diabetestalk.net

In And Out Of Ketosis Daily

Ok, In And Out Of Ketosis ?

Ok, In And Out Of Ketosis ?

I have been going in and out of ketosis or so says the ketostix it takes me about 3-4 days to get in, or so i thought, but it seems if i pee after I eat a fatty meal then bam i get purple, like yesterday I ate fried chicken wings (light batter) and the cheese and pepperoni off of a few slices of pizza while i was in New Orleans. Once I got home it was like 6pm and i peed and got dark purple. ok cool, i have been waiting to get back in ketosis since tuesday when i kicked myself out by eating too much tomato paste, or so i thought, but last night when i ate dinner, after showing purple I ate 7 oz of chicken breast, so like no fat hardly, this morning I wake up, peed and show nothing i read on here to only test the stix in the morning but if i were to do that, i would have never known if i was in or kicked out of ketosis either way I am having a LOT of fun with this diet and I am gonna keep it up. damn USGA having us eat a bunch of carbs since the 70s to feed thier agriculture industry, the wool was pulled over my eyes long enough, I was buying low fat and fat free this and that, what i dummy i was. haha. Ketones are broken down fat molecules, and your body excretes them to maintain the proper ph balance, since ketones are acidic. So yes, you will show more ketones on the ketostix after digesting a high-fat meal. Don't go completely by the stix. If you are using all your ketones, and not excreting them, you will show trace to negative on the stix, even if you are still in ketosis. Same thing goes if you are dehydrated. Just watch your carbs once you are in and you will be good. Learn the other signs of ketosis, like acetone breath, certain kind of headache, etc. If I'm not using stix I mainly go by my breath. I can taste the acetone and know I'm in. Continue reading >>

Should You Have Cheat Meals On A Ketogenic Diet?

Should You Have Cheat Meals On A Ketogenic Diet?

Damn does that cake look good! Cheat meals. Everyone thinks about them when following any diet, and the ketogenic diet is no exception. You might be wondering if you should have cheat meals while going keto. Is it worth it? Is it okay? Will it mess up your progress completely? Intellectually, why would you want to eat something that isn’t in line with your goals or your health? Let’s face it, cheat day meals are bad for you. We know it. The ketogenic diet is simple, but not always easy, and there are some grey areas, so lLet’s talk a little bit about what happens when you have cheat meals and whether or not they’re worth it. You might know people who do low-carb long-term and schedule cheat meals in at regular times, such as on the weekends or set days each month. While this creates a healthy mindset around not needing to be perfect, things are a little different with the ketogenic diet. Since keto is stricter than other low-carb diets, (see our post on keto vs. Atkins) it’s more tempting to have cheat meals. However, the effects of them can be more dramatic. Disadvantages of Cheat Meals on the Ketogenic Diet Here are some consequences of having cheat meals. These are things to consider before flying off the deep end with some emotional eating. Let’s get the big one out of the way first, Cheating Takes You out of Ketosis Since cheating on the keto diet more than likely will take you out of ketosis—especially if the cheat meal or snack is carb-heavy—you have to be prepared for this fact. Know that it’ll likely set you back some and take some time to get back into a ketogenic state. When you have eaten what you suspect was a “cheat meal,” put it to the acid test, and test your ketone levels. People are often surprised that they stay in ketosis after Continue reading >>

