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Icd 10 Code For Post Pancreatectomy Diabetes

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code E89.1

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code E89.1

E00-E89 Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases E89-E89 Postprocedural endocrine and metabolic complications and disorders, not elsewhere classified E89- Postprocedural endocrine and metabolic complications and disorders, not elsewhere classified E89.1 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The 2018 edition of ICD-10-CM E89.1 became effective on October 1, 2017. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E89.1 - other international versions of ICD-10 E89.1 may differ. Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists there is a "use additional code" note at the etiology code, and a "code first" note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation. In most cases the manifestation codes will have in the code title, "in diseases classified elsewhere." Codes with this title are a component of the etiology/manifestation convention. The code title indicates that it is a manifestation code. "In diseases classified elsewhere" codes are never permitted to be used as first listed or principle diagnosis codes. They must be used in conjunction with an underlying condition code and they must be listed following the underlying condition. 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code E13.0 Other specified diabetes mellitus with hypero... E13.00 Other specified diabetes mellitus with hypero... E13.01 Other specified diabetes mellitus with hypero... E13.1 Other specified di Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

Health Care Information Technology , Health Care Information Technology , Practice Management , Modern Medicine Feature Articles In order to understand diabetes coding in ICD-10 , its worth making a comparison of the structural differences between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM. Diabetes mellitus (DM) codes in ICD-10-CM are combination codes that include the type of DM, the body system affected, and the complication affecting that body system as part of the code description. Subcategory levels first specify the type of complication by system, such as diabetes with kidney complications, ophthalmic complications, neurological complications, and circulatory complications. The subclassification level then describes the particular manifestation. E11.3: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications. E11.32: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. E11.321: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema. E11.329: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema. A subcategory for diabetes mellitus with other specified complications is also provided that includes codes for DM with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy, diabetic dermatitis, foot ulcer, other skin ulcer, periodontal disease, hypoglycemia, and hyperglycemia. As many codes as are needed to describe all of the associated complications that the patient has should be assigned from a particular category. Because of this code structure, there is no instructional note found under diabetes mellitus codes in ICD-10-CM requiring an additional code to identify the manifestation since it is already part of the code description. There are specific diabetes codes that do require additional codes in order to i Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Scenarios For Internal Medicine

Icd-10 Scenarios For Internal Medicine

The clinical concepts for internal medicine guide includes common ICD-10 codes, clinical documentation tips and clinical scenarios. ICD-10 Clinical Scenarios for Internal Medicine Scenario 1: Follow-Up: Kidney Stone Scenario 2: Epigastric Pain Scenario 3: Diabetic Neuropathy Scenario 4: Poisoning Scenario: COPD with Acute Pneumonia Example Scenario: Cervical Disc Disease Scenario: Abdominal Pain Scenario: Diabetes Scenario: ER Follow Up Quality clinical documentation is essential for communicating the intent of an encounter, confirming medical necessity, and providing detail to support ICD-10 code selection. In support of this objective, we have provided outpatient focused scenarios to illustrate specific ICD-10 documentation and coding nuances related to your specialty.The following scenarios were natively coded in ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM. As patient history and circumstances will vary, these brief scenarios are illustrative in nature and should not be strictly interpreted or used as documentation and coding guidelines. Each scenario is selectively coded to highlight specific topics; therefore, only a subset of the relevant codes are presented. The following scenarios were natively coded in ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM. As patient history and circumstances will vary, these brief scenarios are illustrative in nature and should not be strictly interpreted or used as documentation and coding guidelines. Each scenario is selectively coded to highlight specific topics; therefore, only a subset of the relevant codes are presented. Internal Medicine Clinical Scenarios: Scenario 1: Follow-Up: Kidney Stone Scenario Details Chief Complaint Follow-up from encounter 2 days ago, review results of tests1. 87 year old female with right lower back / flank pain (described as dull, achy and do Continue reading >>

