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Intermittent Fasting Keto Reddit

Hunger

Hunger

Because this has to be said, my shower-thought of the day: I see a lot of people complaining about “hunger” when dieting – “I’m doing a ketogenic diet… why am I hungry? – I read I should not feel hunger on a ketogenic diet”… Well, let me tell you: Hunger is not necessarily a bad thing. Guys & Gals: have we become so “cognitive dissonant” and complacent, that we have forgotten that hunger is, in a way, a natural part of the process of any diet that the main focus is fat loss??? Any diet, be it keto or high carb, will eventually make you feel hungry. Yes, there are “ways” to trick your body and get “distracted” from the hunger signals, but being hungry is NORMAL, NATURAL and most of all, EXPECTED. There is nothing wrong with you if you experience hunger on keto…. and if you are eating as per the Ketogains macros (from our Ketogains MACRO calculator) – you are likely going to do well. “Eating more fat” just because you are “hungry” (and because someone told you you should be eating more fat) – UTTERLY defeats the purpose of a fat loss diet (and of course, #context dependent)…. because to lose body fat, you DO require an energy deficit. What can you do if you are hungry then? 1. Correct Macros. Check your macros are correctly calculated using OUR calculator. 2. Whole Food. Put an emphasis on WHOLE, nutrient dense foods, especially PROTEIN. Shakes are ok, for example, as a way to reach macros… but if you find yourself constantly hungry, you are better off eating chicken breast / beef, etc vs liquid calories. 3. Green Vegetables. Really: do you actually know you can eat almost a kilo of spinach a day, without disrupting keto? Go and look at the NET Carbs: 4. Soups. Try to increase food volume with liquids. My personal recipe for Continue reading >>

Perfect Cup Of Ketoproof Coffee

Perfect Cup Of Ketoproof Coffee

Ketoproof coffee is quite a bit healthier than your average breakfast, and it has the calories to match. Commonly used in intermittent fasting, ketoproof coffee gives plenty of energy and a great satiated feeling throughout the morning fasting hours. Now, I want to explain this further. Drinking this coffee will break your fast from the night time, but it will ramp up your metabolism with caffeine and fats. This is to help you get through the fasting process in the 10+ hours ahead. Personally, I drink 2 cups of this in the morning – fast all day – and eat at 9pm. If you’re only using this for breakfast, and still eating a lunch, then it’s not really intermittent fasting. Our favorite brew is made with a pour over and goose-neck kettle. I chose the Bonavita Variable Temp Kettle because it’s on the cheaper side for the quality that you can get. If you’re a coffee lover, it’s definitely worth the splurge! For the pour over, we have an Osaka “Lake Masu” Pour over. It’s really just for the design – I think it looks fantastic. You can easily get a cheap one here that’ll do the same exact thing though. Don’t forget that you’ll most likely need some coffee filters, too. If you’re not a morning person and just want a quick and easy cup of coffee, you can always consider a Keurig Coffee Maker. I’ve owned numerous in the past and they’re great machines if you want convenience. It doesn’t take up much more room than a regular coffee maker and you can usually get small drawers or stands that will hold the k-cups for you. Plus, you can switch up the flavors with just about any type you want! Even though k-cups have come a long way on consumer safety and ecological factors, you still might want to grind your own fresh coffee. Luckily, you can grab a Continue reading >>

