diabetestalk.net

Icd 10 Code For Secondary Diabetes Mellitus

Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 249.60 : Secondary Diabetes Mellitus With Neurological Manifestations, Not Stated As Uncontrolled, Or Unspecified

Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 249.60 : Secondary Diabetes Mellitus With Neurological Manifestations, Not Stated As Uncontrolled, Or Unspecified

Secondary diabetes mellitus with neurological manifestations, not stated as uncontrolled, or unspecified ICD-9-CM 249.60 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis on a reimbursement claim, however, 249.60 should only be used for claims with a date of service on or before September 30, 2015. For claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, use an equivalent ICD-10-CM code (or codes). Convert to ICD-10-CM : 249.60 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.40 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.41 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic mononeuropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.42 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic polyneuropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.43 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic autonomic (poly)neuropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.44 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic amyotrophy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.49 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other diabetic neurological complication 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.610 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.40 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.41 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications with diabetic mononeuropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.42 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications with diabetic polyneuropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.43 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications with diabetic autonomic (poly)neuropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.44 Drug or ch Continue reading >>

Icd-10: Cull Through Your Choices For Diabetic Neuropathy Diagnoses

Icd-10: Cull Through Your Choices For Diabetic Neuropathy Diagnoses

ICD-9 had a lot of options, but ICD-10 has even more. If your physician treats a patient diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy, be prepared to have numerous ICD-10 code choices for your claim. Also be prepared to look for documentation regarding the type of diabetes the patient has, as this can lead you to shift from one group of codes to another. ICD-9 included numerous code choices for patients with diabetic neuropathy. Some common examples were: 249.6 – Secondary diabetes mellitus with neurological manifestation 250.60 – Diabetes with neurological manifestations, type II or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled 250.61 – Diabetes with neurological manifestations, type I [juvenile type], not stated as uncontrolled 250.62 – Diabetes with neurological manifestations, type II or unspecified type, uncontrolled 250.63 – Diabetes with neurological manifestations, type I [juvenile type], uncontrolled 250.6 – Diabetes with neurological manifestations 357.2 – Polyneuropathy in diabetes. Now that you’re coding with ICD-10, your options are much greater. Neurologic complications are identified by the fourth character of “4.” Various Medicare administrators have their own lists of approved primary diagnostic codes for diabetic patients, but a few of the generally approved codes/code families are: E08.4~ – Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic neuropathy E08.42 – Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic polyneuropathy E09.4~ -- Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications E09.42 – Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with neurological complications with diabetic polyneuropathy E10.4~ -- Type 1 diabetes mellitus with neurological complications E10.42 – Type 1 diabetes mellitu Continue reading >>

2017/18 Icd-10-cm Codes E13*: Other Specified Diabetes Mellitus

2017/18 Icd-10-cm Codes E13*: Other Specified Diabetes Mellitus

E10.1 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis E10.10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis wi... E10.11 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis wi... E10.2 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with kidney complica... E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephro... E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chroni... E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ... E10.3 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic comp... E10.31 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.32 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.321 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3211 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3212 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3213 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3219 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.329 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3291 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3292 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3293 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3299 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.33 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.331 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3312 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3313 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.339 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3391 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3392 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3393 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Version:2016

Icd-10 Version:2016

Quick search helps you quickly navigate to a particular category. It searches only titles, inclusions and the index and it works by starting to search as you type and provide you options in a dynamic dropdown list. You may use this feature by simply typing the keywords that you're looking for and clicking on one of the items that appear in the dropdown list. The system will automatically load the item that you've picked. You may use wildcards '*' as well to find similar words or to simply save some typing. For example, tuber* confirmed will hit both tuberculosis and tuberculous together with the word 'confirmed' If you need to search other fields than the title, inclusion and the index then you may use the advanced search feature You may also use ICD codes here in order to navigate to a known ICD category. The colored squares show from where the results are found. (green:Title, blue:inclusions, orange:index, red:ICD code) You don't need to remeber the colors as you may hover your mouse on these squares to read the source. Continue reading >>