Icd-10, Part 4: How To Code For Diabetic Retinopathy

Icd-10, Part 4: How To Code For Diabetic Retinopathy

Written By: Elizabeth Cottle, CPC, OCS, Rajiv R. Rathod, MD, MBA, Sue Vicchrilli, COT, OCS, and E. Joy Woodke, COE, OCS Finding the ICD-10 codes for diabetic retinopathy can be tricky. They are not listed in Chapter 7, Diseases of the Eye and Adnexa (H00-H59), but are in the diabetes section (E08-E13) of Chapter 4, Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases. Retinal complications. To further confuse matters, the most common retinal complications are in Chapter 7, not Chapter 4. Examples include vitreous hemorrhage (H43.1-), traction detachment of retina (H33.4-), and rubeosis iridis (H21.1-). New options. ICD-10 features codes for diagnoses that don’t currently have codes. These include drug- or chemical-induced diabetes mellitus (E09.-); gestational diabetes (Q24.4-); neonatal diabetes mellitus (P70.2); and postpancreatectomy, postprocedural, or secondary diabetes mellitus (E13.-). Changes in Documentation Some terms that you’re using in charts—such as “NIDDM,” “controlled,” and “uncontrolled”—will be obsolete when ICD-10 starts on Oct. 1, 2015. Instead, diabetes documentation should address the following questions: Is it type 1 or type 2? Is there diabetic retinopathy? If so, is it proliferative or nonproliferative? If nonproliferative, is it mild, moderate, or severe? Is there macular edema? Preparedness tips. To help you work through that series of questions, the AAOE has developed a decision tree that you can laminate and keep for reference at the coder’s desk. Download it at www.aao.org/icd10. You also should update your intake form so that staff can capture the type of diabetes. Insulin use? Submit Z79.4 as supporting documentation indicating any insulin use. What’s the Underlying Condition? According to ICD-10 instructions, physicians Continue reading >>

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 249.80 : Secondary Diabetes Mellitus With Other Specified Manifestations, Not Stated As Uncontrolled, Or Unspecified

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 249.80 : Secondary Diabetes Mellitus With Other Specified Manifestations, Not Stated As Uncontrolled, Or Unspecified

Secondary diabetes mellitus with other specified manifestations, not stated as uncontrolled, or unspecified Short description: Sec DM oth nt st uncontr. ICD-9-CM 249.80 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis on a reimbursement claim, however, 249.80 should only be used for claims with a date of service on or before September 30, 2015. For claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, use an equivalent ICD-10-CM code (or codes). You are viewing the 2012 version of ICD-9-CM 249.80. Convert to ICD-10-CM : 249.80 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.618 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other diabetic arthropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.620 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic dermatitis 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.621 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with foot ulcer 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.622 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other skin ulcer 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.628 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other skin complications 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.630 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with periodontal disease 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.638 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other oral complications 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.65 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with hyperglycemia 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.69 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other specified complication 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.618 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with other diabetic arthropathy 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.620 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with diabetic dermatitis 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.621 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with foot ulcer 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.622 Drug or chemical induced diabe Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Results of a recent coding and clinical documentation pilot study indicate that the ICD-10-CM coding classification changes made for diabetes mellitus have significantly improved coding for this disease. The results of the study noted that although a few ICD-10-CM "unspecified" diabetes codes were assigned, the majority of the diabetes codes sufficiently captured the diagnoses as expressed in the clinical documentation. In addition, the pilot study noted that the ICD-10-CM diabetes codes complement present medical science-separate type 1 and type 2 diabetes category codes and body system combination codes are a major improvement over ICD-9-CM. Instead of classifying as controlled or uncontrolled, ICD-10-CM classifies inadequately controlled, out of control, and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus by type with hyperglycemia. This article highlights key ICD-10-CM features for diabetes mellitus coding. In ICD-10-CM, chapter 4, "Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E89)," includes a separate subchapter (block), Diabetes mellitus E08-E13, with the categories: E08, Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E09, Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus E10, Type 1 diabetes mellitus E11, Type 2 diabetes mellitus E13, Other specified diabetes mellitus The diabetes mellitus categories E08–E13 are further subdivided into four- or five-character subcategories. When a category has been subdivided into four-, five-, or six-character codes, the diabetes code assigned represents the highest level of specificity within ICD-10-CM. ICD-10-CM Tabular Instructional Notes Diabetes mellitus tabular inclusions notes are introduced by the term "Includes" and appear at the beginning of a category. Categories E10–E13 inclusion notes further define or provide examples of th Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Blood sugar test - blood (Medical Encyclopedia) Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes - keeping active (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - tests and checkups (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - when you are sick (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes and exercise (Medical Encyclopedia) Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia) Continue reading >>