Running On Empty

Running On Empty

Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression. In 1971, a 27-year-old, 456-pound man went to the University of Dundee’s department of medicine in Scotland looking for help. Patient A.B., as doctors referred to him, needed to lose weight. His physicians recommended a short but drastic course of action: stop eating altogether. The patient responded so well to a brief stint without food that he decided to prolong the deprivation—for more than a year. “[H]is fast was continued into what is presently the longest recorded fast (Guinness Book of Records, 1971),” the clinicians wrote in a 1973 case report, claiming A.B. suffered little or no untoward effects on his health.1 And at the end of his 382-day dietary abstinence, during which he had ingested only vitamin supplements, yeast, and noncaloric fluids, A.B. had lost a remarkable 276 pounds. When doctors checked back in on A.B. five years later, their patient reported gaining back only about 15 pounds. Although aspects of this published report seem almost unbelievable, and the period of fasting is obviously extreme, the case highlights some of the metabolic dynamics that result when bodies are deprived of food. For example, when external calories stop fueling an animal’s metabolism, stores of triglycerides in fat cells are mobilized, and levels of ketones—chemicals that result from the burning of fat for fuel—rise. Decreases in body weight follow. Scientists are further detailing both the underlying metabolic dynamics and interesting physiological phenomena aside from weight loss as they study less-extreme permutations of fasting in animal models and Continue reading >>

The Pro’s And Con’s Of Intermittent Fasting

The Pro’s And Con’s Of Intermittent Fasting

Is intermittent fasting right for you? Find out HERE! If you’ve been reading my blog for the past 18 months, then you know that I’ve been practicing Intermittent Fasting! What is intermittent fasting? If you’re wondering what I mean by Intermittent Fasting (IF,) then let me explain. IF simply means that you choose to fast during a certain time period each day, and you also choose to eat your calories within a certain time period each day. The most popular time period is 16:8, so for 16 hours, I don’t eat anything, then for 8 hours, I eat my regular amount of calories. If you would like to learn more about my experience with IF and why I do it, please watch my video. Since deciding to live a lifestyle that incorporates IF, I’ve had many of my customers also try it! Some have had great success and love it, while others have tried it and hated it. So today, I wanted to let you in on some of the benefits of intermittent fasting as well as some of the reasons why it may not be right for YOU! Some Evidence-Based Health Benefits of Intermittent Fasting (please see this article that links to the studies and also touches on more benefits) #1 Intermittent Fasting Changes the Function of Cells, Genes, and Hormones: When you don’t eat for a while, several things happen to your body… Insulin levels drop which helps stimulate fat-burning. Human Growth Hormone increases which also stimulates fat-burning and muscle building. The body induces several cellular repair processes, such as removing waste from cells. There are beneficial changes in several genes and molecules related to longevity and protection against disease. #2 IF Can Help You Lose Weight and Belly Fat: Lower insulin levels, higher growth hormone levels and increased amounts of norepinephrine (noradrenaline) Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting On A Keto Diet

Intermittent Fasting On A Keto Diet

Intermittent Fasting, or “IF”, is a relatively new craze that is used as a supplement to your diet. It revolves around the timing of your food intake, and can have some benefits in the long run. There are quite a few people misinformed on fasting, so we’ll clear that up and explain how intermittent fasting can be useful. On your ketogenic journey, it’s important to know that your success is not only dictated by eating enough fat and protein and restricting carbs. When you eat, how often you eat, and how much you eat have a substantial impact on your health and function as well. If your results have plateaued or you are thinking of starting a ketogenic diet, this article will provide you with a way to lose more fat and improve energy levels called intermittent fasting. If you need to learn how to calculate your macros, visit our Keto Calculator. Fasting isn’t required to lose weight on a ketogenic diet. If it doesn’t work for you, then do not force yourself to fast. Restricting yourself unrealistically is pointless – it’s not worth it if it makes you unhappy. There are 2 basic terms we need to understand here first: feeding and fasting. Your body is in a feeding state when you are eating your food, and you are in a fasting state when you are between your meals. The Approach Skipped meals. This is when you skip over a meal to induce extra time of fasting. Usually people choose breakfast, but others prefer to skip lunch. Eating windows. Usually this condenses your entire macronutrient intake between a 4 and 7 hour window. The rest of the time you are in a fasting state. 24-48 hour cleanse. This is where you go into extended fasting periods, and do not eat for 1-2 days. I don’t recommend that you go straight for a 1-2 day fast, but begin by restricting you Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting & Ketogenic Diet – The Science & Benefits Of Fasted Weight Loss In Ketosis

