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What Is Insulin?

Insulin is a hormone that is important for metabolism and utilization of energy from the ingested nutrients - especially glucose. Insulin chemistry and etymology Insulin is a protein chain or peptide hormone. There are 51 amino acids in an insulin molecule. It has a molecular weight of 5808 Da. Insulin is produced in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. The name insulin comes from the Latin ''insula'' for "island" from the cells that produce the hormone in the pancreas. Insulin's structure varies slightly between species of animal. Both porcine (from pigs) and bovine (from cows) insulin are similar to human insulin but porcine insulin resembles human insulin more closely. What does insulin do? Insulin has several broad actions including: It causes the cells in the liver, muscle, and fat tissue to take up glucose from blood and convert it to glycogen that can be stored in the liver and muscles Insulin also prevents the utilization of fat as an energy source. In absence of insulin or in conditions where insulin is low glucose is not taken up by body cells, and the body begins to use fat as an energy source Insulin also controls other body systems and regulates the amino acid upt Continue reading >>

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  1. jlr820, BSN

    Yes it is. The bloodstream is absolutely full of glucose (since it isn't entering cells and being metabolized). This glucose load makes the blood HYPERosmolar and the kidneys respond by trying to remove glucose through urination. They cannot effectively deal with the large glucose load, and that's why glucose "spills" into the urine. The process of excessive urine output secondary to the large glucose load is called osmotic diuresis, and the client loses a HUGE amount of fluid through this diuretic effect, leading to profound dehydration.

  2. NRSKarenRN

    check out these prior posts:
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  3. ghurricane

    Thanks so much!! Here is another oddity that makes no sense. I know there is potassium depletion due to frequent urination, but why do labs usually indicate hyperkalemia?

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What is INSULIN? INSULIN meaning - INSULIN pronunciation - INSULIN explanation - INSULIN definition - How to pronounce INSULIN? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license.

Insulin

This article is about the insulin protein. For uses of insulin in treating diabetes, see insulin (medication). Not to be confused with Inulin. Insulin (from Latin insula, island) is a peptide hormone produced by beta cells of the pancreatic islets, and it is considered to be the main anabolic hormone of the body.[5] It regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and protein by promoting the absorption of, especially, glucose from the blood into fat, liver and skeletal muscle cells.[6] In these tissues the absorbed glucose is converted into either glycogen via glycogenesis or fats (triglycerides) via lipogenesis, or, in the case of the liver, into both.[6] Glucose production and secretion by the liver is strongly inhibited by high concentrations of insulin in the blood.[7] Circulating insulin also affects the synthesis of proteins in a wide variety of tissues. It is therefore an anabolic hormone, promoting the conversion of small molecules in the blood into large molecules inside the cells. Low insulin levels in the blood have the opposite effect by promoting widespread catabolism, especially of reserve body fat. Beta cells are sensitive to glucose concentrations, also known as Continue reading >>

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  1. atcgirl

    I started 5:2 in september and initially tried to spread my 500 calories accross the day, but I lost no weight and couldn’t cope with the hunger pangs. Then I started just having all my 500 calories at dinner, with zero calories during the day (just a green tea in the morning for the caffeine), and I started losing a pound a week. I figure that my body needed to go into ketosis to actually shift the pounds.
    I am sick of green tea, I actually hate it. Black coffee isn’t an option because it gives me bad breath, so I’m going to need to go back to black tea with milk (no sugar). I figure semi skimmed is better than skimmed because having more fat in it leave less room for lactose and I only have a splash of milk, but will this bring me out of ketosis for any significant period?
    I know that my body will use some of the lactose as energy, I figure it can’t be for that long, but it’s going to try and do that as efficiently as possible; I don’t know enough about the science behind all this.
    Body building forums state all sorts of numbers from 10 calories to 50 and most of my googling has been fruitless. Anyone know?
    Thanks

  2. Pot-bellied Heron

    My understanding is that you won’t get into ketosis on the 5:2 though I haven’t really looked into it.

  3. atcgirl

    Some sites I’ve read suggest ketosis starts 8 to 12 hours after your last meal, others suggest it’s actually much longer – 48 hours. Which had me confused anyway.
    Normally i’d just experiment but I have a month until my love handles need to not show under my wedding dress and would prefer not to delay further weightloss
    It’s so little milk I have to believe it won’t make a difference! Also hoping it won’t affect IGF-1 levels but I think lots of people on here have already proved that it doesn’t because their levels have dropped even though they spread the calories out during the day.