2018 Icd-10 Update Part 3: New Codes For Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st

2018 Icd-10 Update Part 3: New Codes For Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st

2018 ICD-10 Update Part 3: New Codes for Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st | 2018 ICD-10 Update Part 3: New Codes for Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st September 28, 2017 | Rhonda Buckholtz, CPC, CPCI, CPMA, CDEO, CRC, CHPSE, COPC, CENTC, CPEDC, CGSC, VP of Practice Optimization, Eye Care Leaders Like most eye care practices, you likely treat patients with co-morbid conditions. The patient population of many practices is often older than average, and many times chronically ill. So, correctly coding for co-morbidity is essential in avoiding costly revenue leaks that could drain cash from your practice. Recent studies have shown that the number of type 2 patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis has been increasing, and thats one reason for the new DKA codes. Prior to the 2018 revisions, the best coding option to describe a patient with type 2 DKA was E11.69 (Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other specified complication). Beginning October 1, 2017, youll see a new subdivision among the E11 (Type 2 diabetes mellitus) codes: E11.1 (Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis). This new subdivision includes two codes: Other DKA-related additions occur in the following code series: E08 (Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition) E09 (Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus) E13 (Other specified diabetes mellitus ) All four series contain XXX.1 ( with ketoacidosis) as a subdivision containing two codes: Updates for Coding Medical Management of Diabetes General guidelines for coding diabetes mellitus and secondary diabetes mellitus instruct coders how to report the medical management of diabetes. TheICD-10-CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting are available here .Youll find the first revisions in bold under Chapter 4.a.1, Diabetes mellitus and the use of in Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes: Time To Look At The Coding Guidelines Again

Coding Diabetes: Time To Look At The Coding Guidelines Again

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, prompting coders to review the coding guidelines for this disease suffered by more than 10.9 million U.S. residents. During November, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is raising awareness about diabetes, diabetic eye disease, the importance of early disease detection, and related preventive health services covered by Medicare. According to the CMS website, diabetes can lead to severe complications such as heart disease, stroke, vision loss, kidney disease, nerve damage, and amputation, among others, and it’s a significant risk factor for developing glaucoma. People with diabetes are more susceptible to many other illnesses such as pneumonia and influenza and are more likely to die from these than people who do not have diabetes. Among U.S. residents 65 years and older, 10.9 million (26.9 percent) had diabetes in 2010. Currently, 3.6 million Americans 40 and older suffer from diabetic eye disease. Education and early detection are major components to combating this disease. Let’s take a look at the coding guidelines for diabetes to ensure that we accurately select and capture the ICD-10-CM code(s) for this disease. As all health information management (HIM) coding professionals know (or should know), the ICD-10-CM Official Coding and Reporting Guidelines have been approved by the four organizations that make up the Cooperating Parties for ICD-10: the American Hospital Association (AHA), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). These official coding guidelines are organized into four sections. Section I includes the structure and conventions of the classification and general guidel Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus coding under ICD-10 will require documentation with greater specificity and detail In order to understand diabetes coding in ICD-10, it’s worth making a comparison of the structural differences between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM. Diabetes mellitus (DM) codes in ICD-10-CM are combination codes that include the type of DM, the body system affected, and the complication affecting that body system as part of the code description. Subcategory levels first specify the type of complication by system, such as diabetes with kidney complications, ophthalmic complications, neurological complications, and circulatory complications. The subclassification level then describes the particular manifestation. For example: E11.3: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications. E11.32: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. E11.321: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema. E11.329: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema. A subcategory for diabetes mellitus with other specified complications is also provided that includes codes for DM with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy, diabetic dermatitis, foot ulcer, other skin ulcer, periodontal disease, hypoglycemia, and hyperglycemia. As many codes as are needed to describe all of the associated complications that the patient has should be assigned from a particular category. Because of this code structure, there is no instructional note found under diabetes mellitus codes in ICD-10-CM requiring an additional code to identify the manifestation since it is already part of the code description. There are specific diabetes codes that do require additional codes in order to identify the ma Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Results of a recent coding and clinical documentation pilot study indicate that the ICD-10-CM coding classification changes made for diabetes mellitus have significantly improved coding for this disease. The results of the study noted that although a few ICD-10-CM "unspecified" diabetes codes were assigned, the majority of the diabetes codes sufficiently captured the diagnoses as expressed in the clinical documentation. In addition, the pilot study noted that the ICD-10-CM diabetes codes complement present medical science-separate type 1 and type 2 diabetes category codes and body system combination codes are a major improvement over ICD-9-CM. Instead of classifying as controlled or uncontrolled, ICD-10-CM classifies inadequately controlled, out of control, and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus by type with hyperglycemia. This article highlights key ICD-10-CM features for diabetes mellitus coding. In ICD-10-CM, chapter 4, "Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E89)," includes a separate subchapter (block), Diabetes mellitus E08-E13, with the categories: E08, Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E09, Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus E10, Type 1 diabetes mellitus E11, Type 2 diabetes mellitus E13, Other specified diabetes mellitus The diabetes mellitus categories E08–E13 are further subdivided into four- or five-character subcategories. When a category has been subdivided into four-, five-, or six-character codes, the diabetes code assigned represents the highest level of specificity within ICD-10-CM. ICD-10-CM Tabular Instructional Notes Diabetes mellitus tabular inclusions notes are introduced by the term "Includes" and appear at the beginning of a category. Categories E10–E13 inclusion notes further define or provide examples of th Continue reading >>

