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Icd 10 Code For Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus With Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus With Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema - E10.351 See: Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy Back to E10.35 ICD-10 Code for Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.351 E10.351 is a valid1 ICD 10 diagnosis code. E10.351 is NOT valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions. See below ↓ Chapter 4 Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E89) Section E08-E13 Diabetes mellitus (E08-E13) Category E10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus google_ad_client="ca-pub-1814926481161688";google_ad_slot="9344397369";google_ad_format="734x90_0ads_al";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_ad_width=734;google_ad_height=90;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=10;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["38893303","21061122","191880502"],"loeids":["38893313"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=false;google_ad_unit_key="3481760299";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="1195395224";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=2;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_1";google_start_time=1514617658980;google_pub_vars="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 Continue reading >>

New Diabetes-related Diagnosis Codes You Need To Know

New Diabetes-related Diagnosis Codes You Need To Know

Ask the Coding Experts, by Doug Morrow, O.D., Harvey Richman, O.D., Rebecca Wartman, O.D. From the November/December 2016 edition of AOA Focus, page 48-49. On Oct. 1, 2016, hundreds of new ICD-10 codes that impact doctors of optometry went into effect. Several additions and revisions have been made in Chapter 4 of the ICD-10 code set (endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases). This chapter includes diabetes-related diagnosis codes. Because doctors of optometry perform the majority of comprehensive, dilated eye examinations for people with diabetes in the United States and are well versed in the treatment and management of diabetic eye disease, it is critical that doctors of optometry are aware of these updated codes. In addition to the diabetes code changes, many other code changes have occurred. Included in this column are just a few of these important changes. New 'code additional' requirements for type II diabetes (E11) The ICD-10 guidelines provide direction on the sequence for reporting certain conditions. The guidelines indicate, "Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a 'use additional code' note at the etiology code and a 'code first' note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation." For type II diabetes (E11), the "use additional" instructions have changed. Previously physicians were guided to use an additional code to identify any insulin use (Z798.4). As of Oct. 1, 2016, physicians have Continue reading >>

Icd-10-cm Diabetes Diag Codes

Icd-10-cm Diabetes Diag Codes

The discharge ICD-10-CM codes included in this spreadsheet are acceptable for use to answer "YES" to "Diabetes Mellitus" to complete the NHSN Operative Procedure Details. The definition excludes patients who receive insulin for perioperative control of hyperglycemia but have no diagnosis of diabetes. (reviewed 11012016) ICD-10-CM DIABETES DIAGNOSES CODES DESCRIPTIONS E10.10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma E10.11 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with coma E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephropathy E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chronic kidney disease E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic kidney complication E10.311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.321 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.329 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.331 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.339 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.341 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.349 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.351 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.359 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.36 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract E10.39 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ophthalmic Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E11.311

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E11.311

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes type 2 - meal planning (Medical Encyclopedia) Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia) Type 2 diabetes - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Continue reading >>

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 362.04 : Mild Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 362.04 : Mild Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy Short description: Mild nonprolf db retnoph. ICD-9-CM 362.04 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis on a reimbursement claim, however, 362.04 should only be used for claims with a date of service on or before September 30, 2015. For claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, use an equivalent ICD-10-CM code (or codes). You are viewing the 2012 version of ICD-9-CM 362.04. Convert to ICD-10-CM : 362.04 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E11.329 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema DM 1 w mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy DM 1 w mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy w macular edema DM 2 w mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy DM 2 w mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy w macular edema Drug induced diabetes with mild retinopathy Drug induced DM w mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy Drug induced DM w mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy w macular edema Mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy Mild non-proliferative retinopathy due to secondary diabetes mellitus Mild nonproliferative retinopathy due to type 1 diabetes mellitus Mild nonproliferative retinopathy due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Mild nonproliferative retinopathy with macular edema due to drug induced diabetes mellitus Mild non-proliferative retinopathy with macular edema due to secondary diabetes mellitus Mild nonproliferative retinopathy with macular edema due to type 1 diabetes mellitus Mild nonproliferative retinopathy with macular edema due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Mild nonproliferative retinopathy without macular edema due to drug induced diabetes mellitus Secondary DM w mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopat Continue reading >>

