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Icd 10 Code For Mild Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema Right Eye

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Macular Degeneration 6 Natural Treatments for Macular Degeneration symptoms Macular Degeneration Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss, affecting more than 10 million Americans more than cataracts and glaucoma combined. At present, Macular Degeneration is considered an incurable eye disease. Macular Degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the central portion of the retina, the inside back layer of the eye that records the images we see and sends them via the optic nerve from the eye to the brain. The retinas central portion, known as the macula, is responsible for focusing central vision in the eye, and it controls our ability to read, drive a car, recognize faces or colors, and see objects in fine detail. One can compare the human eye to a camera. The macula is the central and most sensitive area of the so-called film. When it is working properly, the macula collects highly detailed images at the center of the field of vision and sends them up the optic nerve to the brain, which interprets them as sight. When the cells of the macula deteriorate, images are not received correctly. In early stages, macular degeneration does not affect vision. Later, if the disease progresses, people experience wavy or blurred vision, and, if the condition continues to worsen, central vision may be completely lost. People with very advanced macular degeneration are considered legally blind. Even so, because the rest of the retina is still working, they retain their peripheral vision, which is not as clear as central vision. Types of Macular Degeneration There are two basic types of Macular Degeneration: dry and wet. Approximately 85% to 90% of the cases of Macular Degeneration are the dry (atrophic) type, while 10-15% are the wet (exudative) type. Stargardt disease is a form of macular degeneration found in young people, caused by a recessive gene. Risk Factors The biggest risk factor for Macular Degeneration is age. Your risk increases as you age, and the disease is most likely to occur in those 55 and older. Other risk factors include: Genetics People with a family history of AMD are at a higher risk. Race Caucasians are more likely to develop the disease than African-Americans or Hispanics/Latinos. Smoking Smoking doubles the risk of AMD.

Top Icd-10-cm Changes: Diabetes, Glaucoma And Macular Degeneration

On October 1, 2016, changes to ICD-10-CM coding were implemented. While all of the code changes applicable for optometry are important, a few of the major changes are discussed in this article. Diabetic Ocular Complication Codes The first major change in ICD-10-CM codes for 2017 is for diabetic ocular complication coding. All of the DM retinopathy code choices will now specify which eye is impacted. Several new codes for proliferative diabetic retinopathy were also added. Note that a code for oral diabetic medication use (Z79.84) was added and should be used when applicable. The existing code to designate insulin use (Z79.4) was retained. Keep in mind that not all injectable diabetic medications are considered insulin. If a patient is on both oral medication and insulin, both of these medication codes should be used. The new codes for diabetic retinopathy apply to all the code categories, but only the E11.3 code section is detailed in this article so be sure to review the other categories if you are using them for any particular patient. The other categories include E08.3, E09.3, and E10.3. E11.3 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications All of the subcategories under Continue reading >>

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  1. loquat1

    loquat1 created the topic: ketoacidosis, vitamins, and rate of weight loss.
    Hello doc.,
    You prob. don't remember me, but you recently treated me for a suspected kidney stone at Queen Mary's (Sidcup). We briefly discussed fasting, and you recommended this site to me. Well, here I am, and here are my questions:
    1) I was re-admitted to QE 2 days after seeing you with the same excruciating pain (now in remission, thankfully). Whilst in hospital, I refused food for 3 days because I knew from experience that the pain would induce vomiting, and I didn't want to go thru that again. I'm T2 (controlled by diet & exercise), and the nurses were regularly monitoring by BG. By day 3 I was down to 3.2 mmols/l, and the nurse warned me that I was risking kidney damage from ketoacidosis if I did not eat. I still refused, so I was put on an IV glucose drip. My BG shot up to over 8 mmols/l very quickly, and the demands that I take food ceased. So my question: if my health was at such serious risk after just 3 days of nil by mouth, how on earth can I safely embark on a much longer fast without v. close medical supervision?
    2) As far as I'm aware, the human body does not have more than just a few days store of Vitamins C, D and K, so how is it possible for us to fast up to 40 days or more without compromising our health? Does supplementation come into consideration during fasting, or do you consider this completely unnecessary?
    3) I asked you about rate of weight loss during fasting, and you suggested roughly 1kg per day. This sounds excessive to me, and would mean I could only fast for around 10 days before I entered into starvation mode, as I do not have more than about 20lb of reserves. I have already conducted a few short fasts of 1-3 days duration, but want to try something much more adventurous. Bearing in mind my estimated reserves of body energy, would you agree that I was limited to no more than 10 days of fasting, based on your suggested rate of depletion?
    Thx,
    Costas