Palm Sugar Syrup Buy

Palm Sugar Syrup Buy

Great for Preventing and Treating Diabetes. Palm Sugar Syrup Buy my Account Wish List Sign Out Sign In. They may sometimes arise in the small intestine as well. Thank you for shopping for diabetic supplies including blood glucose test strips blood glucose monitors diabetic insulin syringes diabetic lancets and skin care ICD-9-CM to ICD-10 Common Codes for Endocrinology ICD-9 Code Diagnoses ICD-10 276.2 Alcohol ketoacidosis E87.2 Diabetes Mellitus 249.00 Secondary diabetes Pediatric Endocrinology Learning to Control After-Meal High Blood Sugars 3 pizza spinners menu Disclaimer: This document is for informational purposes only and is not Although often overlooked the obesity epidemic is related to excessive sugar consumption and this is also a major driving factor to an increased cancer risk. Humalog memoir insulin pendefinition of type 1 diabetes mellitusketosis diabetes diet Test Out. INTRODUCTION The EvenCare G3 Blood Glucose Monitoring System consists of a glucose meter and test strips. Here we take a look at its causes symptoms and prevention. The new diabetes foot assessment tool has now been launched for primary care staff to use at annual medtronic-diabetes.co.uk similar sites medtronic-diabetes.co.uk competitors websites with similar topics as medtronic-diabetes.co.uk. Hoffman L Nolan C Wilson JD Oats JJ Simmons D: Gestational diabetes melli-tus-management guidelines: the Aus-tralasian Diabetes in Pregnancy Society. Ive never had a problem before The Effects Drinking Alcohol On An Empty Stomach Have On Your Body. SAMPLE SECTION 504 PLAN 4.3 The parent/guardian will supply 5.3 Responsible school staff members will make sure that the students blood glucose meter As the role of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and thyrid dysfunctions in the Journal of Diabetes Osteoporosis B Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus E11- >

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus E11- >

A disease in which the body does not control the amount of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood and the kidneys make a large amount of urine. This disease occurs when the body does not make enough insulin or does not use it the way it should. A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. A metabolic disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels due to diminished production of insulin or insulin resistance/desensitization. A subclass of diabetes mellitus that is not insulin-responsive or dependent (niddm). It is characterized initially by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia; and eventually by glucose intolerance; hyperglycemia; and overt diabetes. Type ii diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop ketosis but often exhibit obesity. A type of diabetes mellitus that is characterized by insulin resistance or desensitization and increased blood glucose levels. This is a chronic disease that can develop gradually over the life of a patient and can be linked to both environmental factors and heredity. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood.over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestati Continue reading >>

Icd-10-cm Diabetes Diag Codes

Icd-10-cm Diabetes Diag Codes

The discharge ICD-10-CM codes included in this spreadsheet are acceptable for use to answer "YES" to "Diabetes Mellitus" to complete the NHSN Operative Procedure Details. The definition excludes patients who receive insulin for perioperative control of hyperglycemia but have no diagnosis of diabetes. (reviewed 11012016) ICD-10-CM DIABETES DIAGNOSES CODES DESCRIPTIONS E10.10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma E10.11 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with coma E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephropathy E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chronic kidney disease E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic kidney complication E10.311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.321 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.329 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.331 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.339 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.341 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.349 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.351 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.359 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.36 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract E10.39 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ophthalmic Continue reading >>