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~~~ Insulin ~~~ Title: What is Insulin? Explain Insulin, Define Insulin, Meaning of Insulin Created on: 2018-10-12 Source Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin ------ Description: Insulin is a peptide hormone produced by beta cells of the pancreatic islets; it is considered to be the main anabolic hormone of the body. It regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and protein by promoting the absorption of carbohydrates, especially glucose from the blood into liver, fat and skeletal muscle cells. In these tissues the absorbed glucose is converted into either glycogen via glycogenesis or fats via lipogenesis, or, in the case of the liver, into both. Glucose production and secretion by the liver is strongly inhibited by high concentrations of insulin in the blood. Circulating insulin also affects the synthesis of proteins in a wide variety of tissues. It is therefore an anabolic hormone, promoting the conversion of small molecules in the blood into large molecules inside the cells. Low insulin levels in the blood have the opposite effect by promoting widespread catabolism, especially of reserve body fat. Beta cells are sensitive to glucose concentrations, also known as blood sugar levels. When the glucose level is high, the beta cells secrete insulin into the blood; when glucose levels are low, secretion of insulin is inhibited. Their neighboring alpha cells, by taking their cues from the beta cells, secrete glucagon into the blood in the opposite manner: increased secretion when blood glucose is low, and decreased secretion when glucose concentrations are high. Glucagon, through stimulating the liver to release glucose by glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, has the opposite effect of insulin. The secretion of insulin and glucagon into the blood in response to the blood glucose concentration is the primary mechanism of glucose homeostasis.If beta cells are destroyed by an autoimmune reaction, insulin can no longer be synthesized or be secreted into the blood. This results in type 1 diabetes mellitus, which is characterized by abnormally high blood glucose concentrations, and generalized body wasting. In type 2 diabetes mellitus the destruction of beta cells is less pronounced than in type 1 diabetes, and is not due to an autoimmune process. Instead there is an accumulation of amyloid in the pancreatic islets, which likely disrupts their anatomy and physiology. The pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes is not well understood but patients exhibit a reduced population of islet beta-cells, reduced secretory function of islet beta-cells that survive, and peripheral tissue insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high rates of glucagon secretion into the blood which are unaffected by, and unresponsive to the concentration of glucose in the blood. Insulin is still secreted into the blood in response to the blood glucose. As a result, the insulin levels, even when the blood sugar level is normal, are much higher than they are in healthy persons. The human insulin protein is composed of 51 amino acids, and has a molecular mass of 5808 Da. It is a dimer of an A-chain and a B-chain, which are linked together by disulfide bonds. Insulin's structure varies slightly between species of animals. Insulin from animal sources differs somewhat in effectiveness from human insulin because of these variations. Porcine insulin is especially close to the human version, and was widely used to treat type 1 diabetics before human insulin could be produced in large quantities by recombinant DNA technologies.The crystal structure of insulin in the solid state was determined by Dorothy Hodgkin. It is on the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system. ------ To see your favorite topic here, fill out this request form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FA... ------ Source: Wikipedia.org articles, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Support: Donations can be made from https://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/... to support Wikimedia Foundation and knowledge sharing.

What Is Insulin?

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). The cells in your body need sugar for energy. However, sugar cannot go into most of your cells directly. After you eat food and your blood sugar level rises, cells in your pancreas (known as beta cells) are signaled to release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin then attaches to and signals cells to absorb sugar from the bloodstream. Insulin is often described as a “key,” which unlocks the cell to allow sugar to enter the cell and be used for energy. If you have more sugar in your body than it needs, insulin helps store the sugar in your liver and releases it when your blood sugar level is low or if you need more sugar, such as in between meals or during physical activity. Therefore, insulin helps balance out blood sugar levels and keeps them in a normal range. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas secretes more insulin. If your body does not produce enough insulin or your cells are resistan Continue reading >>

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  1. ALonelyHero

    no brain fog. no anxiety. no mood swings. more energy since being on keto

    srs. Not only has it cured me (at least sent it into remission) of my IBD - i am also, mentally, feeling better than ever and have received many more benefits, as stated in the title.
    Anyone else received benefits such as these? Anyone know the science behind it?
    I am thinking about purchasing the book Grain Brain to learn more about it.

  2. Zvezdobroeca

    If you want the science behind it you need to read "The Ketogenic Diet" by Lyle McDonald. It's a very technical book for the most part and you'll need medical knowledge to fully understand it.
    I've also received these benefits and I think they're not because of the diet alone but the combination of keto and exercise.

  3. Spawn8214

    These are actually all the very well known and well documented benefits of the Ketogenic diet. I experience these same benefits when I do a ketogenic diet.
    Here's why this happens in simple terms. I would recommend reading more about it though, what I am saying here is just a quick summation.
    Basically, when your body adapts to ketosis, it switches to using fat as it's source of energy instead of carbs. This is because ketones are a bi-product of fat breakdown in your body. Now, as this process occurs, your body stops depending on carbs for energy which means your insulin levels lower. Because of this, your appetite becomes blunted, thus less cravings.
    You feel more energetic also because our bodies are actually VERY efficient at breaking down fat and extracting ketones to use for energy (once it no longer depends on carbs of course). When we consume carbs, our blood sugar spikes and you feel great and energetic, but between meals, your blood sugar crashes and causes cravings and makes you feel tired and not very energetic. Since, when in ketosis, your blood sugar isn't spiking and crashing all the time, and our bodies are great at breaking down fat for ketones, you feel more energetic.
    From what I found about IBD benefits from ketosis, it's not directly related to the state of ketosis helping IBD, but the fact that the foods you must eat (or not eat rather) to do the ketogenic diet help IBD. A lot of people have received similar IBD benefits from doing the Paleo Diet. Which, if you look at the foods you eat on the paleo diet and the foods you eat on the ketogenic diet, there is one thing that both of them avoid

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