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Insulin Resistance Keto

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Carl Franklin and Richard Morris talk to Ivor Cummins about his work with Hungarian Biologist Gabor Erdosi based on research that paints a more detailed picture of how insulin resistance happens. It turns out that adipose tissue (fat cells) have a much bigger role to play in metabolic dysfunction than previously thought. This is a fascinating discussion.

Insulin Resistance From The Ground Up With Ivor Cummins

Carl Franklin and Richard Morris talk to Ivor Cummins about his work with Hungarian Biologist Gabor Erdosi based on research that paints a more detailed picture of how insulin resistance happens. It turns out that adipose tissue (fat cells) have a much bigger role to play in metabolic dysfunction than previously thought. This is a fascinating discussion. Ivor Cummins is a Chemical Engineer who spent 25 years in Engineering Lead and Engineering Manager positions. He has worked in the Medical Device, Special Purpose Equipment and Electronic Component industries, always gravitating towards the most complex interactions where the Physics comes alive. His specialty throughout has been leadership in Complex Problem Solving Methodology (Comparative Analysis, Mechanistic Analysis and Experimental/Statistical Inference) - the ultimate destination was always Root Cause Resolution in the minimum timeframe. Following less-than-ideal blood test results he went back to his Biochemical Engineering roots and intensively studied the mechanistic physics and primary drivers of Dyslipidemia, elevated GGT and Serum Ferritin. Ivor has analysed several hundred related papers and studies carried out over Continue reading >>

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  1. Fry

    To my knowledge this has been demonstrated in mice. Mice that were not necessarily fed a healthy diet and that are mice and not as likely to eat that kind of diet like humans are in nature, for the past hundred thousand years.
    However of all the studies in humans, while there have been some negative ones showing arterial stiffness or other issues, there have been none, that I know of, showing the diet to cause insulin resistance and several that showed increased insulin sensitivity.
    I have read that while in ketosis one will develop insulin resistance but it is a temporary and necessary response by your body to ensure that your brain gets enough glucose and, most importantly, that this resistance is completely reversible and sensitivity will go back up if/when one started eating carbs again.

    Does anyone know? Studies? Science?

  2. brownfat

    Blood glucose tracking can give a good sense of changing insulin resistance. If over time on the diet your fasted bg is falling and/or your post prandial bg rise to a particular food diminishes then you are likely becoming more insulin sensitive. Fasting should help.

  3. VLC.MD

    A foundational principle of low carb diets is that they lower insulin resistance in humans.

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What is INSULIN RESISTANCE? What does INSULIN RESISTANCE mean? INSULIN RESISTANCE meaning - INSULIN RESISTANCE definition - INSULIN RESISTANCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or laten

Insulin Resistance! ..... And Chocolate Brains

Okay, so not the sexiest topic but very timely... As we’ve got the sweetest holiday coming up in just one week, I’ve got to drop some knowledge regarding Insulin Resistance so you can keep yourself and your loved ones safe. Oh and read to the end where I give you an awesome recipe for Chocolate Brains! If you’re "meeting" me for the first time EVER, my name is Kate Jaramillo and I am a Ketogenic Lifestyle Expert, the Creator of Ketogenic Living 101, 102 and the Ketogenic Living Coach Certification, a Badass Wellness Advocate, and a #girlmom. Soooo Insulin Resistance: Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. When blood sugar levels are elevated, the pancreas runs into overdrive to create enough insulin to remove that sugar from the bloodstream. What ends up happening is that the cells build up a tolerance to the insulin being produced, they stop responding, and blood sugar levels elevate. This is Insulin Resistance. Initially, insulin resistance shows no symptoms, but eventually someone who is insulin resistant may experience weight gain mostly in the midsection Continue reading >>