Intermittent Fasting & Ketogenic Diet – The Science & Benefits Of Fasted Weight Loss In Ketosis

There are claims that intermittent fasting not only aids weight loss but also improves brain health, cognitive function and even as a life extension tool. Fasting, of course, is not a new thing it has been around for centuries used by athletes, various religions and lifestyle gurus. There has been a lot of research and study into intermittent fasting science that suggests it has many applications in medicine. What is Intermittent Fasting Intermittent Fasting (commonly known as “IF”) is not dieting rather it is how you plan your diet or schedule when you eat. To fast means not to eat and diet is what you eat. Usually, you’ll find that most people begin their fast at bedtime, skip breakfast and not have lunch or anything to eat until early afternoon. Most people who plan their diet with an intermittent fast are doing so for weight loss as IF ramps up the bodies fat burning ability, particularly if your body is already in ketosis. Intermittent Fasting for Weight Loss & Fat Burning Intermittent fasting has the effect of prolonging the bodies postabsorptive state and limiting the absorptive state. By doing so increases the length of time the body uses its own energy reserves. What do absorptive and postabsorptive states mean? The absorptive state of your digestive system is the time in which your body spends absorbing food after you have eaten also called fed state. The postabsorptive state is the time in which your digestive system is empty in a fasted state and it is relying on the energy that your body has stored for such times. Most people, depending on what they eat are in a fed state for 3-4 hours after their last meal, some people only ever get out of being in a fed state when they’re sleeping. How does intermittent fasting help you lose fat? People who interm Continue reading >>

My Keto Diet Has Killed My Appetite And Hunger Dead

My Keto Diet Has Killed My Appetite And Hunger Dead

I have been eating according to the keto diet for eight days, according to /r/keto on reddit. After a little more than a week, my appetite has really been suppressed and it’s taken a lot less keto-friendly food to sate my hunger. I’m not at all like by buddy Mark Harrison who needs to be reminded to eat at all every couple days when he starts to get headaches and become irritable. All his friends know the panacea to his distress is food: “Mark, have you tried eating today?” No, I’m the antithesis of guys like that. Me, more like: feed me Seymour! It’s really weird. Not only that but with just ~530 calories in once meal with 75% fat, 20% protein, and 5% carbs, I’ve started feeling over-stuffed, like that feeling you get after a real Thanksgiving stuffing. It’s real. I have also heard things like, “man, I was so sick and tired of stuffing down sausage and bacon” from people back in the day on Atkins. And I’m not the only one. “What works for me may not work for you, but what I did was not worry about calories until I hit Ketosis,” Mrdirtyvegas shared with me, “Once I hit Ketosis I’m able to eat 1600kcal a day and not feel hungry between breakfast, lunch and dinner. Previously if I only ate 1600kcal a day, I would feel like I was starving. I was putting back about 2500-3000kcal before keto.” Testify! Maybe the keto diet is the food/nutrition version of making the bad teen you caught smoking cigarettes smoke the whole pack, the entire carton: that’ll show you, piggy! Now I understand why a ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting (IF) go hand-in-hand. I have a fridge filled with bacon and spinach and slow-cooked beef and mayo and blue cheese dressing and cheddar cheese and even alfredo sauce and dozens of organic eggs and it kind of makes me Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Intermittent Fasting

