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Icd 10 Diabetic Retinopathy

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Icd 10 Code For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Severe Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema E11.341

See below for any additional coding requirements that may be necessary. Check for any notations, inclusions and/or exclusions that are specific to this ICD 10 code before using 1 The appropriate 7th character is to be added along with any placeholders (X) necessary to establish a 7-digit ICD 10 code. E11.3411 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E11.3412 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E11.3413 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E11.3419 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema Questions related to E11.341 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema The word 'Includes' appears immediately under certain categories to further define, or give examples of, the content of thecategory. A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes. It means 'NOT CODED HERE!' An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used whe Continue reading >>

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  1. AMZMD

    The human body is in a constant process of maintaining equilibrium. The byproducts of burning fat for energy (ketones) are deposited in the blood for excretion. As the ketones build up in your system, the pH of your blood drops and you become acidotic. As stated above, your body is trying to maintain equilibrium, so it will do certain things to eliminate as much acid from your system as possible, as quickly as possible. One way is to vomit, which dumps huge amounts of H+ instantly. Other reactions are increased respirations to eliminate CO2, as well as dumping the ketones and H+ out through your urine.
    As a side note, the dumping of H+ through urine causes the retention of potassium and you become hyperkalemic (aka "too-much-potassium-emia"). This inhibits myocardial function and can put you into cardiac arrest. This is why extreme no-carb diets are a very bad thing!
    Hope that helps!

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http://www.icd10forkindergarten.com http://www.pacecoding.com

Icd-10 Doesn't Have To Be Intimidating

To help internists become even more comfortable with the new code set, ACP looks at how the codes are structured and how to cross-walk from old to new for some of the most common ones. The idea of a new code set should be familiar by now to internists. To help internists become even more comfortable with ICD-10, this column will answer questions that ACP has received from members by offering examples of the codes for common diagnoses. Q: What are the differences in the structures of ICD-9 versus ICD-10 codes? Are the code numbers random, or do they follow some type of order? A: ICD-10 uses 3 to 7 alphabetic and numeric characters and full code titles, but the format is very similar to that of ICD-9. ICD-10 uses codes that are longer (in some cases) than those of ICD-9, following a basic structure: characters 1-3 will now refer to the code category; characters 4-6 will cover clinical details such as severity, etiology, and anatomic site (among others) and are alphabetic or numeric and character 7 will serve as an extension when necessary and will be either alphabetic or numeric. For illustration, here are a few brief crosswalks from ICD-9 to ICD-10 coding. In ICD-9, headache is cod Continue reading >>

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  1. sharidoto

    HOW MANY DAYS OF STRICK EATING DOES IT NOEMALLY TAKE BEFORE THE STRIPS START TO SHOW YOUR BURNING FAT??
    DREAM,CREATE,INSPIRE AND LOVE YOU HAVE THE PERFECT LIFE !

  2. ljessica0501

    It varies for everyone. For me personally...it took 4 days to register anything and almost 2 weeks to get purple...I have never seen the darkest purple shade. Some people will tell you not to use the sticks, but I like them. My doctor told me to use them 3 times a day for a week to see when my body is the highest. Again...everyone is different. I am highest in the morning, but I hear some people are highest at night.
    Lauren
    Your goals, minus your doubts, equal your reality. - Ralph Marston

  3. PeeFat

    Your body has to burn off all the stored sugar before it goes into ketosis. The shade on the stick should read ' moderate. ' Any higher means you aren't drinking enough water to flush out excess ketones. Too many ketones in your body is unhealthy. So don't think you have to be in the darkest purple range to be eating properly. Also the best time to test is first thing in the morning. Only diabetics need check more than once a day. On atkins we don't even need to use keto sticks. If you follow the rules you will be in ketosis.