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code E08.641

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code E08.641

Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with hypoglycemia with coma 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code Manifestation Code E08.641 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. Short description: Diabetes due to underlying condition w hypoglycemia w coma The 2018 edition of ICD-10-CM E08.641 became effective on October 1, 2017. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E08.641 - other international versions of ICD-10 E08.641 may differ. E08.641 describes the manifestation of an underlying disease, not the disease itself. The following code(s) above E08.641 contain annotation back-references In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain: Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases All neoplasms, whether functionally active or not, are classified in Chapter 2. Appropriate codes in this chapter (i.e. E05.8 , E07.0 , E16 - E31 , E34.- ) may be used as additional codes to indicate either functional activity by neoplasms and ectopic endocrine tissue or hyperfunction and hypofunction of endocrine glands associated with neoplasms and other conditions classified elsewhere. transitory endocrine and metabolic disorders specific to newborn ( P70-P74 ) Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code pancreatitis and other diseases of the pancreas ( K85 - K86 .-) secondary diabetes mellitus NEC ( E13.- ) Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition ICD-10-CM E08.641 is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v35.0): 008 Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant : New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM) Type 2 diabetes mellitus without complications 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Continue reading >>

2017/18 Icd-10-cm Codes E13*: Other Specified Diabetes Mellitus

2017/18 Icd-10-cm Codes E13*: Other Specified Diabetes Mellitus

E10.1 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis E10.10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis wi... E10.11 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis wi... E10.2 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with kidney complica... E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephro... E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chroni... E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ... E10.3 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic comp... E10.31 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.32 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.321 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3211 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3212 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3213 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3219 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.329 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3291 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3292 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3293 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3299 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.33 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.331 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3312 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3313 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.339 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3391 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3392 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3393 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Due To Underlying Condition E08- >

Diabetes Mellitus Due To Underlying Condition E08- >

Codes E08 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E08.3 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with ophthalmic complications E08.32 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.33 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.34 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.35 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with proliferative diabetic retinopathy E08.6 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with other specified complications K86 should not be used for reimbursement purposes as there are multiple codes below it that contain a greater level of detail. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of K86 - other international versions of ICD-10 K86 may differ. Code History 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM) 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes. Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08.9

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E08.9

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Blood sugar test - blood (Medical Encyclopedia) Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes - keeping active (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - tests and checkups (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - when you are sick (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes and exercise (Medical Encyclopedia) Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Continue reading >>

Wear Your Detective Hat For Postpancreatectomy Diabetes Mellitus

Wear Your Detective Hat For Postpancreatectomy Diabetes Mellitus

Wear Your Detective Hat for Postpancreatectomy Diabetes Mellitus Following guidelines and asking questions are key to solving the T3cDM coding mystery. One guideline in ICD-10-CM consistently overlooked is I.C.4.a.6.b.i., which is specific to secondary diabetes mellitus due to a pancreatectomy. I.C.4.a.6.b.i. Secondary diabetes mellitus due to a pancreatectomy For postpancreatectomy diabetes mellitus (lack of insulin due to the surgical removal of all or part of the pancreas), assign code E89.1, Postprocedural hypoinsulinemia. Assign a code from category E13 and a code from subcategory Z90.41-, Acquired absence of pancreas, as additional codes. This guideline prompts a number of questions that must be answered before a thorough understanding can be attained. Why is this type of diabetes assigned to category E13 rather than category E08? E08 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition You may argue absence of some or the entire pancreas would be an underlying condition and that is correct. But if you look at how the categories of diabetes are divided in ICD-10-CM, you find category E13 pulls several underlying conditions out from category E08. Specifically, if the underlying condition is genetic (affecting beta-cell function or insulin action), surgical, or a condition not included in another category, it is coded to category E13. This understanding prompts two more questions: Why is postpancreatectomy diabetes mellitus included in category E13? What specifically makes this type of diabetes different from the other categories? According to Managing Diabetes and Hyperglycemia in the Hospital Setting, A Clinicians Guide (B. Draznin), postpancreatectomy diabetes mellitus is classified, along with a few other conditions, into its own type of diabetes mellitus, commonly re Continue reading >>