Ketosis Vs. Intermittent Fasting

Ketosis and intermittent fasting are topics that often fall into the same types of conversations. That being said, they do have differences that can lead you to wonder if one’s better than the other or how both can fit into your life. We can help you there! We’ll be comparing ketosis vs. intermittent fasting — starting with a summary of each, then seeing what they have in common and how they differ. What is Ketosis? In short, ketosis is the process where the body burns ketone bodies for energy. With a regular type, the body’s primary source of energy is glucose, which comes from eating carbohydrates like bread, sugars, grains, fruit, or beans and legumes. The carbohydrates from these foods are either used as glucose by the body immediately or stored as glycogen to be used later. However, if the body has a low supply of glucose, it must turn to something else for fuel. In the case of ketosis, that’s fat. A ketogenic diet, which is high-fat, moderate-protein, and very-low-carb, will cause the body to break down fat instead of carbs for energy. When this happens, the follow ketone bodies are formed: Acetoacetate: Created first and then either converted into beta-hydroxybutyrate or turned into acetone. Acetone: Created spontaneously from the breakdown of acetoacetate. It’s the most volatile ketone and is often detectable on the breath when someone first goes into ketosis. Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB): The ketone most often measured in blood tests and found in exogenous ketones like Perfect Keto. There are many benefits of putting the body into a state of ketosis, the most popular being weight loss, which we’ll examine first. Ketosis Weight Loss Benefits Ketosis helps weight/fat loss for the following reasons: Other health benefits of ketosis include: Studies sho Continue reading >>

Combining Intermittent Fasting And Ketosis

Combining Intermittent Fasting And Ketosis

One of the most frequently asked questions I get – after how can I do so many things in a single day – has to do with combining intermittent fasting and ketosis. Can you do it and whether or not it’s any good? Read this article and you’ll find out. When it comes to nutrition, then the majority of people are on a quest towards finding that one diet or secret hack that would allow them to get everything their hearts desire – delicious meals, bulletproof health, excellent body composition, abundant energy, elevated mood and greater satiety. In order to get them all, you would think you have to sell your soul to the devil. Which brings me to the nutritional strategies of intermittent fasting (IF) and the ketogenic diet (KETO). Both of them have gained a lot of rep in the health and fitness community – some of it is very good, some not so much. IF and keto contradict almost everything that’s recommended by the general public in regards to nutrition. Despite that, there are millions of people getting amazing results from it. However, there are others who can’t seem to make it work. After having coached many clients on how to combine intermittent fasting and low carb eating, I came to the conclusion that it’s indeed a very challenging and difficult ‘nutritionus[i]. The reason why most people fail is that they don’t have the slightest clue of what they’re doing. To mitigate that, I’m going to explain to you how it all works. In a society full of calories, ‘fasting’ has become the F-word that’s associated with images of starvation, obesity, anorexia, asceticism, and horror all at the same time. This is the result of contemporary eating habits based on snacking, refined carbohydrates and low fat bacon (yummm!). What intermittent fasting really refe Continue reading >>

How To Lose Stubborn Belly Fat Through Ketosis

How To Lose Stubborn Belly Fat Through Ketosis

Losing stubborn belly fat is one of the biggest challenges when getting in shape. Belly fat is not only aesthetically unappealing, it has health consequences. It can make you vulnerable to many conditions such as diabetes and heart problems. In this blog, we will share with you why belly fat is so ‘stubborn’ to burn, explain what exactly is Ketosis and how you can lose stubborn belly fat through Ketosis. We will also share a specific exercise and a diet plan to help burn this belly fat. What is Stubborn Belly fat and why it is bad for our health? While you may have fat all over different parts of your body, it isn’t the same. Stubborn belly fat is the soft layers of fat around the waistline that covers your abs. To be more precise, there are three types of fat: Triglycerides– A fat circulates in your blood Subcutaneous Fat– The layer of fat directly below the skin’s surface. This is the fat you can grab with your hands Visceral Fat– The dangerous fat. This is located beneath the muscles in your stomach Belly fat unfortunately does not just sit still. Some visceral fat is necessary, but too much can lead to health problems. You can estimate whether you are carrying too much belly fat by measuring your waist with tape. Anything over 80 cm (31.5 inches) in women and 94 cm (37 inches) can provoke health issues. Carrying excess visceral fat is associated with an increased risk for: Coronary heart disease Cancer Stroke Dementia Diabetes Depression Arthritis Obesity Sexual dysfunction Sleep disorders Why is Stubborn belly fat so “Stubborn”? To understand what makes belly fat so difficult to burn,let’s dive into the biology. Burning fat is a two-part process: Lipolysis is the process whereby fat cells release molecules of stored fat into the blood. Oxidation Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