Top 85 Retina Diagnosis Codes

Top 85 Retina Diagnosis Codes

Note: A dash (-) at the end of a code indicates that more characters are required (eg, laterality, stage, severity). See legend for appropriate digits. ICD-9 Code Descriptor ICD-10 Code Descriptor Coding Considerations 115.02* Infection by Histoplasma capsulatum, retinitis B39.4 Histoplasmosis capsulati, unspecified Report both codes; Report and document Associated AIDS (B20) H32 Chorioretinal disorders in diseases classified elsewhere 130.2 Chorioretinitis due to toxoplasmosis B58.01 Toxoplasma chorioretinitis 190.6 Malignant neoplasm of choroid C69.3- Malignant neoplasm of choroid Code laterality; No bilateral code 224.6 Benign neoplasm of choroid D31.3- Benign neoplasm of choroid Code laterality; No bilateral code 250.00 Diabetes mellitus without mention of complication, type II or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled E11.9 Type 2 diabetes mellitus without complications 250.50** Diabetes with ophthalmic manifestations, type II or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled E11.3- Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic retinopathy Code and document: Type, retinopathy, proliferative, nonproliferative severity, and edema; Document laterality E11.36 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract E11.39 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ophthalmic complication 250.52** Diabetes with ophthalmic manifestations, type II or unspecified type, uncontrolled E11.3- Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic retinopathy Code and document: Type, retinopathy, proliferative, nonproliferative severity, and edema; Document laterality E11.36 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract E11.39 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ophthalmic complication 360.01 Acute endophthalmitis H44.00- Unspecified purulent endophthalmitis Code laterality 360.21 Progressive Continue reading >>

Icd-10-cm Code E11.351 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

Icd-10-cm Code E11.351 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

Type 2 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema Billable codes are sufficient justification for admission to an acute care hospital when used a principal diagnosis. E11.351 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema. A 'billable code' is detailed enough to be used to specify a medical diagnosis. The ICD code E113 is used to code Diabetic retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ([rtnpi]), also known as diabetic eye disease, is when damage occurs to the retina due to diabetes. It can eventually lead to blindness. Image of fundus showing scatter laser surgery for diabetic retinopathy DRG Group #008 - Simultaneous pancreas or kidney transplant. DRG Group #124-125 - Other disorders of the eye with MCC. DRG Group #124-125 - Other disorders of the eye without MCC. Proliferative retinopathy with retinal edema due to type 2 diabetes mellitus (disorder) Consider additional code to identify specific condition or disease ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index References for 'E11.351 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema' The ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index links the below-listed medical terms to the ICD code E11.351. Click on any term below to browse the alphabetical index. Continue reading >>

Top Icd-10-cm Changes: Diabetes, Glaucoma And Macular Degeneration

Top Icd-10-cm Changes: Diabetes, Glaucoma And Macular Degeneration

On October 1, 2016, changes to ICD-10-CM coding were implemented. While all of the code changes applicable for optometry are important, a few of the major changes are discussed in this article. Diabetic Ocular Complication Codes The first major change in ICD-10-CM codes for 2017 is for diabetic ocular complication coding. All of the DM retinopathy code choices will now specify which eye is impacted. Several new codes for proliferative diabetic retinopathy were also added. Note that a code for oral diabetic medication use (Z79.84) was added and should be used when applicable. The existing code to designate insulin use (Z79.4) was retained. Keep in mind that not all injectable diabetic medications are considered insulin. If a patient is on both oral medication and insulin, both of these medication codes should be used. The new codes for diabetic retinopathy apply to all the code categories, but only the E11.3 code section is detailed in this article so be sure to review the other categories if you are using them for any particular patient. The other categories include E08.3, E09.3, and E10.3. E11.3 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications All of the subcategories under E11.3, with two exceptions, will require a 7th character to indicate which eye had retinopathy. One exception is E11.36 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract. The other exception is E11.39 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ophthalmic complication, but this code does require the use of an additional code to further describe the complication. The ICD-10-CM tabular listing for each of the following subcategories will require the following 7th character to be added as indicated by this statement under each subcategory: E11.32, E11.33, E11.34, and E11.35. As an example, all of Continue reading >>

