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Intermittent Fasting Keto Bodybuilding

My Experiences With Extended Fasting

My Experiences With Extended Fasting

In this blog I intend to share my experiences with prolonged (over 24 hour) fasts. If you are new to fasting, or simply want to know WHY I would consider going for extended periods without food be sure to read my article Fasting: How Skipping Meals Can Burn Fat & Increase Lifespan. Also, make sure you sign up to my email newsletter, as I will be updating this blog each time I do a new fast (eventually I would like to do a 7 day or longer fast…) I have been using IF for over 5 years now, it was a key protocol in my bodybuilding success whereby I did daily 16 hour fasts. As you can see below, fasting definitely helped me drop the excess body fat! But my point here is that I had plenty of experiencing with regular intermittent fasting of around 12-16 hours. here However, it was only in early 2016 that I did my first 24 hours fast. To be honest, the first time I did this it felt like an eternity. I went lunch to lunch, and it was hard. I truly believe a lot of the difficulty is behavioral however. I was in a ketogenic state going into the fast, having been low carb for a few months prior, so from a physiological point of view my body should have been well equipped to go a day without food. Anyway, I didn’t die and I started introducing 24 hour fasts into my diet on a weekly basis. Soon I was doing 30 hours without any issues. This led me to my next challenge… a 3 day 72 hour fast. It has been shown that after 2 days of fasting immune function is boosted, so I figured that would be a great target for my first prolonged fast. 72 Hours Without Food My last – prefast - meal was a big Sunday night roast at 7pm on July 24th 2016. The next day I felt fine, but I did feel a tad flat – I think it was more the fact knowing that I would be depriving myself of life’s simple Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The Keto Diet With Sample Meal Plan

Ultimate Guide To The Keto Diet With Sample Meal Plan

1. Introduction to ketogenic dieting 2. What exactly is ketosis? 3. The 3 main types of keto diets 3.1. Standard keto dieting 3.2. Cyclical keto dieting 3.2. Targeted keto dieting 4. Which keto variation should I use? 5. Setting up your own keto diet 6. Food selection on keto diets 7. Alterations for cyclical keto dieting 8. Alterations for targeted keto dieting 9. Fine tuning TKD and CKD 10. Saturated fat intake on keto diets—considerations 11. Selected recipes for keto dieting 12. Frequently asked questions Intro to ketogenic dieting Ketogenic (herein referred to as “keto”) dieting has been around for decades and garnered a somewhat strong following in bodybuilding subculture. In a nutshell, keto diets are simply diets that are high in fat and protein and very low in carbohydrate (usually <10% total macronutrient intake); given this the body is diverted to utilize fats for energy since glucose stores become depleted. Keto diets can be effective for many individuals and tailored to suit their goals, whether it’s to build muscle, lose fat, develop strength, etc. While keto diets are often used mainly for health and fitness purposes, they are also implemented in medicine as treatment for epilepsy. [1] You may be asking, “What makes a keto diet different from any other low-carb diet?” The truth is not much, other than that some people believe keto diets are only effective when the body enters a state called ketosis and starts to produce ketones for energy (hence the name “ketogenic”), which requires extreme carbohydrate restriction. However, this supposition is shortsighted and will be touched on later in this guide. In this guide we will take an in-depth look at the physiology behind keto dieting, the different types/variations of keto diets there are, ho Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Diet For Bodybuilding And Weight Loss