Share What is Intermittent Fasting? Intermittent fasting is not a diet, it’s a pattern of eating. It’s a way of scheduling your meals so that you get the most out of them. It does not say anything about which foods you should eat, but rather when you should eat them. It is simply the practice of going an extended period of time taking in zero calories—basically drinking only plain water and either black coffee or tea. Many variations of IF exist, but the most preferred method which is nothing but the Leangains Protocol—involves fasting for 16 hours(men) and 14 hours(women), then eating all of the food during an eight-hour window commonly called the “feeding window.” Frequently Asked Questions: To help you decide, Let’s go over some answers to some common questions about IF and some useful tips so you can get the most out of the program. Q. What sets IF apart from other dieting methods? IF offers something very unique, in terms of enjoying physically and psychologically satisfying meals while losing weight. The absence of hunger and cravings are also a welcome feature when using IF for weight loss. Contrary to popular belief, the fasting phase has a suppressive effect on hunger. Hunger pangs may come, but they disappear quickly, only to be replaced by a sense of well being and total absence of hunger. Q. Are there any benefits in following IF? Research has shown that fasting for relatively long periods may result in greater fat burning, even when total daily calorie intake remains the same. Most people find that they’re able to have a few more of their favorite “cheat” foods during the feeding window and still see results. This is why IF is such an appealing diet for many people. Other reasons why so many individuals love IF are that’s it’s relati Continue reading >>

Bulletproof Diet And Intermittent Fasting – My 30-day Results

Bulletproof Diet And Intermittent Fasting – My 30-day Results

Approximately 3 months ago, I decided to try out the “Bulletproof” diet and document my experience adapting to a high (healthy) fat, low carb diet. For those of you who haven’t read my previous post, basically the Bulletproof Diet could be called an “upgraded” Paleo diet. The premise is simple – eat a high (healthy!)-fat, low carb diet, getting 50-60% of calories from healthy fats, 20% from protein, and the rest from vegetables. A major difference between Bulletproof and Paleo is the attempt to minimize toxins from the diet which are thought to play a major factor in inflammation. Before beginning, I scheduled a blood panel through InsideTracker, to establish my baseline “before” biomarkers. It had been 5 months since my previous round of bloodwork, during which time I attempted to correct several problematic areas and reset my metabolism by stopping going to the gym 2 months prior and supplementing calcium and vitamin D (my elevated Creatine kinase level was an indication I was overtraining!). My “before” blood results showed that while I had gotten my creatine kinase and vitamin D levels back in the “optimal zone” and added over 200 points to what was an extremely low (but was still low) testosterone level (due to, I believe, previous overtraining plus stress plus eating a very low-fat diet), there were still several biomarkers that weren’t optimal (extremely low white blood cell count, slightly elevated LDL, slightly low HDL, low hemoglobin, not “optimal” testosterone) and I was hoping the Bulletproof diet could impact. Continue reading >>

I Went On The Silicon Valley Diet Craze That Encourages Butter And Bacon For 2 Months — And It Vastly Improved My Life

I Went On The Silicon Valley Diet Craze That Encourages Butter And Bacon For 2 Months — And It Vastly Improved My Life

Bacon became my new best friend on the ketogenic diet.Business Insider A diet that goes against conventional wisdom on healthy eating is gaining momentum among Silicon Valley tech workers. And it involves eating a lot of fat. The ketogenic, or "keto," diet — which first became popular in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy and diabetes — limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day, which is the rough equivalent of a plain bagel or a cup of white rice. By comparison, dietary guidelines laid out by the US Department of Agriculture recommend consuming between 225 and 325 grams of carbs a day. On the keto diet, the body goes into starvation mode and taps its fat stores for fuel. Studies suggest the low-carb, high-fat diet may promote weight loss, dull hunger, and stave off age-related diseases. More research is needed on its long-term effects, especially in healthy people. An increasing number of health nuts — from the internet entrepreneur Kevin Rose to the podcaster Tim Ferriss — swear by the keto diet. I spent the past two months eating bacon, butter, and avocados to see why the keto movement is so popular. I am no stranger to diets. I've cut sugar, counted points on Weight Watchers, and swapped solid food for Soylent, a venture-capital-backed meal-replacement shake. Here's me eating a doughnut.Melia Robinson/Business Insider I gave up breakfast for a week and drank this caffeinated meal-replacement shake instead » But those usually don't last long. I love food. I'm a chronic snacker. Melia Robinson/Business Insider When I first learned about the keto diet, it caught my interest because dieters could eat seemingly unlimited amounts of healthy fats, like cheese, nuts, avocado, eggs, butter — foods that have high "point values" on Weight Watchers and a Continue reading >>