New Icd-10 Codes For Diabetic Retinopathy And Amd

New Icd-10 Codes For Diabetic Retinopathy And Amd

Written By: Sue Vicchrilli, COT, OCS, Academy Director of Coding and Reimbursement, and Jenny Edgar, CPC, CPCO, OCS, Academy Coding Specialist On Oct. 1, thousands of new and revised ICD-10 codes go into effect, including 368 that are relevant to ophthalmology. This article focuses on changes to the diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) codes. Diabetic Retinopathy When ICD-10 launched in 2015, one of the biggest learning curves involved coding for diabetic retinopathy. If you aced that challenge, congratulations—but don’t relax. This year’s changes involve further restructuring of the diabetic retinopathy codes. Laterality. Previously in ICD-10, the diabetic retinopathy codes were not identified by eye. That has now changed. Starting on Oct. 1, 2016, you will indicate laterality with a 1 (right eye), 2 (left eye), or 3 (bilateral) in the seventh position (see the red numerals in Tables 1 and 2). Staging for PDR. The proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) codes now identify stage in the sixth position (see the green numerals in Table 2). Some aspects of these codes have stayed the same. Type 1 diabetes codes still start with E10, and type 2 with E11. Like last year, coding for nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) involves categorizing the diagnosis as mild, moderate, or severe and indicating whether or not macular edema is present (see Table 1). And you still use the same codes to indicate diabetes mellitus with no complications—E10.9 for type 1 and E11.9 for type 2—and those 2 codes don’t have laterality. AMD Prior to Oct 1, 2016, whether AMD was staged as wet (H35.32) or dry (H35.31), the ICD-10 codes didn’t specify eye. After Oct. 1, laterality is required when coding for AMD, in addition to staging. Unlike diabetes, t Continue reading >>

Icd-10-cm And Cpt Changes In 2017

Icd-10-cm And Cpt Changes In 2017

November/ December 2016 ICD-10-CM CHANGES The proliferation of International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) codes for 2017 is especially relevant for retina practices, particularly the codes found in Chapter 4.1 New diagnosis codes should be in use now (started October 1), and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has stated that they should be used from October 1 through September 30, 2017. Codes that do not change will continue to be used going forward. CMS was lenient in 2016 in allowing the use of codes with the description unspecified. In ICD-10-CM jargon, unspecified means the laterality or specificity of the diagnosis was not noted in the chart, not that it is unspecified clinically. Practices can expect claim denials if unspecified codes continue to be used. Codes that are more helpful are now in the book, but they are not necessarily where you would expect to find them. For example, codes for combined traction and rhegmatogenous retinal detachments can be found in Chapter 4 (Endocrine, Nutritional and other Metabolic Diseases) under diabetes, not in Chapter 7 (Diseases of the Eye and Adnexa). Chapter 4 also contains codes for use when a disease process has been treated and for disease that is stable. It is important for all physicians in a practice to review these changes because billing, coding, and payment will depend on the necessary information being documented in the chart. GUIDELINES The following is not a comprehensive list of all the changes for this year. Practices are advised to purchase and review the 2017 book.1 Diabetes mellitus has been abbreviated as DM. All descriptors have been abbreviated. Indented codes on this list are read with the beginning descriptor of the prior code. The hyphe Continue reading >>

E11.321-351 Diabetic Macular Edema

E11.321-351 Diabetic Macular Edema

E11.321Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema E11.331Moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema E11.341Severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema E11.351Proliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema A complication of diabetes that occurs when microaneurysms or dilated retinal capillaries leak fluid into the retina. Diabetes mellitus is a complex, multifactorial and heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by endogenous insulin deficiency and/or insulin resistance. The diseasemanifests itself as a state of chronic hyperglycemia with attendant microvascular and macrovascular complications. Macular edema may be present in any stage of diabetic retinopathy and is defined as any one of the following: Retinal thickening within 500 microns of the foveal center Hard exudates within 500 microns of the foveal center, if associated with the thickening of the adjacent retina Retinal thickening greater than one disc area in size, part of which is within one discdiameterof the center of the macul Walls of the blood vessels in the retina become fragile and weakened Weakened blood vessels have an increase in vascular permeability Lipid deposits form in the retinal tissue secondary to chronic edema Report seeing spots or floaters in field of view Report dark or empty spot in the central vision The main goal of the diagnostic evaluation in a patient with diabetic retinopathy is to accomplish the following: Determine the presence or absence of clinically significant macular edema If present, classify the severity of themacular edema Identify and exclude differential diagnosis The severity of the symptoms or signs isvaried and dependson the level of control the patient has over their diabetes. Patients can pr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Unspecified Diabetic Retinopathy Without Macular Edema