  2. TheFastDoctor

    Thanks for the post Costas and yes I do remember you.
    1. Blood sugar of 3.2 is just fine.. I have had a patient at 1.1, found him jogging in the mountains. Remember that ketones is an ALTERNATIVE for blood sugar. It is the way the body functions when living off your fat instead of food. So the drip simply put you back into anabolism. But I agree that you do need knowledgeable supervision for a fast if you have a metabolic condition. Problem is, nurses often just follow protocol, sometimes without understanding or considering the mechanisms. I do not believe your health was at risk from what you describe. There's just no way that a blood sugar of over 2.5 risks your kidneys.. one should ask whoever made that remark, what the mechanism of such injury would be and why specifically the kidneys..?
    2. The traditional wisdom of stores of Vitamins.. interesting but debatable. I have personally supervised fasts (water only) for up to 45 days with absolutely no detrimental effects. It could be that you have such tiny stores while ANABOLIC, that is, that burning carbohydrates (blood sugar) need these, but likely when you're catabolic, then the burning of ketones might not. I never consider "supplementation". Not when eating and not when fasting. Sometimes vitamins, like antibiotics, can be valuable medicines however.
    3. Bear in mind the rate of consumption is also determined by the size of your body. The 1 kg per day was observed in really big people. One of my patients lost only 9 kilograms in a 37 day fast.. but she was close to ideal weight when starting. Fat contains 35 kilojoules per gram and you can survive quite well on say 7000 kilojoules per day so the arithmetic is yours..
    Thanks for the interesting issues you raised. Looking forward to some more intellectual stuff.
    André

  3. loquat1

    Thanks for your answers & reassurance doc. Much appreciated.
    Let us assume, for the sake of argument, that the nurse was just using scare tactics to persuade me to eat. It didn't work, but still begs the question, as a T2 how long can I safely fast:
    1. Without medical supervision?
    2. With medical supervision?
    a)And would I have to go to my GP for this? Daily? Weekly? F/nigthly?
    b)Or phlebotomist? In which case, how often should blood samples be taken, and will she know what specific tests to request from the path. lab? Or do I have to tell her?
    And, if I may, a couple of supplementaries:
    3. Is improvement in insulin sensitivity directly related to the duration of the fast? Eg, would a 40-day fast give me double the sensitivity of a 20-day fast?
    4. Would four 10-day fasts spread over say 4 mnths give me the same level of sensitivity as one 40-day fast?
    Thanks again, and apologies if my questions are a little naive, or have already been answered elsewhere on this forum.
    Costas