The Best Diet Plan… [ketogenic? Intermittent Fasting? Carb Cycling?]

The Best Diet Plan… [ketogenic? Intermittent Fasting? Carb Cycling?]

“So what is the best diet?” A question I’ve heard many times and if you ever ask good coach this, then you’ll hear the ever so frustrating answer -> “Well… It depends” And as frustrating as that may be to us, because it doesn’t give us an answer or actionable step to take, it’s the truth. Because every one is different from each aspect of their lives, schedules, hormones, goals, energy demands, and so much more. But many times in media or when asking other people or coaches who have experienced success with a specific diet plan, they will tell you that “_________” is the best diet. Whether it was a low-carb plan, carb cycling, ketogenic, paleo, intermittent fasting, or a 40/30/30 macro split… That one diet seems to be the answer. Unfortunately it isn’t that easy and the answer is never black and white. So, lets look to studies for the answers because I am a fitness and nutrition geek and that’s where I turn too for the real answers. ‘Sacks et al. “Comparison of Weight-Loss Diets with Different Compositions for Fat, Protein and Carbohydrates” N Engl J Med 2009; 360:859-873February 26, 2009DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa0804748’ The study above assigned 811 overweight adults to diets that all varied the amounts of protein, carbohydrates and fat but contained roughly the same amount of calories. They then followed them for 2 full years. Even though dietary intake was self-reported, the participants were far from left alone with the aspect of how the were tracking their diets. They were all part of a specific group and were also given 1 on 1 support via instructional sessions for the entire duration of the trial, so the tracking was definitely on point during the study. At the end of the study, the weight loss was about completely even for all 4 grou Continue reading >>

6 Things That Can Break A Stall

6 Things That Can Break A Stall

If you’ve ever tried to lose a significant amount of body fat, you’ve likely experienced a stall or a plateau. For the sake of this articles, I’m going to use the term “stall” to mean nothing to do with the scale, because scales are for suckers (and they’re horrible measure of any sort of success…ditch the scale). Instead, when I’m talking about a stall, I’m talking about a period of time when your clothes are not getting looser. Pants, shirts, heck, even shoes. As you lose body fat, the stuff you put on your outside should fit differently. But sometimes your clothes don’t cooperate. Sometimes you go through periods where your clothes fit just as tight as before. That, my friend, is a stall. And it’s frustrating. Of course, a lot of the frustration has to do with the expectations you place upon yourself and your progress (that’s a whole separate article), but suffice it to say that the frustration is real. So what can you do to overcome or break a stall? In general, here’s a list of possible things. Cut out dairy A lot of people have trouble digesting dairy. The kicker is, many of them don’t even know that they have the problem. But, whether you have a dairy issue or not, eliminating dairy is a simple and easy way to break a stall. Lots of people say they could never give up cheese, but the reality of the situation is: If giving up cheese (even temporarily) is a way to get back on track to achieving your goals, then the cheese has to go. No excuses. Not negotiable. Sure, cheese and cream are great, fatty, keto-friendly foods, but they are not more important than your goals. So try cutting out dairy for a few weeks and see how your clothes start to fit differently. Cut out nuts Lots of nuts are very high in fat (I’m looking at you…you gorg Continue reading >>

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