Icd-10, Part 4: How To Code For Diabetic Retinopathy

Icd-10, Part 4: How To Code For Diabetic Retinopathy

Written By: Elizabeth Cottle, CPC, OCS, Rajiv R. Rathod, MD, MBA, Sue Vicchrilli, COT, OCS, and E. Joy Woodke, COE, OCS Finding the ICD-10 codes for diabetic retinopathy can be tricky. They are not listed in Chapter 7, Diseases of the Eye and Adnexa (H00-H59), but are in the diabetes section (E08-E13) of Chapter 4, Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases. Retinal complications. To further confuse matters, the most common retinal complications are in Chapter 7, not Chapter 4. Examples include vitreous hemorrhage (H43.1-), traction detachment of retina (H33.4-), and rubeosis iridis (H21.1-). New options. ICD-10 features codes for diagnoses that don’t currently have codes. These include drug- or chemical-induced diabetes mellitus (E09.-); gestational diabetes (Q24.4-); neonatal diabetes mellitus (P70.2); and postpancreatectomy, postprocedural, or secondary diabetes mellitus (E13.-). Changes in Documentation Some terms that you’re using in charts—such as “NIDDM,” “controlled,” and “uncontrolled”—will be obsolete when ICD-10 starts on Oct. 1, 2015. Instead, diabetes documentation should address the following questions: Is it type 1 or type 2? Is there diabetic retinopathy? If so, is it proliferative or nonproliferative? If nonproliferative, is it mild, moderate, or severe? Is there macular edema? Preparedness tips. To help you work through that series of questions, the AAOE has developed a decision tree that you can laminate and keep for reference at the coder’s desk. Download it at www.aao.org/icd10. You also should update your intake form so that staff can capture the type of diabetes. Insulin use? Submit Z79.4 as supporting documentation indicating any insulin use. What’s the Underlying Condition? According to ICD-10 instructions, physicians Continue reading >>

A Closer Look: Documentation And Coding For Diabetes Diagnoses

A Closer Look: Documentation And Coding For Diabetes Diagnoses

In last month’s Blue Review, we took a closer look at documentation and coding for pulmonary diagnoses as part of our effort to provide more information that may help with the transition to ICD-10, Risk Adjustment and more. This month, we look at diabetes, a group of metabolic diseases that includes chronic and short-term conditions such as diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. The conditions that fall under this category can sometimes be asystematic and other times can develop complications. It is imperative that documentation is specific and accurate to facilitate accurate, complete and compliant diagnosis code assignment. On October 1, 2014, the health care industry will transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS for diagnoses and inpatient procedure coding. It is essential to take note of the key differences in coding in ICD-9-CM versus the ICD-10-CM/PCS code sets. The goal of this article is to review documentation and diagnosis coding for conditions that fall under the diabetes umbrella to achieve accurate and compliant practices. Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease in which the body fails to properly produce or use insulin. Diabetes mellitus is divided into two categories: Type 1, insulin-dependent DM (IDDM), previously referred to as “juvenile diabetes,” and Type 2, non-insulin-dependent DM (NIDDM) previously referred to as “adult-onset diabetes.” ICD-9-CM code structure classifies diabetes into a single code category, 250. Accurate code assignment required determination of specific fourth- and fifth-digit sub-classifications. The fourth digit provides details regarding the presence of manifestations or complications due to diabetes, while the fifth digit indicates whether the diabetes is controlled or Continue reading >>

Icd-9-cm Vs. Icd-10-cm: Examine The Differences In Diabetes Coding

Icd-9-cm Vs. Icd-10-cm: Examine The Differences In Diabetes Coding

Most coders can quickly come up with 250.00. And if the physician only documented diabetes mellitus, that’s the correct ICD-9-CM code. If a physician doesn’t document complications or type of diabetes, coders default to code 250.00 (diabetes mellitus without mention of complications), says Jill Young, CPC, CEDC, CIMC, president of Young Medical Consulting, LLC, in East Lansing, MI. However, 250.00 is not necessarily the best code to describe the patient’s actual condition. Consider these two patients. Patient A is a type 2 diabetic with well controlled diabetes. Patient B is a type 2 diabetic with uncontrolled diabetes who also suffers from diabetes-related chronic kidney disease. If the physician documents “diabetes mellitus” for both patients, coders would report the same code, even though the patients have very different conditions. The physician loses reimbursement on Patient B, who is sicker and requires more care, Young says. Coding in ICD-9-CM When it comes to the code assignment for diabetes mellitus in ICD-9-CM (250 code series), coders identify whether the diabetes is type 1or 2 using a fifth digit, says Shannon E. McCall, RHIA, CCS, CCS-P, CPC, CPC-I, CEMC, CCDS, director of HIM/coding for HCPro, Inc., in Danvers, Mass, and an AHIMA-approved ICD-10-CM/PCS trainer. If the diabetes is secondary, coders choose from codes in the 249 series. Under series 250, coders will find 10 different subcategories that further define and refine the patient’s actual condition. All of those codes require a fifth digit to indicate whether the diabetes is controlled or uncontrolled, type 1or type 2. The fifth digit subclassifications are: Coders also need to note that codes 250.4, 250.5, 250.6, 250.7, and 250.8 all include instructions to use an additional code to ide Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08.9

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08.9

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Blood sugar test - blood (Medical Encyclopedia) Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes - keeping active (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - tests and checkups (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - when you are sick (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes and exercise (Medical Encyclopedia) Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Continue reading >>

More in ketosis