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Unspecified Diabetic Retinopathy Without Macular Edema

E11.319 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. Short description: Type 2 diabetes w unsp diabetic rtnop w/o macular edema This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E11.319 - other international versions of ICD-10 E11.319 may differ. Continue reading >>

Coding Q&a

Coding Q&a

CODING Q&A Diabetes Coding for ICD-10-CM SUZANNE L. CORCORAN, COE Coding and documentation for diabetes and especially diabetic eye disease have changed substantially with the implementation of ICD-10. Here are some considerations to keep in mind. Q. What are the major differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10 for diabetes? A. In coding diabetic eye disease, there are many changes. Instead of coding diabetes plus any ocular manifestations as separate codes, ICD-10 has introduced “combination codes” that describe the type of diabetes as well as any retinopathy and edema. In ICD-9, we coded diabetes as follows, with a fifth digit to identify the type of diabetes. 250.0_ Diabetes mellitus w/o mention of complication or manifestation 250.5_ Diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic manifestations • 0 – Type II, or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled • 1 – Type I [juvenile], not stated as uncontrolled • 2 – Type II, or unspecified type, uncontrolled • 3 – Type I [juvenile], uncontrolled When there was diabetic retinopathy, we coded also: 362.0 – Diabetic retinopathy • 362.01 – Background diabetic retinopathy • 362.02 – Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) • 362.03 – Nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, NOS (NPDR) • 362.04 – Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) • 362.05 – Moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) • 362.06 – Severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) • 362.07 – Diabetic macular edema (DME) Suzanne L. Corcoran, COE, is executive vice president and founder of Corcoran Consulting Group, San Bernardino, CA, which specializes in coding and reimbursement issues for ophthalmic practices. Her e-mail is [email protected] In ICD-10, everything has changed. First, the concept o Continue reading >>

What Retina Practices Need To Know About Icd-10

What Retina Practices Need To Know About Icd-10

After years of delay, ICD-10 (or the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision) is up and running in the United States. The system is used for tracking and monitoring diseases and for health care reimbursement by countries around the world. The new ICD-10 is five times larger than its 14,000-code predecessor ICD-9, demanding greater specificity in diagnoses. How physicians make clinical diagnoses remains the same -- what has changed is the granularity with which the new ICD-10 codes describe those diagnoses. Transitioning to the complex new system is no small task and is likely to present some intermittent challenges for retina practices. With this in mind, ASRS has compiled the following information and resources to assist member practices in their move to ICD-10. Scroll for insights from our interview with coding expert Joy Woodke COE, OCS on: Top 5 concepts for retina ICD-10 Understanding new ICD-10 terminology Tips for transitioning to ICD-10 Top 5 concepts for retina ICD-10 5. Not all ICD-9 codes perfectly crosswalk to a code in ICD-10, but most do Some new codes were not available in ICD-9—for example, the ICD-10 code for cystoid macular edema status post-cataract surgery is H59.03-, “dash” meaning additional digits in the family of codes; there was not a code that specific in ICD-9. There was cystoid macular edema, but not cystoid macular edema status-postcataract surgery. Some codes don't crosswalk 1:1. Example: diabetes. When we code diabetic macular edema in ICD-9, we use 250.51 or 250.50, stating diabetes type 1 or type 2. We use 362.0X (X = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6) for diabetic retinopathy, and then 362.07, diabetic macular edema. Those 3 codes all crosswalk to variations of a single code in ICD-10. A lot of people rely on their practice mana Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Unspecified Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Unspecified Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

E11.311 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. Short description: Type 2 diabetes w unsp diabetic retinopathy w macular edema This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E11.311 - other international versions of ICD-10 E11.311 may differ. A disease in which the body does not control the amount of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood and the kidneys make a large amount of urine. This disease occurs when the body does not make enough insulin or does not use it the way it should. A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. A metabolic disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels due to diminished production of insulin or insulin resistance/desensitization. A subclass of diabetes mellitus that is not insulin-responsive or dependent (niddm). It is characterized initially by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia; and eventually by glucose intolerance; hyperglycemia; and overt diabetes. Type ii diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop ketosis but often exhibit obesity. A type of diabetes mellitus that is characterized by insulin resistance or desensitization and increased blood glucose levels. This is a chronic disease that can develop gradually over the life of a patient and can be linked to both environmental factors and heredity. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without Continue reading >>

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