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Icd-10 Code For Secondary Diabetes Mellitus Due To Pancreatic Malignancy

Pancreatic Cancer: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology

Pancreatic Cancer: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, being responsible for 7% of all cancer-related deaths in both men and women. Approximately 75% of all pancreatic carcinomas occur within the head or neck of the pancreas, 15-20% occur in the body of the pancreas, and 5-10% occur in the tail. See the image below. Pancreatic cancer. Gross section of an adenocarcinoma of the pancreas measuring 5 X 6 cm resected from the pancreatic body and tail. Although the tumor was considered to have been fully resected and had not spread to any nodes, the patient died of recurrent cancer within 1 year. The initial symptoms of pancreatic cancer are often quite nonspecific and subtle in onset. Patients typically report the gradual onset of nonspecific symptoms such as anorexia, malaise, nausea, fatigue, and midepigastric or back pain. Patients with pancreatic cancer may present with the following signs and symptoms: Significant weight loss: Characteristic feature of pancreatic cancer Midepigastric pain: Common symptom of pancreatic cancer, sometimes with radiation of the pain to the midback or lower-back region Often, unrelenting pain: Nighttime pain often a predominant complaint Onset of diabetes mellitus within the previous year Painless obstructive jaundice: Most characteristic sign of cancer of head of the pancreas Pruritus: Often the patient's most distressing symptom Migratory thrombophlebitis (ie, Trousseau sign) and venous thrombosis: May be the first presentation Palpable gallbladder (ie, Courvoisier sign) Developing, advanced intra-abdominal disease: Presence of ascites, a palpable abdominal mass, hepatomegaly from liver metastases, or splenomegaly from portal vein obstruction Advanced disease: Paraumbilical subcutaneous metastases (or Sister Mary Joseph nodule or Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Go to: Prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer Numerous studies have reported the prevalence of diabetes in cancer in general and pancreatic cancer in particular. In studying prevalence, researches have taken a number of different approaches in defining the presence of diabetes in cases of controls. These include physician-recorded diagnosis of diabetes, International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes for diabetes, self-reported diabetes by patients answering a questionnaire, patients on anti-diabetes medicationsa and laboratory records showing elevated fasting blood glucose values and elevated glycosylated hemoglobin values. Few studies have prospectively screened patients for diabetes using glucose tolerance tests or measuring fasting glucose values. The prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer has varied considerably (from 4% to 65%) in reported studies, variability that has largely resulted in ascertainment of diabetes noted above. In retrospective studies of medical records and studies relying on self-reported diabetes, the prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer has varied from 4% to 20%.5 A recently published study using medical records to identify diabetes reported the prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer to be 10% which was no different from that seen in the control non-cancer subjects.6 On the other hand, in studies where patients with pancreatic cancer were prospectively screened for diabetes or where fasting blood glucose data on patients was reviewed, the prevalence of diabetes has been shown to be very high (45% and 75%),7–9 a prevalence many times greater than that reported in the general population. A study by Permert et al.7 using glucose tolerance tests in patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer showed that 75% of patie Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Blood sugar test - blood (Medical Encyclopedia) Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes - keeping active (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - tests and checkups (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - when you are sick (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes and exercise (Medical Encyclopedia) Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia) Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08.9

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08.9

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Blood sugar test - blood (Medical Encyclopedia) Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes - keeping active (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - tests and checkups (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - when you are sick (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes and exercise (Medical Encyclopedia) Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Continue reading >>

Hit220.221 Coding Handbook Chapter 15 - Endocrine, Nutritional And Metabolic Diseases (updated 2017)

Hit220.221 Coding Handbook Chapter 15 - Endocrine, Nutritional And Metabolic Diseases (updated 2017)

HIT220.221 Coding Handbook Chapter 15 - Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases (Updated 2017) Hello, today we're going to start Chapter 15, Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases in our Coding Handbook which corresponds to Chapter 4 in our ICD-10-CM Code Book. This chapter includes diabetes which is probably one of the more common diagnosis you're going to see in the hospital. So we're going to spend quite a bit of time talking about diabetes and different manifestations of that. As a reminder, as you go through the Coding Handbook you're going to see several examples of procedures coding just ignore those. As we've talked about in the past just as a reminder ICD-10-PCS is taught in HIT231. It's a different Code Book, it's a different format. It's a totally different language that you're learning, however, if you do decide that you want to become a coder down the road, you are going to have to know ICD-10-CM, which is this course, ICD-10-PCS which is HIT231 and the CPT Book which is HIT241. All three of those languages, if you will, are on the CCS exam. So, just as a reminder there. As an overview of the types of diabetes that you're going to be coding Type 1, it's often called juvenile diabetes, but it really has nothing to do with the age of the patient. This type of diabetes is "characterized by the body's failure to produce any insulin", so we do not add code Z79.4 for long term use of insulin for patients with a Type 1 diabetes because they need that insulin to stay alive, so, we just assume that they are getting that insulin and it is not coded with a Type 1. Type 2, the body is producing insulin but it's not enough, or what it's producing is not sufficient in quality to be able to manage the glucose in the body. Those patients need the insulin and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Due To Underlying Condition E08- >