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Common Cardiac Diagnosis Codes You Need To Know http://www.cco.us/cco-yt Alicia: Cardiac Diagnosis Codes -- These are I love, diagnosis codes, as many of you already know. But, cardiac diagnosis codes can be a lot of fun. There's some that you should probably just make note of especially if you're working with maybe Medicare patients or patients more likely to have cardiac issues. The ones that I pulled out this time were 414.00, 414.01, 443.9 and 429.2 and 412. These are ones that you could see quite a bit and we've even created a little poll after I talked about to see if you catch the nuances of these codes. Common cardiac codes that you should just be familiar with. The first one, 414.00, coronary atherosclerosis -- this is CAD. If you're not familiar with the abbreviation, when someone says they have CAD, that's what it is. But, what makes this CAD different is this is the one you use after a person's already had a CABG. That means they've had a bypass graft put in. So, think, if somebody's had a CABG, if it's in the medical history or in the chart, then you're going to use 414.00. But, if a person has CAD and they've not had a CABG done before, it's going to be (.01). If they

New Diabetes-related Diagnosis Codes You Need To Know

New diabetes-related diagnosis codes you need to know Ask the Coding Experts, by Doug Morrow, O.D., Harvey Richman, O.D., Rebecca Wartman, O.D. From the November/December 2016 edition of AOA Focus , page 48-49. On Oct. 1, 2016, hundreds of new ICD-10 codes that impact doctors of optometry went into effect. Several additions and revisions have been made in Chapter 4 of the ICD-10 code set (endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases). This chapter includes diabetes-related diagnosis codes. Because doctors of optometry perform the majority of comprehensive, dilated eye examinations for people with diabetes in the United States and are well versed in the treatment and management of diabetic eye disease, it is critical that doctors of optometry are aware of these updated codes. In addition to the diabetes code changes, many other code changes have occurred. Included in this column are just a few of these important changes. New 'code additional' requirements for type II diabetes (E11) The ICD-10 guidelines provide direction on the sequence for reporting certain conditions. The guidelines indicate, "Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifesta Continue reading >>

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  1. QuirkyPixy

    I've been eating almost fully primal since the beginning of August to try to correct some health issues. Before I started my period was completely regular, a 28 day cycle with very little variation each month. My period came normally at the end of August, but my September period came 11 days late in the beginning of October, and my November period hasn't come yet. I also got cystic jawline acne right before the late period, and I don't usually get cysts.
    Is this normal? I thought eating primally is supposed to make hormones more regular, but it seems to be doing something weird to mine. My weight hasn't really changed, so I don't think that is the cause. I'm not pregnant, either.
    I eat eggs, ground beef, lamb chops and neck, chicken, canned salmon and sardines, Kerrygold butter, chard, kale, collards, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, coconut milk and oil, shredded coconut, some baker's chocolate, and berries. I will rarely have a few small Yukon golds or some white rice. Not much else. All of it is organic/free range/grass-fed/whatever. I supplement with 5000 IU of Vit. D, 30mg of zinc, 100 mcg of Selenium, and 400 mg of Magnesium.
    Am I doing something wrong here, or am I being paranoid?

  2. NDF

    A high fat low carb diet can wreck hormonal havoc in some women. Chronic low carb(<100g/day) states can be particularly stressful for some women's bodies.
    What is your exercise like? Even though you state that your weight hasn't really changed, your post doesn't specify, but are you eating with weight loss as a goal? In some women, the "stress" alone of dieting thoughts can alter menstruation.
    Any increased stress in your life?

  3. QuirkyPixy

    Originally posted by NDF
    A high fat low carb diet can wreck hormonal havoc in some women. Chronic low carb(<100g/day) states can be particularly stressful for some women's bodies.
    What is your exercise like? Even though you state that your weight hasn't really changed, your post doesn't specify, but are you eating with weight loss as a goal? In some women, the "stress" alone of dieting thoughts can alter menstruation.
    Any increased stress in your life? Thank you for your reply!
    I get maybe 20g of carbs from berries and probably another 20-30g from veggies per day. I don't intentionally limit them, that's just how it works out; I'm not sure how I could get more carbs in my belly without eating more potatoes and rice, as the veggies fill me up far too quickly. I'm only 94 lbs at 5'1", so weight GAIN is my goal right now. Why does low carb mess with hormones?
    My exercise is a lot of walking; I take public transportation and walk lots to get to bus stops. I also work a fairly active job part time where I'm on my feet all day and lift heavy things at least a few times each shift. Stress is very slightly more than normal, but that hasn't had any real effect on my cycle before. This is puzzling.

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