11 Low Carb Vegetables That You Can Safely Eat On The Ketogenic Diet

11 Low Carb Vegetables That You Can Safely Eat On The Ketogenic Diet

Doing well on the ketogenic diet means that you understand the right foods to eat. Because your mom told you to eat your vegetables that means you need to get some vegetables into your system daily. But on keto, not all vegetables are good to have. Why? Because vegetables contain carbs! This is one of those mind-blowing facts that seems to take people aback. Carbs are in bread, pastas, and sweets, what the heck are they doing in vegetables? I can’t tell you why they’re there. They’re just there. They aren’t crazy like in bread but they are there depending on the vegetable. In this post, I want to show you some of the veggies that you are safe to eat on the ketogenic diet. What Vegetables Can You Eat on Keto? An important rule of thumb to keep in mind is that if the vegetable is grown above ground (spinach), then chances are you can eat it on keto. Lettuce is an exception in that if you eat too much you can easily knock yourself out of ketosis. If the vegetable grows below ground then you should stay away. Celery Celery is one of those weird zero-calorie foods that actually helps you burn more calories than you consume. I guess that’s why it’s pointless eating celery unless you can dip it into something. Thankfully on keto, you have the luxury of mixing your celery with either ranch or almond butter. Please don’t mix both together because that is just gross. Really gross. Spinach Spinach is the goto veggie for a lot of keto dishes. I like to mix it with my eggs in the morning and if I need a quick snack I’ll grab a handful of spinach, pour some ranch on it, and I’m good to go. One of my favorite keto recipes is this Spinach Mexican Casserole. Funny thing is that I absolutely hated spinach as a child. Now? It’s not so bad. Asparagus If you could marry Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

One of the main goals of starting the ketogenic diet is to get your body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. Note: If you don’t know what the ketogenic is all about then check out the Ketogenic Diet: Beginner’s Guide to Keto and Weight Loss. This is when your body starts to produce a lot of ketones to supply energy for your body. Why is this good? Because it means your body has converted from a sugar-burner to a fat-burner. If your body is burning fat for energy then something amazing starts to happen. The fat on your body starts to disappear. But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Besides using test strips or an instrument there are some signs that your body will give. 7 Signs You Might Be in Ketosis These don’t 100% guarantee that your body is in ketosis but if it is in ketosis then these signs will appear. 1. Weight Loss One of the obvious signs of ketosis is weight loss but this can also be pretty deceptive because many people don’t experience the kind of weight loss that they expect. This can happen for a variety of reasons but when you get close to entering ketosis or do enter ketosis you’ll find that you lose a healthy amount of weight quickly. For example, when you switch to low carbs you usually experience significant weight loss in the first week. In fact, my wife lost 12 lbs in the first 28 days of Keto and I lost 13. This isn’t your body burning fat but finally being able to release the water that was being held by the fat cells. If your fat cells don’t release this water then they can’t flow through the bloodstream to be used as fuel so losing water weight is a good thing. After the initial rapid drop in water weight, you should continue to lose body fat consistently if you are able to stick with the low-carb aspects of the diet Continue reading >>

Is Going In And Out Of Ketosis Bad?

Is Going In And Out Of Ketosis Bad?

In the earlier stages of adaptation going into ketosis may feel bad and going out may stop your progress for a fair while, so is to be avoided if all possible IMHO. Eventually once properly adapted you should have a lot more metabolic flexibility and will more readily switch. At that point you should mostly not notice anything anymore. Apart from how it feels, it is IMHO obviously not bad for you to switch energy pathways as conditions demand, that’s just part of how your metabolism works to help ensure you’re properly fuelled. According to Dr. Colin Champ, oncologist and assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, for weight loss in someone who doesn’t have much to lose, periodic ketosis for a couple days seems to work. For others with a lot of weight to lose and/or those that do poorly with carbohydrates, the diet may need to be maintained for several months. He said: “I personally go in and out of ketosis frequently, getting very strict every month or two for about 5 days. I have been in ketosis for 6 months and even over a year, but function and feel better when I avoid long-term ketosis.” Anecdotally, when some individuals still have some fat to burn, they thrive in ketosis for longer periods of time more so than others. Some longer-term ketogenic diet followers do experience hormonal changes and probably should not be on the diet for an extended period of time. Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Dangerous To Go In And Out Of Ketosis Often? : Atkins Diet Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

Dangerous To Go In And Out Of Ketosis Often? : Atkins Diet Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