Diabetes Mellitus Due To Underlying Condition E08- >

Codes E08 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E08.3 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with ophthalmic complications E08.32 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.33 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.34 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.35 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with proliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.6 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other specified complications K86 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of K86 - other international versions of ICD-10 K86 may differ. Code History 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM) 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes. Continue reading >>

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 249.80 : Secondary Diabetes Mellitus With Other Specified Manifestations, Not Stated As Uncontrolled, Or Unspecified

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 249.80 : Secondary Diabetes Mellitus With Other Specified Manifestations, Not Stated As Uncontrolled, Or Unspecified

Secondary diabetes mellitus with other specified manifestations, not stated as uncontrolled, or unspecified Short description: Sec DM oth nt st uncontr. ICD-9-CM 249.80 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis on a reimbursement claim, however, 249.80 should only be used for claims with a date of service on or before September 30, 2015. For claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, use an equivalent ICD-10-CM code (or codes). You are viewing the 2012 version of ICD-9-CM 249.80. Convert to ICD-10-CM : 249.80 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.618 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other diabetic arthropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.620 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic dermatitis 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.621 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with foot ulcer 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.622 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other skin ulcer 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.628 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other skin complications 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.630 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with periodontal disease 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.638 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other oral complications 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.65 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with hyperglycemia 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.69 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other specified complication 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.618 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with other diabetic arthropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.620 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with diabetic dermatitis 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.621 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with foot ulcer 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.622 Drug or chemical induced diabe Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus coding under ICD-10 will require documentation with greater specificity and detail In order to understand diabetes coding in ICD-10, it’s worth making a comparison of the structural differences between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM. Diabetes mellitus (DM) codes in ICD-10-CM are combination codes that include the type of DM, the body system affected, and the complication affecting that body system as part of the code description. Subcategory levels first specify the type of complication by system, such as diabetes with kidney complications, ophthalmic complications, neurological complications, and circulatory complications. The subclassification level then describes the particular manifestation. For example: E11.3: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications. E11.32: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. E11.321: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema. E11.329: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema. A subcategory for diabetes mellitus with other specified complications is also provided that includes codes for DM with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy, diabetic dermatitis, foot ulcer, other skin ulcer, periodontal disease, hypoglycemia, and hyperglycemia. As many codes as are needed to describe all of the associated complications that the patient has should be assigned from a particular category. Because of this code structure, there is no instructional note found under diabetes mellitus codes in ICD-10-CM requiring an additional code to identify the manifestation since it is already part of the code description. There are specific diabetes codes that do require additional codes in order to identify the ma Continue reading >>

Help With Diagnosis Coding Diabetes

Help With Diagnosis Coding Diabetes

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ & read the forum rules . To view all forums, post or create a new thread, you must be an AAPC Member . If you are a member and have already registered for member area and forum access , you can log in by clicking here . If you've forgotten your username or password use our password reminder tool . To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. How would you code Diabetes Mellitus coma due to malignant neoplasm of the pancreatic duct? I saw this on a test. Would you code 249.30, 157.3 or the other way around 157.3, 249.30? What is the reasoning for your decision? Thank you I would code 249.30, 157.3 because the neoplasm is what caused the diabetic coma so it should be sequenced second. read the diagnosis guidelines for secondary diabetes and sequencing. ICD-9 is different from ICD-10 on this. By [email protected] in forum Medical Coding General Discussion By kmelling in forum Medical Coding General Discussion By kumeena in forum Medical Coding General Discussion AAPC forums are a benefit of membership. Joining AAPC grants you unlimited access, allowing you to post questions and participate with our community of over 150,000 professionals. In addition to full participation on AAPC forums, as a member you will be able to: Access to the largest healthcare job database in the world. Join over 150,000 members of the healthcare network in the world. Be a part of an industry leading organization that drives the business side of healthcare. Save anywhere from 10%-50% with exclusive member discounts on courses, books, study materials, and conferences. Access to discounts at hundreds of restaurants, travel destinations, retail stores, and service providers. AAPC members a Continue reading >>