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  1. Bebo321

    @azure @Brunneria @tim2000s, I would be interested to hear your thoughts on an observation of increased insulin resistance with a very low carb/keto diet.
    I was discussing this topic recently with somebody with T1D (we tried a food fast together over a number of days)
    They noticed that coming back out of the fast, their insulin requirements had increased fairly significantly in order to manage any carb they ate (the increased requirements only lasted a few days). Interestingly, their basal had remained exactly the same throughout the fast however and blood glucose levels had remained level. This would suggest that their 'insulin resistance' hadn't actually changed at all.
    What we considered had perhaps happened was that the body had become so effective at burning ketones and generating its own glucose requirements (gluconeogenesis), that once carbs were re-introduced, the body was fairly 'ambivalent' to it - after all, it had everything it needed to fuel itself perfectly well up until that point. Without cells calling out for a top up of glucose, more insulin would be required in order to be effective at taking the glucose out of the bloodstream.
    This was a temporary effect and therefore perhaps different to insulin resistance created through the build up of fat deposits.
    Anyway, I thought I would relay this to you (and anyone who might have their own experience to add).
    Perhaps it is misleading to think of the body's adaptation to a low carb diet as becoming 'insulin resistant' and it might be better instead to think of it becoming 'fat complient'

  2. azure

    It's referred to as physiological insulin resistancE and correctly so, in my opinion @Bebo321
    We were discussing this on a recent thread so when I get the chance, I'll put links in for you and other readers
    http://freetheanimal.com/2014/10/physiological-resistance-carbohydrate.html
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/does-eating-low-carb-cause-insulin-resistance/#comment-3087940. (Read the comment and then scroll to the top of the page for the article)
    Info about the effect of fat:
    http://www.joslin.org/dietary-fat-can-affect-insulin-requirements-in-type-1-diabetes.html
    So, to answer your question, I believe it is insulin resistance - just with a specific cause.
    It's good that the body can run on ketones when needed, but it's not something I'd be wanting to happen full time - not as a Type 1 and not if I didn't have any type of diabetes at all.

  3. tim2000s

    @Bebo321 Yup, that's exactly my experience too. I used to cyclically Low Carb while training and my insulin requirements during my carb refeeds were about 1.5x to 2x over those two days, however, when dropping back in to low carb, it went back to what was expected.
    When I've done it for a longer period, the first 2-3 days back are always heavier on the insulin. But I've always considered that "Carb resistance" rather than "Insulin resistance".
    I've never experienced low carb when done for any length of time causing an increase in insulin requirements, but I've always done it alongside resistance training, which makes a significant difference to muscle insulin sensitivity, and therefore I've used it partially as a cutting technique. So I can't say that low carb in and of itself has ever caused me physiological insulin resistance.
    But, and there's a big but here, what is described in the Joslin report is rather different to this effect, as it's the "Fat as accelerant" issue that's been discussed multiple times on the forum, and of its own account demonstrates the linkages that have been observed by many T1s but also in a number of studies, regarding eating fat and carbs together.

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64: Keto Vs. Raw Vegan, Dry Eyes, Weaning Off Insulin, Rosacea, Mechanism Of Insulin Resistance

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam tackle diet misconceptions and bring your weekly dose of good news on the low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic lifestyle in Episode 64. Here’s what Jimmy and Adam t Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Fry

    To my knowledge this has been demonstrated in mice. Mice that were not necessarily fed a healthy diet and that are mice and not as likely to eat that kind of diet like humans are in nature, for the past hundred thousand years.
    However of all the studies in humans, while there have been some negative ones showing arterial stiffness or other issues, there have been none, that I know of, showing the diet to cause insulin resistance and several that showed increased insulin sensitivity.
    I have read that while in ketosis one will develop insulin resistance but it is a temporary and necessary response by your body to ensure that your brain gets enough glucose and, most importantly, that this resistance is completely reversible and sensitivity will go back up if/when one started eating carbs again.

    Does anyone know? Studies? Science?

  2. brownfat

    Blood glucose tracking can give a good sense of changing insulin resistance. If over time on the diet your fasted bg is falling and/or your post prandial bg rise to a particular food diminishes then you are likely becoming more insulin sensitive. Fasting should help.

  3. VLC.MD

    A foundational principle of low carb diets is that they lower insulin resistance in humans.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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