Dangerous to go in and out of ketosis often? Dangerous to go in and out of ketosis often? Hey group! I'm a long time lurker at these forums. I always said I'd register when I had a question, so here I am! I'm 20 and male and I'm 6 feet even. Well, my question is this: is it dangerous to go in and out of ketosis often? I tried searching on the message board, but typing in "ketosis" gave me way too many results to sift through! I have a friend, female, who did Atkins for 11 months and lost over 80 pounds. What she did was she would do the Atkins diet for three weeks each month, and then spend one week eating whatever she wanted. Even though she gained a few pounds at the end of each month, she was still losing more weight, and by the end, she was 80 pounds lighter. Now she's on a great plan to keep the weight off. She recommended this strategy to me, and I've been doing it for five months. I'm losing weight quickly and only gain about 1 pound during my free week, and it's really nice to have the free week each month because I don't have the willpower to go without my favorite foods for very long. I tried Atkins before in 2003 and failed, but this seems to be working for me almost too well. However, I'm worried that it could be dangerous to go in and out of ketosis so often. My friend told me this plan was good because it didn't allow as many ketones to build up in your kidneys, promoting better kidney health. Is there any truth in this? I'd appreciate any thoughts on this issue, because I really love having the free week at the end of each month. It makes the diet seem effortless! But I'm worried that constant changes on my body could have health effects. Does anyone have any thoughts on this? Please let me know, thanks! I think the only danger she is possibly looking at Continue reading >>

What Happens When You Fall Out Of Ketosis During Dieting?

What Happens When You Fall Out Of Ketosis During Dieting?

Ketosis, a metabolic state where fat rather than carbohydrates becomes your primary energy source, occurs only when you follow a low-carbohydrate diet or a near-starvation diet. Your body normally uses carbohydrates for energy. On a low-carb diet, you cut carbohydrate consumption, so your body must find a new energy source. Eating as little as 50 and 100 g of carbohydrate per day can keep you out of ketosis, registered dietitian Janice Hermann, Ph.D. of Oklahoma State University reports. If you fall out of ketosis, a low-carbohydrate diet may not work for weight loss. Video of the Day Falling out of ketosis may slow or stop your weight loss, because low-carb diets don’t generally count calories. In fact, you may eat more calories while in ketosis and still lose weight. The official Atkins website published an abstract presented at the North American Association for the Study of Obesity Annual Meeting 2003. The 12-week study found that subjects following a low-carb diet who were consuming 300 calories per day more than subjects eating a low-calorie diet still lost more weight. However, if you are still eating fewer calories than you use, you may continue to lose weight even if you’re no longer in ketosis. Ketone Test Strip Changes Ketone test strips measure the concentration of ketones in your urine. The specially impregnated sticks turn purple when urine contains enough ketones to register. Generally speaking, the darker the purple, the deeper your degree of ketosis. If your ketone test strips were previously turning purple, the test strips will not change color if you’re no longer in ketosis. Being in ketosis appears to have an appetite-suppressant effect. This may help you eat less without feeling hungry while following a low-carbohydrate diet. If you're no long Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq

Ketogenic Diet Faq

With all the new people finding, switching, and transitioning into a low carb diet, I figured it was about time I put together an FAQ on all the common questions that are asked when someone is starting out. I don’t go too in depth in the answers, but I tried to give a direct answer and then link to a more in depth article on the topic to help you fully understand it. If you have any other questions you’d like to be added, changed, or are unsure about – please feel free to leave a comment below so I can fully explain, or make changes to the answers on this page. Best wishes, and to all the new people out there – good luck and happy dieting! Frequently Asked Questions Click any of the questions below and it will take you to the answer. How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis? A ketogenic diet is not a diet that you can whimfully choose to go on and off of at any point. It takes time for your body to adjust and go into a state known as ketosis. This process? Anywhere from 2 – 7 days, depending on your body type, activity levels, and what you’re eating. The fastest way to get into ketosis is to exercise on an empty stomach, restrict your carbohydrate intake to 20g or less per day, and be vigilant with your water intake. To improve the rate at which you enter ketosis, there is a method called Fat Fasting. I’ve written an article on Fat Fasting on a Ketogenic Diet and everything involved with it. Make sure that if you use this method, it is only for a few days, otherwise it can bring harm to you. Where Can I Find Low Carb Recipes? Everywhere on the internet! There’s recipes on almost every health website nowadays, and a quick Google of what you want will definitely help you out. You can even convert high carb recipes that use sugar or fruits in them to low c Continue reading >>