Intermittent Fasting Diet For Bodybuilding And Weight Loss

The intermittent fasting approach to diet may go against everything you’ve heard about food, metabolism and muscle. But the research (not to mention the experience of many practitioners—including yours truly) has led me to believe this is one of the most effective dietary strategies you can utilize. You may have grown up reading about the importance of small, frequent meals for “firing up your metabolism.” This was the bodybuilding dogma for decades and I also used to believe it. But research has not demonstrated any metabolic difference in small, frequent meals versus large infrequent eating. One study, for example, compared the metabolic affect of two meals a day with eating seven meals a day in thirteen subjects. Researchers concluded there were “no consequences for the total 24 h energy expenditure (24 h EE) of the two feeding patterns.”1 Having said this, I’ll tell you two distinct advantages to an intermittent fasting approach to diet: 1. Simplicity/Compliance Small, frequent meals are fine if this way of eating helps you consistently hit your daily caloric goals. But eating 6-7 times a day may not be practical for those of us who don’t make a living in the fitness profession. I’ve also found low carbohydrate approaches to be very effective. But compliance is also an issue here—going several days without carbs is just kind of a pain in the rear end (memories of “keto breath” come to mind). This is the beauty of intermittent fasting. It does take some getting used to, but you don’t have to stress over eating every few hours or completely abstaining from one type of food. This is important, because long-term compliance will be the most important factor in whether or not a diet “works.” For me the adjustment to the diet kind of works in Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Strength Training?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Strength Training?

If you haven’t seen it thrown around Reddit, you might have heard it ballyhooed by a gym bro: ketosis just works, bro! You get to eat all the bacon and cream you can stomach, shred fat, maintain muscle, and still dominate your sport. The very, very high-fat ketogenic diet is one of the hottest trends in nutrition, but while there are some success stories in endurance athletes, there’s very little evidence in strength sports. It may be delicious, but is it a smart pick for your next meet? What Are We Talking About, Exactly? Your body kicks into ketosis when carbohydrate intake is so low that the body doesn’t want to use it as a fuel source. Typically, that happens when fat makes up 60 to 70 percent of overall calories, protein 20 to 30 percent, and carbs are under 50 grams per day. It usually takes less than a day for your body to start producing ketones for fuel — a sure sign is when when your breath starts to smell of acetone, a ketosis by-product. (Incidentally, it kind of stinks. Like a mixture of fruit and nail polish remover, in which acetone is a key ingredient.) “If you look at one of the main fuels the body can burn, carbohydrates and fat are the main two, and a layer down are the sort of ‘subfuels,’ lactate and ketones,” says Dr. Mike T. Nelson, CSCS, an adjunct professor at the Carrick Institute whose PhD focused on metabolic flexibility. “Historically, ketones have not shown up in the body in enough quantities for the body to use unless you’re in starvation,” he explains. “But you can get there via what’s called a ketogenic diet. When you do that, your body will start producing ketones, which can then be used for fuel. Then you’re in a state of ketosis.” Though first suggested as a therapeutic tool by the Mayo Clinic in the 1920s Continue reading >>

Interview With The King Of Aesthetics – Frank Zane

Interview With The King Of Aesthetics – Frank Zane

As I drove up a long, winding hill in beautiful La Mesa, California, I couldn’t help but be a bit nervous. I was about to interview and train with one of my idols, Frank Zane. Zane and Arnold were the two physiques that first got me interested in lifting weights. It seems like just yesterday that I was a skinny high school kid ripping pictures of them out of Muscle and Fitness and taping it on my wall. Now, I’d be interviewing one of bodybuilding’s legends for that same magazine. The entire experience was surreal. I’m an avid fan of the “Golden Era” of bodybuilding. I have all the old books from those guys like 3 More Reps and the Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding. I am far more interested in learning how they developed their physiques with such limited resources than the guys of today. Bodybuilding has taken a real turn for the worse. Symmetry and aesthetics are a lost art. Today, it’s all about freakish mass and who can survive the largest drug cocktail. The sport is dead in my opinion (and I use the word “sport” loosely). Frank Zane was able to build arguably the most proportionate, muscular and aesthetically pleasing physique of all time. Because of this, I was really eager to learn as much as I could about his nutrition, training and supplementation. Come to find out, we share a lot of the same beliefs and his knowledge was far ahead of his time. The first half of our interview will be in Muscle and Fitness in the fall. The following interview features a lot of his training tips as well as discussion between the two of us. Competing Back Then vs. Now Frank Zane first started lifting weights around 14. He did this because he lived in a dangerous neighborhood with a lot of fighting and wanted to build his body up. The first organization he competed in wa Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Bodybuilding On The Ketogenic Diet

