate diet for diabetics, but there are many benefits for any person with diabetes who is able to control his or her calorie intake with this strategy. The greatest benefit for diabetics is the ability to control blood sugar levels with less reliance on outside controls such as medication or injectable insulin. Weight loss is a pleasant side effect of a low-carb diet for diabetics. Insulin resistance, which is a cell's refusal to react to insulin in the body, is decreased as well. Also, the side effects of diabetes, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and kidney impairment, are decreased because the body is better able to use glucose on a low-carb diet. A low-carb diet for diabetics focuses on keeping glucose low. Any carbohydrate - such as candy bars, fruits, breads or pasta - is eventually turned into sugar. Eating any of these will raise one's blood sugar. By sticking to a low-carb intake, a diabetic controls the amount of glucose that is put into his or her bloodstream. For this reason, the diabetic's blood gluco

Diabetes And Your Diet: The Low-carb Debate

A few years ago, Richard Kahn, the now-retired chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association, was charged with organizing a committee to prescribe a diet plan for people with diabetes. He began by looking at the evidence for different diets, asking which, if any, best controlled diabetes. “When you look at the literature, whoa is it weak. It is so weak,” Dr. Kahn said in a recent interview. Studies tended to be short term, diets unsustainable, differences among them clinically insignificant. The only thing that really seemed to help people with diabetes was weight loss — and for weight loss, there is no magic diet. But people want diet advice, Dr. Kahn reasoned, and the association really should say something about diets. So it, like the National Institutes of Health, went with the Department of Agriculture’s food pyramid. Why? “It’s a diet for all America,” Dr. Kahn said. “It has lots of fruits and vegetables and a reasonable amount of fat.” That advice, though, recently came under attack in a New York Times commentary written by Sarah Hallberg, an osteopath at a weight loss clinic in Indiana, and Osama Hamdy, the medical director of t Continue reading >>

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  1. wlsuser9

    I do a lot of reading about low carb/kenogenic diets, and typically I see people are in ketosis and losing weight between 20-60 net grams of carbs a day. I began my "low carb" (not low enough for some people) with a goal of <100 net grams a day, and I've lost about 2 lbs a week. My current calorie goal is 1200 because that's just what was recommended when I first joined myfitnesspal, and I really eat between 1100-1800 net calories, depending on my exercise and how many low carb snacks I decide to eat. I used ketostrips when I first started my diet, I had small to trace amounts detected and I was losing weight. I haven't used a test strip in a few weeks, but I've been keeping my carbs consistently lower than when I first started, anyway. I am on the cross country team at my college, so exercise is a necessity for me. I used to just eat whatever I wanted around 1200 calories a day, and would lose weight, but I couldn't stick to it and never got results like I have been eating a reduced carb amount.
    To anyone else who eats reduced carbs and exercises around 40 min a day 6 days a week, how many carbs do you eat to lose weight? Heck, even if you don't exercise, please let me know.
    I am probably going to buy more test strips to make sure I'm doing it right, but sometimes I think I might be eating too many carbs, and I just lose weight because of the amount of calories I eat. I just don't know! I hope to find somebody who can eat as many carbs as I do and still be burning fat!

  2. Carnivor0us

    I don't work out everyday, and when I do, it's just vigorous walking. I aim for as close to zero as possible, with no more than 75g in any one day. It's almost always way less than that. Also, a ketogenic diet isn't just low carb, it's also high-fat. If you can do at least 50% of calories from fat, that would help out any ketosis.
    On a personal note, I'd encourage you to not get too caught up focusing on the strips. I was like that for a long time and it frustrated me more than it helped (although it did help a bit).

  3. albertabeefy

    As a diabetic who controls my glucose with diet, I eat a ketogenic diet of 65-70% of my calories from fat, 25-30% from protein and a maximum 5% from carbohydrate. I will occasionally have more carbohydrate on days where I'm doing considerable exercise - such as a 100km bike ride, a 5 hour mountain hike, etc.
    I ONLY have more carbohydrate IF I'm burning it while exercising. IE: I'll eat it within 30-45 minutes prior to exercise.
    To GET ketogenic I did 2 weeks of 20-30g a day. That, combined with exercise, got me into ketosis in a few days, actually. I slowly added more carbohydrate into my diet - but found 5% on normal days was my threshold for good glycemic control. (On high-exercise days I can eat up to 10% with no issues.)
    The amount (in grams) of carb you have that keeps you in ketosis will obviously vary depending on your caloric intake.
    I normally eat up to 3,000 calories a day - as such 40g daily is about 5%. On a 5,000+ calorie day (not uncommon for me when doing endurance exercise) I may eat 120g or more...
    My daughter recently started a ketogenic diet for weight-loss. She doesn't really count calories, just eats reasonably, and keeps her carbohydrate intake about 20g a day. She lost 20lbs in the first 3 weeks.

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