Moving In And Out Of Ketosis

Moving In And Out Of Ketosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Guys, can you move in and out of ketosis on a day-to-day basis? If you go up to 50g for the odd day when you're on <30g, does your body start functioning in a different way? And you wouldn't get the unpleasant carb flu thing again, would you? Yes, you certainly can move in and out of ketosis on a daily basis and your body will keep adjusting but it will probably cause havoc to your BG control. it's best to either stay in or out of ketosis. TBH your body only burns ketones when it needs to, so just by blipping under whatever your magic carb level is (and that is different for everybody) for a day wouldn't have any impact if your body already has enough fuel from the carb you ate yesterday. Although I only have around 50g of carb a day, at my body weight, this actually keeps me just out of ketosis. I don't know about the unpleasant flu effect as I never get that when going into ketosis - but my BG swings wildly if I keep changing the fuel I give my body. More than anything, diabetes seems to like consistency! No need to worry about ketones unless your BG is high - very high. Two different things, ketosis and ketoacidosis. The second one is the one that we must avoid at all costs. That can get going after someone hasn't had enough insulin in their system (injected or their own) over a long period so BG has been high, often very high, for a long time. Then the body starts eating itself. Muscle tissue is broken down to produce ketones (which are really an alternative energy so Continue reading >>

Going Keto Part 7: How To Cycle Out Of Keto

Going Keto Part 7: How To Cycle Out Of Keto

Sponsored Content From buying all of the necessary supplies to becoming fully keto-adapted, you've done it all. Keto's been a fun ride and has given you a completely new perspective on the wide world of nutrition for optimal sports performance and health. But let's face it: there are weddings, reunions, and all sorts of social activities that can sometimes make it difficult to stay on a truly ketogenic diet at all times. Sometimes, life simply gets in the way. In this article, we'll outline tips to help you temporarily break ketosis without repercussions, explain the changes in your metabolism that might arise, and show how to slowly transition out of a fat loss phase into a lean mass gaining phase while still staying keto-adapted. Breaking ketosis does not necessarily mean that you are doomed to be out of ketosis indefinitely. In fact, for those of you who have been keto-adapted for an extended period of time, you will find that the longer you have been in ketosis, the easier it will be for you to get back into it after temporarily breaking it. There are some subtle tricks in order for you to break ketosis for a day or two and quickly get back into a fat burning state. Key #1: Break Keto on the Weekends While you can technically break ketosis at any point that you want to, most will find it best to do so on the weekend. Why? Weekends are when the vast majority of social gatherings take place. Weekdays usually mean regimented routines centered around a work day. That makes it easier to stick to a ketogenic diet because you’re in a groove and dialed into your routine. On the weekends, schedules tend to be more open. That makes those glorious two days the perfect time to let loose. So go ahead and enjoy some carbs with your friends and family! Key #2: Keep Your High Car Continue reading >>

Cycling In And Out Of Nutritional Ketosis Is Recommended

Cycling In And Out Of Nutritional Ketosis Is Recommended

Fitness Disclaimer: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only. Vigorous high-intensity exercise is not safe or suitable for everyone. You should consult a physician before beginning a new diet or exercise program and discontinue exercise immediately and consult your physician if you experience pain, dizziness, or discomfort. The results, if any, from the exercises may vary from person-to-person. Engaging in any exercise or fitness program involves the risk of injury. Mercola.com or our panel of fitness experts shall not be liable for any claims for injuries or damages resulting from or connected with the use of this site. Specific questions about your fitness condition cannot be answered without first establishing a trainer-client relationship. Low-fat, high-carb diets prevent healthy mitochondrial function, thereby contributing to chronic diseases such as obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimers, cancer and more Studies suggest low-carb, high-fat diets and eating less frequently may be the answer to the obesity epidemic. The benefits of this type of diet is the primary focus of my book Fat for Fuel, and my complementary online course When your body is able to burn fat for fuel, your liver creates water-soluble fats called ketones that burn far more efficiently than carbs, thus creating far less damaging reactive oxygen species and secondary free radicals Multiday water fasting activates autophagy, allowing your body to clean itself out, and triggers the regeneration of stem cells. Having as little as 200 or 300 calories a day is enough to abort the autophagy process Fasting has been shown to trigger the regeneration of the pancreas in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics a testament to the regenerative power unleashed in your body Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