A Comprehensive Guide To Bodybuilding On The Ketogenic Diet

A common belief among bodybuilders is that carbohydrates are essential for building the best physiques. However, carbohydrates have little to do with the success of many bodybuilders. The key to improving body composition is not through little intricacies like eating the right amount of carbs at the right times. The best bodies are built by implementing five simple principles, whether you are on the ketogenic diet or not. The Five Most Important Bodybuilding Principles The bodybuilding world is filled with radical concepts, silly supplements, and plenty of bro science, but these things — regardless of how hotly debated they are — may only provide you with a 1 to 2% boost in results. What you are really looking for is the tried and true bodybuilding principles that are backed by decades of science. The best results come from following the simple principles that will give you 80% of the results for the price of some hard work and discipline, not that $50 supplement that only leads to a 1% boost in performance. Here are the five principles every bodybuilder must follow: Train hard enough. You must give your muscles a stimulus to grow. Eat enough protein. You must give your muscles the building blocks they need to grow and your body the energy it needs to function. Eat the right amount of calories. Whether you want to cut body fat or increase muscle mass, it is important to eat the right amount of calories. On the ketogenic diet, you will manipulate your calorie consumption by eating more or less fat. Take care of your hormones. Resistance training, adequate nutrition, essential fatty acids and proper sleep should be your primary focus to increase your testosterone and HGH. Too much stress will put your body into a catabolic state that breaks down muscle for energy. Dri Continue reading >>

Going Keto Pt. 2: Preparing For Ketosis

Going Keto Pt. 2: Preparing For Ketosis

Sponsored Content Last month we covered the wide range of fascinating benefits one can expect to see while on a ketogenic diet. The same dietary regimen that can fight all sorts of diseases and metabolic ailments can increase satiety while keeping you so unbelievably cut that people will be offering you band-aids all day. These enticing benefits could have you chomping at the bit to start right here and now, but before taking one bite be sure you're fully prepared if you hope to reap peak results from going keto. #1: IDENTIFY YOUR GOALS It's critical that you've written down clear, measurable goals before embarking on this new lifestyle (trust us, it’s more than just a diet). Depending on whether you're looking to build muscle, stay shredded, improve blood markers, or starve (and potentially prevent) cancer, the type of keto diet you follow will reflect that significantly. A ketogenic diet is technically any diet that causes the body to produce ketone bodies, so watch your macros closely, but get creative when you can. Keto diets will vary from one person’s goals to another… not unlike the wide range of meal plans you'll find in the IIFYM crowd. If you didn’t read Going Keto Pt. 1, go back and read that HERE. A few key things to remember before going forward: for those of you doing keto, it's best to err on the side of higher protein. Excess protein increases the likelihood of ‘gluconeogenesis’ though, which is when the body converts protein into glucose. If this happens, your body won't produce as many ketone bodies (if at all). On the flip side, a 4:1 ketogenic diet is not one you want to remain on indefinitely, either, due to such low protein intake. Commit to a higher fat ratio for a relatively short period of time (one month is great) to maximize endoge Continue reading >>