Icd-10-cm/pcs Coding Handbook Chap 15

Icd-10-cm/pcs Coding Handbook Chap 15

Sort CM Coding / diabetes mellitus - drug-induced or chemical-induced Code 1st: poisoning due to drug or toxin, if applicable, T36 - T65 with 5th or 6th CHAR 1-4 or 6 Code 2nd: from E09.- OR Code 2nd: E09.8, drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with unspecified complications OR Code 2nd: E09.9, drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus without complications Add Code: for adverse effect, if applicable, to identify drug T36 - T50 with 5th or 6th CHAR "5" OR see -- Table of Drugs and Chemicals, by drug, adverse effect/poisoning Add Code: to identify any insulin use Z79.4 CM Coding / RULE: Table of Drugs & Chemicals 1. Do not code directly from the Table of Drugs and Chemicals. Always refer back to the Tabular List. 2. Use as many codes as necessary to describe completely all drugs, medicinal or biological substances. 3. If the same code would describe the causative agent for more than one adverse reaction, poisoning, toxic effect or underdosing, assign the code only once. 4. If two or more drugs, medicinal or biological substances are reported, code each individually unless a combination code is listed in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals. CM Coding / diabetes mellitus - insulin pump - leakage Code 1st: [see mechanical complication - first listed] T85.633-, Leakage of insulin pump NOTE: the appropriate 7th char is to be added to each code from category T38; "A" initial encounter, "D" subsequent encounter, "S" sequela see -- insulin pump - Add Codes [for underdose/overdose, if documented] see -- Table of Drugs and Chemicals, by drug, adverse effect/poisoning [to code the insulin] CM Coding / diabetes mellitus - insulin pump - Add Codes T38.3x6-, Underdose T38.3x1-, Overdose NOTE: the appropriate 7th char is to be added to each code from category T38; "A" initial encou Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer - Wikipedia

Pancreatic Cancer - Wikipedia

Not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, low red meat diet [5] Pancreatic cancer arises when cells in the pancreas , a glandular organ behind the stomach , begin to multiply out of control and form a mass . These cancerous cells have the ability to invade other parts of the body. [10] There are a number of types of pancreatic cancer. [6] The most common, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, accounts for about 85% of cases, and the term "pancreatic cancer" is sometimes used to refer only to that type. [6] These adenocarcinomas start within the part of the pancreas which makes digestive enzymes . [6] Several other types of cancer, which collectively represent the majority of the non-adenocarcinomas, can also arise from these cells. [6] One to two percent of cases of pancreatic cancer are neuroendocrine tumors , which arise from the hormone-producing cells of the pancreas. [6] These are generally less aggressive than pancreatic adenocarcinoma. [6] Signs and symptoms of the most common form of pancreatic cancer may include yellow skin , abdominal or back pain , unexplained weight loss , light-colored stools , dark urine and loss of appetite . [1] There are usually no symptoms in the disease's early stages, and symptoms that are specific enough to suggest pancreatic cancer typically do not develop until the disease has reached an advanced stage. [1] [2] By the time of diagnosis, pancreatic cancer has often spread to other parts of the body. [6] [11] Pancreatic cancer rarely occurs before the age of 40, and more than half of cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma occur in those over 70. [2] Risk factors for pancreatic cancer include tobacco smoking , obesity , diabetes , and certain rare genetic conditions. [2] About 25% of cases are linked to smoking, [3] and 510% are linked to inherit Continue reading >>

Wear Your Detective Hat For Postpancreatectomy Diabetes Mellitus

Wear Your Detective Hat For Postpancreatectomy Diabetes Mellitus

Wear Your Detective Hat for Postpancreatectomy Diabetes Mellitus Following guidelines and asking questions are key to solving the T3cDM coding mystery. One guideline in ICD-10-CM consistently overlooked is I.C.4.a.6.b.i., which is specific to secondary diabetes mellitus due to a pancreatectomy. I.C.4.a.6.b.i. Secondary diabetes mellitus due to a pancreatectomy For postpancreatectomy diabetes mellitus (lack of insulin due to the surgical removal of all or part of the pancreas), assign code E89.1, Postprocedural hypoinsulinemia. Assign a code from category E13 and a code from subcategory Z90.41-, Acquired absence of pancreas, as additional codes. This guideline prompts a number of questions that must be answered before a thorough understanding can be attained. Why is this type of diabetes assigned to category E13 rather than category E08? E08 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition You may argue absence of some or the entire pancreas would be an underlying condition and that is correct. But if you look at how the categories of diabetes are divided in ICD-10-CM, you find category E13 pulls several underlying conditions out from category E08. Specifically, if the underlying condition is genetic (affecting beta-cell function or insulin action), surgical, or a condition not included in another category, it is coded to category E13. This understanding prompts two more questions: Why is postpancreatectomy diabetes mellitus included in category E13? What specifically makes this type of diabetes different from the other categories? According to Managing Diabetes and Hyperglycemia in the Hospital Setting, A Clinicians Guide (B. Draznin), postpancreatectomy diabetes mellitus is classified, along with a few other conditions, into its own type of diabetes mellitus, commonly re Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes: Time To Look At The Coding Guidelines Again