What mistakes are you making when it comes to your health? I know I’ve been making plenty. That’s why I’m tracking my data in this recent ketosis experiment that I’m doing. What about you? Most people think that the ketogenic diet is just “low-carb” which leads them to make many mistakes that prevent them from not reaping all of the benefits of ketosis that they could. What benefits? How about an improved immune system, increased longevity, lower inflammation, effortless weight loss, decreased hunger, reduced risk for disease and more. Read on to know the top 10 ways that people make mistakes with ketosis and how you can prevent them. 1: Not tracking protein intake By far the biggest problem with a ketogenic diet is not tracking how much protein you are eating. The far majority of people are simply eating too much lean protein, which ends up kicking them out of ketosis. Protein can turn into carbs by a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis, meaning “making new carbs.” This then spikes insulin, and reduces ketone levels. Even though you are eating super low carb, this could make your body switch back and forth between energy systems, which will lead to high levels of fatigue or “low carb flu.” The easiest way to avoid this mistake is by tracking your ketone levels to see how you respond to different amounts and different types of meat. Everyone is different, so the only way you can tell is by tracking. I “listened to my body” before and it didn’t work. I wasn’t in ketosis when I thought I was. I also thought ketosis kind of sucked. It didn’t, I was just wrong. The only way you know is by tracking. If you consume more fat with protein, it will slow this effect. So think fattier cuts of meat, and less muscle meat. But wait, are you going to Continue reading >>

Keto And Fast Food: On The Go

Keto And Fast Food: On The Go

Whether youre out and about and need a quick meal, or you want to go out with family to have a sit-down dinner, you should be able to find low-carb and ketogenic friendly foods at most places. Weve all been there. Youre out running errands on a Saturday afternoon and your tummy growls: its 2 pm and you havent eaten yet! Or its a Tuesday night at a friends house, and they want to grab a meal. What do you do? Luckily, you have plenty of keto fast food and sit-down restaurant options! We have happily eaten my way through the research for you below youll find a look at the most common fast food restaurants in the U.S. and their keto meal options. Here are a few general rules of thumb that you can apply to almost any fast food and sit-down restaurant: Stick to meat, cheese, and vegetables. Most fast food and restaurant places put excess sugar and carbs in their ingredients. Its worth sticking with the simplest ingredients you can find. Avoid the bun. Whether youre ordering a burger from a drive-thru or a table menu, you can opt out of the bun. Typically you can also add in extra sides like avocado, bacon, and sauces if you request it. If you get a salad, read the ingredients. Many salads have leafy greens and berries that are very high in carbs. Its better to stick with simpler salads that include meat and ask for dressing on the side. Many Greek places offer low-carb gyro salads (as long as their meat does not contain filler). Avoid croutons where possible and pick out excess items that are carby from the salads. If its breaded, try to avoid it. Typically chicken wings, mozzarella sticks, and other fried items will have a wheat flour-based breading. If you have no other choice, try to peel off as much of the breading as you possibly can. Pair the now naked meat with a fatt Continue reading >>

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

162 Comments Good morning, folks. With next week’s The Keto Reset Diet release, I’ve got keto on the mind today—unsurprisingly. I’ve had a lot of questions lately on duration. As I’ve mentioned before, a good six weeks of ketosis puts in place all the metabolic machinery for lasting adaptation (those extra mitochondria don’t evaporate if/when you return to traditional Primal eating). But what about the other end of the issue? How long is too long? I don’t do this often, but today I’m reposting an article from a couple of years ago on this very topic. I’ve added a few thoughts based on my recent experience. See what you think, and be sure to share any lingering questions on the question of keto timing and process. I’ll be happy to answer them in upcoming posts and Dear Mark columns. Every day I get links to interesting papers. It’s hard not to when thousands of new studies are published every day and thousands of readers deliver the best ones to my inbox. And while I enjoy thumbing through the links simply for curiosity’s sake, they can also seed new ideas that lead to research rabbit holes and full-fledged posts. It’s probably the favorite part of my day: research and synthesis and the gestation of future blogs. The hard part is collecting, collating, and then transcribing the ideas swirling around inside my brain into readable prose and hopefully getting an article out of it that I can share with you. A while back I briefly mentioned a paper concerning a ketone metabolite known as beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and its ability to block the activity of a set of inflammatory genes. This particular set of genes, known as the NLRP3 inflammasome, has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and age-related macular d Continue reading >>

More in ketosis