Chaz Branham: Ketosis, Carb Backloading, And Bodybuilding

Chaz Branham: Ketosis, Carb Backloading, And Bodybuilding

Can You Compete In a Bodybuilding Competition Using Ketosis and Carb Backloading? Chaz is a man-beast, a freak of nature in all the best ways. This is a guy who entered the Texas Shredder Classic, his first bodybuilding competition, on a dare– and did ridiculously well by using a fat-based approach. He’s my good friend, a venture capitalist, a trainer, and the first person I thought of to answer your questions about burning fat fast, ketosis, and carb backloading. Before we get to the podcast, our Review of the Week comes from Amanda, who listens to the podcast and switched to a Wild diet with wild results! Amanda and her husband have never felt better in their lives—and he even got rid of his migraines. She also loves the idea of burning fat without gut-busting cardio workouts… and she shouts out to me and all the people behind the scenes. I do, too! So, my sincerest thanks to Alyson, Bailey (our mascot), Tyler, Peter, and Melinda! You guys rock. And thanks to all the listeners out there—keep the comments and reviews coming, I read every one. Also, please remember that we keep this podcast commercial free so that I don’t have to promote a bunch of junk on the show—but you can support the team and keep up the flow of unbiased information by grabbing a copy of The Wild Diet at www.wilddietbook.com. There are some really great bonuses available when you pre-order so check them out and get your copy today. Chaz Branham has coached some of the world’s greatest athletes, executives, and early stage entrepreneurs. He started his fitness career by helping college and professional athletes fine-tune during the off season and now he’s a venture capitalist investing in startups in Austin, TX. He also advises Fixed Foods, an explosive subscription-based paleo mea Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting While In Ketosis As Beneficial?

Intermittent Fasting While In Ketosis As Beneficial?

I am about 3 weeks into a ketogenic diet, following the framework outlined by Volek and Phinney in their books. They recommend that protein is a set amount based on your height and ideal body weight. For me this is around 90g per day minimum. Carb intake is minimized, and for me its less than 20g net carbs (Atkins calculation) per day. Based on this approach, the rest of my energy needs come from fat. If I am active, I eat more fat. The protein and carbs remain consistent as total amounts, not % based. I have been monitoring blood ketones twice daily and have been in the recommended range for some time now. I may not be fully keto-adapted yet (as they say it can take 4-6 weeks), but I am definitely generating enough ketones to provide adequate fuel for my brain and other organs once my body does largely adapt. On the 'Ask the Low Carb Experts' podcast a few months ago, Jimmy Moore had Dr. Phinney on the show. It was a long show with a ton of great info, but there was one thing that Phinney said that didn't make sense to me and he didn't really explain. What he said was that fasting is a bad idea because one will lose lean mass when not eating for an extended period of time. He said skipping lunch might be OK, but he wouldn't recommend going longer than that. There was no real further explanation or discussion on the topic. Since the context of this show was ketogenic diets, I am under the impression he was speaking of fasting while in ketosis. Alas, I could not tell if his statement was general or specific. Many people here are familiar with the Lean Gains (18/6) and the Eat Stop Eat approaches, in which you have fasting windows of 18-24 hours, but never actually have an entire day where you do not eat (well for most people most of the time). There are many supposed ben Continue reading >>

Get The Apps!

Get The Apps!

Two things in particular are very important to me: Eating the foods I love and staying lean. If I feel like eating donuts, I eat donuts. When I want a beer, a margarita or a sake bomb, I imbibe. If I'm at a restaurant, I'll get a steak and some delicious sides, then finish it off with dessert. In other words, I eat what I want, when I want it. (Within reason, of course.) Oh, and also, I have six-pack abs. I might go as high as 6% body fat during certain periods, but generally I stay at 4%-5% year round. Most people think you have to choose one or the other: Eat foods you enjoy or be lean. Wrong – you can do both. How is this possible, you might be wondering? Intermittent fasting, that's how. Intermittent fasting ("IF" for short) isn't for everyone. Some people try it and find they don't like it and/or it doesn't work with their lifestyle. I also wouldn't recommend IF as an excuse to eat nothing but junk food, thinking you're going to get ripped that way. But if you've reached a point where your diet is fairly clean and you've hit a fat-burning plateau, IF may be something worth considering. Intermittent Fasting Breakdown Intermittent fasting is a technique where you fast for an extended period of time, then follow that fast with a period of eating, and cycle back and forth between these fasting and feeding periods. The type of IF that I've found to work best for losing body fat and maintaining muscle is 16/8 intermittent fasting. That means every day you fast for 16 hours and have an 8-hour feeding window. (I've recently taken this basic 16/8 IF scheme to the next level of fat-burning with my new Intermittent Fasting Carb Cycle (IFCC) diet; that said, I recommend reading this introductory IF article first before jumping into IFCC.) Intermittent fasting has become incr Continue reading >>