Coding Diabetes: Time To Look At The Coding Guidelines Again

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, prompting coders to review the coding guidelines for this disease suffered by more than 10.9 million U.S. residents. During November, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is raising awareness about diabetes, diabetic eye disease, the importance of early disease detection, and related preventive health services covered by Medicare. According to the CMS website, diabetes can lead to severe complications such as heart disease, stroke, vision loss, kidney disease, nerve damage, and amputation, among others, and it’s a significant risk factor for developing glaucoma. People with diabetes are more susceptible to many other illnesses such as pneumonia and influenza and are more likely to die from these than people who do not have diabetes. Among U.S. residents 65 years and older, 10.9 million (26.9 percent) had diabetes in 2010. Currently, 3.6 million Americans 40 and older suffer from diabetic eye disease. Education and early detection are major components to combating this disease. Let’s take a look at the coding guidelines for diabetes to ensure that we accurately select and capture the ICD-10-CM code(s) for this disease. As all health information management (HIM) coding professionals know (or should know), the ICD-10-CM Official Coding and Reporting Guidelines have been approved by the four organizations that make up the Cooperating Parties for ICD-10: the American Hospital Association (AHA), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). These official coding guidelines are organized into four sections. Section I includes the structure and conventions of the classification and general guidel Continue reading >>

Coding Guidelines For Diabetes Under Icd-10 | Acdis Blog

Coding Guidelines For Diabetes Under Icd-10 | Acdis Blog

Book Excerpt: Coding guidelines for diabetes under ICD-10 The age of a patient is not the sole determining factor for the type of diabetes, although most Type 1 diabetics develop the condition before reaching puberty. For this reason, Type 1 diabetes mellitus is also referred to as juvenile diabetes. If the physician does not document the type of diabetes mellitus in the medical record, the default category of codes is E11 (type 2 diabetes mellitus). If the physician does not document the type of diabetes but does indicate that the patient uses insulin, assign a code from category E11; also report code Z79.4, long term (current use insulin to indicate that the patient uses insulin. Do not report code Z79.4 if a Type 2 patient is given insulin temporarily to bring his or her blood sugar under control during an encounter. In situations where diabetes occurs during pregnancy and for cases of gestational diabetes, refer to the ICD-10 Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting Section I.C.15, Diabetes mellitus in pregnancy and gestational (pregnancy-induced) diabetes. The codes under category E08 (diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition) and E09 (drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus) identify complications/manifestations associated with secondary diabetes mellitus. Secondary diabetes is always caused by another condition of event (e.g., cystic fibrosis, malignant neoplasm of pancreas, pancreatectomy, adverse effect of drugs, poisoning.) The sequencing of the secondary diabetes codes in relation to codes for the cause of the diabetes is based on the tabular instructions for categories E08 and E09. For category E08, first code the underlying condition. For category E09 first code the drug or chemical (T36-T65). For a patient with diabetes ketoacidosis without co Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Results of a recent coding and clinical documentation pilot study indicate that the ICD-10-CM coding classification changes made for diabetes mellitus have significantly improved coding for this disease. The results of the study noted that although a few ICD-10-CM "unspecified" diabetes codes were assigned, the majority of the diabetes codes sufficiently captured the diagnoses as expressed in the clinical documentation. In addition, the pilot study noted that the ICD-10-CM diabetes codes complement present medical science-separate type 1 and type 2 diabetes category codes and body system combination codes are a major improvement over ICD-9-CM. Instead of classifying as controlled or uncontrolled, ICD-10-CM classifies inadequately controlled, out of control, and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus by type with hyperglycemia. This article highlights key ICD-10-CM features for diabetes mellitus coding. In ICD-10-CM, chapter 4, "Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E89)," includes a separate subchapter (block), Diabetes mellitus E08-E13, with the categories: E08, Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E09, Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus E10, Type 1 diabetes mellitus E11, Type 2 diabetes mellitus E13, Other specified diabetes mellitus The diabetes mellitus categories E08–E13 are further subdivided into four- or five-character subcategories. When a category has been subdivided into four-, five-, or six-character codes, the diabetes code assigned represents the highest level of specificity within ICD-10-CM. ICD-10-CM Tabular Instructional Notes Diabetes mellitus tabular inclusions notes are introduced by the term "Includes" and appear at the beginning of a category. Categories E10–E13 inclusion notes further define or provide examples of th Continue reading >>

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