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Ideal Ketosis Level For Weight Loss

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The Ketogenic Diet Might Be The Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It?

Here's what you need to know about the high-fat, low-carb diet everyone's talking about. Google has released the top search terms of 2016, and when it comes to weight loss, it turns out folks were especially drawn to the ketogenic diet. It was one of the 10 most-searched diets this year, landing halfway down the list (just a few notches below the taco cleanse!). But if you weren't among the keto-curious in the last 12 months, you're probably wondering now, Is this something I should try? (And what does ketogenic mean again?) Read on for a quick primer on the plan, and my bottom-line advice. What is the ketogenic diet? In a nutshell, it's a high-fat, low- to moderate-protein, low-carb eating plan. On a ketogenic diet, roughly 75% to 90% of daily calories come from fat; 6% to 20% come from protein; and 2% to 5% come from carbohydrates. It was originally devised as a tool for controlling epileptic seizures (though doctors aren't exactly sure how it works) before there were drugs to treat seizures. In the past few decades, it has reemerged as patients and parents seek alternatives to pharmaceuticals. But the ketogenic diet has also been adopted as a weight loss plan. The goal of the di Continue reading >>

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  1. Annik

    Curiosity and a mind with a scientific bent compelled me to buy a Precision Extra ketone blood monitor. I took my first reading this evening before supper. I clocked in at .9. Looking for information on the web, I see:
    Blood ketones are best measured on a fasted stomach in the morning (before breakfast, that is). Here are a few pointers on how to interpret the result:
    Below 0.5 mmol/L is not considered “ketosis”. At this level, you’re far away from maximum fat-burning.
    Between 0.5-1.5 mmol/L is light nutritional ketosis. You’ll be getting a good effect on your weight, but not optimal.
    Around 1.5 – 3 mmol/L is what’s called optimal ketosis and is recommended for maximum weight loss.
    Values of over 3 mmol/L aren’t neccessary. That is, they will achieve neither better nor worse results than being at the 1.5-3 level. Higher values can also sometimes mean that you’re not getting enough food. For type 1 diabetics, it can be caused by a severe lack of insulin.
    I was getting "good returns " on ideal protein until a week or two ago. Now I'm wondering what's caused the pace to slow. Could it be the Mio and Crystal light that I have started to use?
    The information says that blood ketones are best measured in the morning after a night fast. I'm going to repeat the test in the morning and see what happens.
    Does anyone else have experience with this?

  2. lisa32989

    There are other threads re Ketosis & there is a video to watch that explains it

  3. marlenesuer

    I've met many people on this board who have lost an enormous amt of weight - 50lbs, 80lbs, more than 100lbs - none of them using this type of monitor.
    All have just stuck to the plan - that's it - plain and simple.
    I've never personally met Lisa Corner but I do believe she dropped about 200lbs JUST by following the plan.
    Nothing wrong with curiosity at all - that's not what I'm saying - but there's no need whatsoever to over think it. Sticking to the program is all that's needed. Nothing more. IMHO.
    Sure it could be the Mio or Crystal Light - but then what? If that's causing the glitch in progress, the only way to find out is to sop using them for a while and see what happens.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Annik
    Curiosity and a mind with a scientific bent compelled me to buy a precision extra ketone blood monitor.
    I took my first reading this evening before supper. I clocked in at .9. Looking for information on the web, I see:
    Blood ketones are best measured on a fasted stomach in the morning (before breakfast, that is). Here are a few pointers on how to interpret the result:
    Below 0.5 mmol/L is not considered “ketosis”. At this level, you’re far away from maximum fat-burning.
    Between 0.5-1.5 mmol/L is light nutritional ketosis. You’ll be getting a good effect on your weight, but not optimal.
    Around 1.5 – 3 mmol/L is what’s called optimal ketosis and is recommended for maximum weight loss.
    Values of over 3 mmol/L aren’t neccessary. That is, they will achieve neither better nor worse results than being at the 1.5-3 level. Higher values can also sometimes mean that you’re not getting enough food. For type 1 diabetics, it can be caused by a severe lack of insulin.
    I was getting "good returns " on ideal protein until a week or two ago. Now I'm wondering what's caused the pace to slow. Could it be the Mio and Crystal light that I have started to use?
    The information says that blood ketones are best measured in the morning after a night fast. I'm going to repeat the test in the morning and see what happens.
    Does anyone else have experience with this?

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