Macro Calculator

Macro Calculator

Body Composition Set your current weight, in pounds or kilograms, and your bodyfat percentage. (How to visually estimate bodyfat %) Activity Level (not counting exercise): Set your usual activity level. This does not include additional exercise like gym, running, etc. If not known, choose Sedentary. Choose "Custom" to set your TDEE manually. Multipliers for activities are taken from Chapter 8 of "Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism, 5th Edition" Daily Calories Set your goal to get your recommended calorie intake. If you used the Exercise Info section above, then you can compare calories for those days that you exercise and those that you don't. It is not recommended to go over 25% deficit for fat loss or over 15% surplus for muscle gain. Daily Exercise Info If needed, set your exercise information for those days that you will be exercising. (Click here for Kcal / min calculations). This will allow you to compare calorie limits on those days that you exercise against those that you don't. Activity Minutes Kcal burned / min Total Kcal burned Weights Cardio Other Daily Macros Adjust your protein ratio: To maintain muscle, leave protein ratio between 0.69 to 0.8. It is not recommended to drop below 0.69 or muscle loss may occur. To gain muscle, the protein ratio should be between 0.8 to 1.2. There is normally no advantage to consuming more than 0.82g/lb (1.8g/kg) of protein per day to preserve or build muscle once you're past the novice level as a natural trainee. Source. Adjust the carbs and fat grams to reach daily calorie goals. If doing a Standard Ketogenic Diet, carbs should be set lower than 30g: It is suggested you count carbs as TOTAL for all foods, except for green veggies and avocado, on those count as NET. Protein Ratio Macronutrients Macro Grams Kcal per gra Continue reading >>

My 10 Week Transformation

My 10 Week Transformation

Do you wonder what I’ve been up to lately? Well, over these past 10 weeks, I decided to get lean. Check out my results: Before (Monday, May 2) Weight: 199.8 lbs Bodyfat Percentage: 20% After (Saturday, July 16) Weight: 178.6 lbs Bodyfat Percentage: 10.5% (Measurements were taken using the InBody 520) How I Did It: I ate for fat loss. I trained for fat loss. I didn’t joke around. My daily calorie intake was my body weight (in lbs) x 10. For example, the first week, I weighed approximately 200 lbs, so my calorie intake that week was 2000kcal per day. To give you an idea of how low this number is, I was eating 3500kcal per day before I started this diet. The only things I ate on this diet were: meat, eggs, lots of non-starchy vegetables (and I mean LOTS), olive oil, nuts, and the occasional tub of plain organic Greek yogurt. That’s it. This may shock you, but in order to get lean, you need to eat like a human is intended to eat. I know that you may be wondering: what about fruit? Fruit is awesome, and is great for you. I didn’t eat it because I wanted my body to go into ketosis (think Atkins diet). That’s right, no carbs. Obviously, to every rule, there is an exception. Every 2 weeks, I had a re-feed day. On this re-feed day, I ate whatever I wanted. Fruit? Oh ya. Bread? Yup. Cake, ice cream, dessert? Ya baby. These days kept my body from going too far into ketosis, and got my metabolism revving again. It may seem counter intuitive, but these days helped me lose more fat. (My diet was a modification of The Get Shredded Diet by John Berardi). In terms of training, I lifted weights 3 times per week (each session lasted under an hour). On off days, I would take my TRX to the park (if it was nice out), or I would do barbell complexes in the gym (if I felt like it). I Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet

Protein is an essential nutrient for building muscle and improving your performance. Aim for one gram per pound of bodyweight per day. No one needs more than that. Confused about the best muscle building diet to become a strong, lean badass? Sick of trying to figure out exactly how to eat for optimal health AND physical performance? You’re not alone. With thousands of conflicting articles, it seems like you can’t eat anything anymore. “Carb are evil” vs “You have to eat carbs to train hard and be fit.” “Protein is essential for building muscle” vs. “Meat is going to give you cancer and make your face fall off.” It’s maddening and leaves you helpless. You sit there thinking, “If this whole fitness thing is so complicated, f*ck it. I’m out.” It doesn’t have to be this way. You don’t have to become one of those weirdos who practices religious adherence to a certain diet. And you certainly don’t have to feel your head spin as you try to navigate the world of nutrition. I’m able to maintain visible results year round, as are my clients, by eating just 1-2 big meals per day and not having to survive on boiled chicken breasts and steamed broccoli. In fact, we can do it while eating delicious meals every day of the week. Below, you will find 8 important tips that will give you everything you need to get strong and ripped. And at the same time, they will give you tons of energy and lifelong health. This list is the result of nearly 30 years of experimentation on myself and thousands of clients. It also includes the essential takeaways from countless conversations with nutrition experts, performance coaches, and doctors who specialize in health, performance, and longevity. By following these principles, you can expect to achieve… ● Faster a Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Bodybuilding isn’t easy or achieved quickly. It takes time, dedication, a lot of exercises, and the right diet plan. A lot has been said about ketogenic diets and their ability to strip body fat while preserving muscle, and it has made a name for itself amongst heavyweights in the field. But is the ketogenic diet for bodybuilding right for you? Most if not all fitness models and bodybuilder competitors include a low carb eating program at a point. The idea is before a competition or photo shoot; their muscles will have increased definition. When the event is complete, regular dieting is resumed. Bodybuilders or weightlifters looking to achieve a ripped physique can use high-fat ketogenic dieting for preserving lean muscle and increase fat loss efficiently.(1) What is a Ketogenic Diet In the most basic terms, a ketogenic diet is high in fat, has good protein levels, and is very low in carbohydrates. For a more detailed look check out our introduction to a ketogenic diet. This pushes your body into a ketogenic state, which means you start burning fat to fuel your everyday activities. Low-calorie diets can have similar slimming effects, but with them, you also risk losing muscle, which is the exact opposite of what bodybuilders are looking for. Another advantage of ketosis is the strong diuretic effect. This is a fancy way of telling you that you’ll shed water weight. Save LowCarbAlpha Ketogenic Diet for Bodybuilding It’s very common for weightlifters beginning a keto diet to experience loss of strength. Many people get turned off instantly blaming the low level of carbs and give up on this diet. Leave your ego at the door and simply push some lighter weights. You must realize your body is going through many changes adapting to high fat foods. Your strength will come Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting And Bodybuilding: How To Reconcile Them

Intermittent Fasting And Bodybuilding: How To Reconcile Them

Intermittent fasting and bodybuilding are compatible and potentially beneficial, but there is a rule to follow. Gaining muscle, losing body fat is not only a benefit to the silhouette, but also to overall health, whether it is to prevent metabolic diseases or bone fractures. To achieve this, diet and exercise are often combined. Intermittent fasting seduces more and more; For its part, bodybuilding is becoming more and more popular, and not only among teenagers and young people looking to expand. But what happens when we combine fasting and bodybuilding? Bodybuilding + fasting: yes, but … In a recent study (2017), American researchers at the University of Texas compared for 8 weeks two groups invited to practice bodybuilding 3 times a week: one followed a classic diet, the other a form of fasting intermittent which consisted of rest days to feed only during a “window” of four hours, to choose between 16 hours and midnight, without limitation of calories. Results: intermittent fasting resulted in lower calorie consumption compared to the normal feeding group, but without loss of muscle strength. Better yet, among the practitioners of intermittent fasting, the muscle strength and endurance of the lower limbs has increased more than in the other group; ditto for the endurance of the muscles of the upper body. In contrast, their muscle mass dropped slightly (-200 grams), while participants in the “normal diet” group gained 2.5 kilos of muscle on average. A more detailed analysis reveals that this difference is due to a lower protein consumption: 1 gram per kilogram of weight in the “fasting” group but 1.4 gram in the “normal diet” group. In another older study (2007), intermittent fasting of the same type (4 hours of feeding per day) combined with bodybuil Continue reading >>

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