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Invokana Ketoacidosis

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Ketoacidosis Not As Great As Thought In Diabetes Patients Taking Invokana

Home / Resources / Articles / Ketoacidosis Not as Great as Thought in Diabetes Patients Taking Invokana Ketoacidosis Not as Great as Thought in Diabetes Patients Taking Invokana Retrospective cases showed that some patients treated with canagliflozin had severe diabetes ketoacidosis The Food Drug Administration (FDA) had previously reported that Invokana (canagliflozin) had cases of diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) in type 2 diabetes; however, a recent study done by Janssen Research & Development shows that patients who were taking canagliflozin had lower events of DKA than previously reported. This study was performed in 17,596 patients to demonstrate the severity of diabetes ketoacidosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients using canagliflozin. In this trial, there were 12 cases (0.07%) of serious adverse events of DKA and related events were reported. The authors found 4 cases (0.07%) with an incidence rate of 0.522 in patients who were treated with canagliflozin 100 mg, 6 cases (0.11%) with an incidence rate of 0.763 in patients who were treated with canagliflozin 300 mg and 2 cases (0.03%) with an incidence rate of 0.238 of those on comparator; each incidence rate was per one thou Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. MariaMia816

    Can anyone tell me what an average weight loss per week or month is for 20 carbs a day? Im loosing soooooo slow.

  2. GSD_Mama

    I guess it will be different for everyone. My first two weeks I've lost about 10, of which water was probably 5-7lb. I'm going on my third month now and losing slow, sometimes I gain sometimes I lose, no rhyme or reason.

  3. stevieedge2015

    10lbs in a month. I'm trying to keep my calories to under 1500. I smoke like a chimney though so...aiming to get to 130 so I can quit and not worry about gaining 10lbs

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Sglt2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: Fda

SGLT2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: FDA The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned today that sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors used to treat type 2 diabetes may lead to ketoacidosis requiring hospitalization. The warning includes the SGLT2 inhibitors canagliflozin (Invokana, Johnson & Johnson), dapagliflozin (Farxiga, AstraZeneca), and empagliflozin (Jardiance, Lilly/Boehringer), as well as three combination products that include an SGLT2 inhibitor: canagliflozin plus metformin (Invokamet, Johnson & Johnson), dapagliflozin plus metformin extended release (Xigduo XR, AstraZeneca), and empagliflozin plus linagliptin (Glyxambi, Lilly/Boehringer). A search of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database identified 20 cases of acidosis reported as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), ketoacidosis, or ketosis in patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors from March 2013 to June 6, 2014, the FDA said . Ketoacidosis is not typically observed in patients with type 2 diabetes, the FDA notes, and the DKA case presentations were "atypical in that glucose levels were only mildly elevated at less than 200 mg/dL in some reports, while patients with type 1 diabete Continue reading >>

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  1. MathWiz

    I wasn’t sure which section I should post this in, my strategy is what I call the 4–2–1 plan, I fast 2 day non consecutive days a week, eat a low carb but not calorie restricted diet 4 days a week to keep the fat burning benefits of ketosis going and then I give myself 1 day a week to indulge and eat whatever I want, usually a Saturday pasta dinner and wonderful dessert. I also walk 4 to 6 miles a day during the week and 10 to 12 miles on Saturday.
    Low Carb plans such as Atkins can be very effective for some people including me, many people who start a low carb diet experience get what’s called the “ketosis flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose.
    The basic symptoms are:
    – Headaches
    – Nausea
    – Upset stomach
    – Lack of mental clarity (brain fog)
    – Sleepiness
    – Fatigue
    It’s called the “ketosis flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately it only lasted 2 days but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was really high and consistent throughout the day!
    The first time I thought to myself: “What the heck am I doing? I feel like I’m going to die!” but I persevered and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I had gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it.
    For those of you that are going through the ketosis flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up refreshed for the first time in years, not getting the afternoon “blah” feeling and stuffing my face with carbs to try to boost my energy is the best side effect of the low carb diet I’ve experienced. Okay, losing weight while eating good food, feeling full and satisfied is great too.
    First you have to understand why your body is reacting this way. Your body’s been burning glucose for energy so it’s basically full of enzymes that are waiting to deal with the carbs you eat, but now the body needs to make new enzymes that burn fat for fuel instead of carbs, and the transition period causes the flu-like symptoms.
    There are some things you can do to lessen the symptoms of the ketosis flu and to make it go away sooner (to force the body to transition sooner) Ok, let’s get to the good part – what to do:
    First of all – you’re probably dehydrated. Drink PLENTY of water while you’re on a low carb diet, and then drink some more.
    Watch your electrolytes. When the body is getting rid of excess insulin from your former carb-crazy diet you´ll lose lots of fluids that have been retained in your body. This causes the rapid weight loss most people see in their first few days of ketosis, it’s mostly water, sorry. When you lose all the retained water you also lose electrolytes like sodium, magnesium and potassium. When you’re lacking them you´ll feel like crap so when you’re feeling really ill on the ketosis flu try things like chicken/beef broth and look for foods rich in these minerals. Take a multi-vitamin and a multi-mineral.
    Ok, here is where people throw the red flag – Eat more fat – Yup, I said MORE fat. Have some butter, just not on a roll, eat some bacon and eggs for breakfast, just skip the potatoes and toast. This will force your body to hurry up the transition. You´ll think this is crazy and think you´ll never get lose weight eating this way, but you will.
    Don’t eat too much protein – The body can transform protein into glucose so if you eat too much of it in the first days it will slow down the transition. Go for fatty meat and cheese if you can, add fat to protein shakes etc.
    Drink water, replenish electrolytes (sodium, magnesium, potassium) with food and supplements, drink broth, eat fat and not too much protein.
    I hope this helps, and have a great day
    Charles

  2. rockyromero

    @mathwiz
    ” Take a multi-vitamin and a multi-mineral.”
    I have been forgetting to take a multi-vitamin on fast days. Thanks for the reminder.
    “Eat more fat – Yup, I said MORE fat. ”
    I will have avocado more often.

  3. AussieJess

    Thanks for that info, very interesting

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Invokana & Ketoacidosis: Fda Takes Action

Introduced to the US market in 2013, Janssen Pharmaceutical’s diabetes drug Invokana met with immediate fanfare. The Johnson & Johnson subsidiary hailed its new product as an “important [and] much-needed” development in the fight against type 2 diabetes. Forbes acclaimed the drug’s “market potential,” while highlighting Invokana’s ability to “attack blood sugar right from the get go.” The US Food & Drug Administration heralded Invokana as an “advance [in] innovation.” Invokana’s market potential was quickly realized, with an estimated 2 million prescriptions written in 2014 alone. But soon after, the FDA would make a troubling announcement: Invokana had been linked to a major health risk. Does Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis? According to an FDA Safety Announcement released on May 15, 2015, Invokana and a number of drugs like it “may lead to ketoacidosis, a serious condition where the body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones that may require hospitalization.” Less than a year later, the agency would turn to concrete action, adding a new warning to Invokana’s label. This major revision instructed physicians to immediately discontinue the drug Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. borick

    https://gokaleo.com/2013/06/13/restriction-and-menstrual-function/
    Thoughts?

  2. Pathwag

    Keto has, I believe, fixed my menstrual cycle. I had gone about 4 months without a period, a month on keto and I got a period. I'm waiting for the next few months to confirm the theory, but right now, I really wouldn't worry about it.

  3. lecirca

    Mine is actually normal now. Female athletes don't lose their periods because of starvation - its due to low body fat and advanced exercise regimens. Starvation IS another reason, but most female athletes aren't starving.

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