Getting Ready For Icd-10: How It Will Affect Your Documentation

Getting Ready For Icd-10: How It Will Affect Your Documentation

The basic structure and coding rules inherent in ICD-10 may not be your idea of compelling reading, but bear with me. This brief overview will help you understand why your documentation will become more important under ICD-10. Basic ICD-10 structure. An ICD-10 code consists of between three and seven characters. The first character is alpha. The second character is numeric. The third character is typically numeric, but the most recent updates to ICD-10 include some alpha characters in this position. These first three characters represent the category. For example, diabetes mellitus falls in the E00-E89 category of Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases. The fourth through seventh characters of an ICD-10 code appear after the decimal point and are either alpha or numeric. These characters reference etiology, anatomic site, and severity. Character seven is called an extension. Most of the exponential increase in the number of diagnostic codes under ICD-10 is related to these additional characters, as shown below: H10.013 Acute follicular conjunctivitis, bilateral. In this example, the first three characters (H10) describe conjunctivitis. The fourth and fifth characters describe the type of infection, and the sixth character describes the bilateral nature. Incidentally, if the conjunctivitis was the result of an external cause, you would have to add another code to identify that external cause. Although it would be easier if the purpose of the fourth, fifth, and sixth characters remained the same from category to category, that is not the case. The use of these characters varies by category, as shown below: H54.1 Blindness, one eye, low vision other eye, H54.11 Blindness, right eye, low vision left eye, H54.12 Blindness, left eye, low vision right eye, H54.41 Blind Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes: Time To Look At The Coding Guidelines Again

Coding Diabetes: Time To Look At The Coding Guidelines Again

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, prompting coders to review the coding guidelines for this disease suffered by more than 10.9 million U.S. residents. During November, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is raising awareness about diabetes, diabetic eye disease, the importance of early disease detection, and related preventive health services covered by Medicare. According to the CMS website, diabetes can lead to severe complications such as heart disease, stroke, vision loss, kidney disease, nerve damage, and amputation, among others, and it’s a significant risk factor for developing glaucoma. People with diabetes are more susceptible to many other illnesses such as pneumonia and influenza and are more likely to die from these than people who do not have diabetes. Among U.S. residents 65 years and older, 10.9 million (26.9 percent) had diabetes in 2010. Currently, 3.6 million Americans 40 and older suffer from diabetic eye disease. Education and early detection are major components to combating this disease. Let’s take a look at the coding guidelines for diabetes to ensure that we accurately select and capture the ICD-10-CM code(s) for this disease. As all health information management (HIM) coding professionals know (or should know), the ICD-10-CM Official Coding and Reporting Guidelines have been approved by the four organizations that make up the Cooperating Parties for ICD-10: the American Hospital Association (AHA), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). These official coding guidelines are organized into four sections. Section I includes the structure and conventions of the classification and general guidel Continue reading >>

Tips For Coding Diabetes With Icd-10

Tips For Coding Diabetes With Icd-10

ICD-10 is upon us, and many offices are feeling anxious. Your anxiety is not unfounded. Transitioning from the 13,000 code ICD-9 system to the 68,000 code ICD-10 system is pretty intimidating. Diabetes codes have undergone some of the most significant changes, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmic Executives (AAOE). With 29 million Americans now suffering from the disease, it’s critical for physicians across specialties to correctly code the disorder. The AAO recently addressed the changes to diabetes coding. Consider some of their insight and tips for coding diabetes with ICD-10. Get Specific ICD-10 is very specific, going beyond the general diabetic terms used in ICD-9, such as “controlled” or “uncontrolled, or “adult-onset” or “juvenile-onset.” Now, the codes are based on a system that first identifies the type of diabetes mellitus (DM), the system in the body that is affected and the complication affecting that body system. Physicians will need to be aware of their verbiage when charting or dictating patient conditions. First, start by identifying type 1 or type 2 DM. The two are usually distinguished by the use of insulin. However, clarification may be required from an endocrinologist since insulin is sometimes used by type 2 DM patients. Insulin is coded separately from DM, using code Z79.4. Multiple Codes Have Become One Once type 1 or type 2 diabetes has been identified, added subcategories will help identify how the diabetes is manifesting itself in the body. Let’s break it down a little more. For ophthalmologists that previously recorded a patient’s diabetic condition using three codes, you will now use one combined code. You’ll focus on three factors: Type of diabetes The existence, type and severity of retinopathy The existenc Continue reading >>

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