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Basic Medical Coding Terminology Medical Coding Terms http://www.cco.us/medical-terminology... There are so many basic medical coding terms you need to know early on. Here are a few with simple explanations. I get questions on these when people start the first couple chapters of the coding. The books tend to make them much harder than they have to be. It's actually very simple. When they say category, subcategory, subclassification or truncated codes or main terms, what they're really meaning is for category codes. That's a 3 digit code. So like COPD is 496 and you don't need any other digits to explain COPD, it's 496. So that's a category code. Now even if a code like hypertension which is 401.9, that's just like essential hypertension, that has a subcategory which is 9. But the category would be 401, the 3 digits but it has an additional subcategory which is 9, which explains the code a little bit more. And as a general rule, if something ends in 9, it's unspecified. That's the way it is in ICD 9. In ICD 10, it'll be different. But then, you can extend that out. ICD 9 codes go up to 5 digits. The last digit is called a subclassification. So that's a 5th digit. Diabetes, 250.00. One of the most... I think, well known subclassification code because everybody knows, if you've been coding for very long and you will note this for your exams because they'll tend to do this to make sure you're paying attention, I guess... that if a diabetic code does not have 5 digits, it's not a valid code. If you accidentally leave off that last 0 or the 1 or the 2 you would put there then you're not going to get paid because it's not a valid code. It has a subclassification. And what it ultimately means is diabetes is so expandable, they can't fit everything that is involved with diabetes into those 4 digits or 3 digits. Now if a code is not taken to the highest level or the last digit that's available like a subclassification is called truncated. And so you always want to be as specific as you can in your classifications. Remember, you'll hear that again and again, go to the highest specificity. That's why you never see the DM code without 5 digits. That's an automatic giveaway that that is not a valid code. Now when you hear the term 'main term' this is... they're talking about what's the main term you're going to go look up in the index. So when you're looking up in your manuals, your ICD9 you know, you have the index and you have the tabular. You look up the main term in your index and then you look up that code and say it's diabetes. And it says 250 and then you go and you find 250 in the tabular and then you find out if it needs additional digits and it does. So some of the books that I used at the college would give you lists of different diagnostic terms to show you or help you practice what is the main term that you would look up. Because I'm telling you, if you look up the wrong main term, you're going to take more time because you're not going to be able to find it. So in this first one, senile dementia... and I underlined all of the main terms there in that list that you would use. So senile dementia, what does the person have? They don't have senile, they have dementia. That's the main term. Allergic enteritis. Enteritis is what they have, they don't have allergic. Renal hypertension. Now renal is a main term but hypertension is the type of... it's what type of hypertension they have. Chronic bronchitis is bronchitis. Chronic and acute is not a main term. Acquired deformity of the ankle -- you're going to look up deformity. Nasal packing due to severe epistaxis -- and if you don't know epistaxis, it just means they've got a bloody nose... so it's epistaxis. Hepatic infarct, the hepatic would be the liver and an infarct is a blockage. And so you can have you know, like a myocardial infarct of the heart. It's a blockage someplace and that one just happens to be in the liver. Now this... I may not pronounce this right, this Reynaud's gangrene. That's kind of a tricky one because you would normally say gangrene. But if it is named after somebody and that letter is capitalized, you can usually look it up by that name as well in the index. So that's kind of a tricky one. Acute cholecystitis with obstruction, it's cholecystitis. They have an obstruction but where is the obstruction? It's in the gallbladder so they have cholecystitis.... Click here to get more medical coding training, medical terminology tips, cpc exam tips, medical coding certification, and ceu credits. http://www.codingcertification.org/fr... http://youtu.be/R57uAMA84VM

Coding Q&a

CODING Q&A Diabetes Coding for ICD-10-CM SUZANNE L. CORCORAN, COE Coding and documentation for diabetes and especially diabetic eye disease have changed substantially with the implementation of ICD-10. Here are some considerations to keep in mind. Q. What are the major differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10 for diabetes? A. In coding diabetic eye disease, there are many changes. Instead of coding diabetes plus any ocular manifestations as separate codes, ICD-10 has introduced “combination codes” that describe the type of diabetes as well as any retinopathy and edema. In ICD-9, we coded diabetes as follows, with a fifth digit to identify the type of diabetes. 250.0_ Diabetes mellitus w/o mention of complication or manifestation 250.5_ Diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic manifestations • 0 – Type II, or unspecified type, not stated as uncontrolled • 1 – Type I [juvenile], not stated as uncontrolled • 2 – Type II, or unspecified type, uncontrolled • 3 – Type I [juvenile], uncontrolled When there was diabetic retinopathy, we coded also: 362.0 – Diabetic retinopathy • 362.01 – Background diabetic retinopathy • 362.02 – Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) Continue reading >>

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  1. testudoaubreii

    Oh man this is great info. I went full keto a few years ago, but have long since lost sight of the wagon I fell off of since then. My wife and I are ... considering (dithering/procrastinating/enjoying ice cream) it again now.
    Anyway, I never got past a vague light purple before, and wondered if I was somehow doing it wrong. This is really good info. Thanks!

  2. JMACJR

    I'd say that if you get any change at all in color, you're in ketosis . If it goes very dark, it more then likely speaks to your level of hydration ( Lack thereof ).

  3. xpnerd

    I concur - I have never seen dark purple but I'm drinking 3 to 4 litres a day. It's always a light purple and I'm doing just fine. I use them maybe once every few weeks just to see. I certainly do not use them every day and I got solid advice from the beginning not to as it affects the mental state of weight loss. Stick to your macros and Keto On. The rest will take care of itself.

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This is a video of ICD-9 Code and Medical Billing by ICON Medical Billing

Medical Billing Code Search

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of unspecified breast Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of right breast Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of left breast Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of other specified sites Includes: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of eyeNeoplasm of uncertain behavior of heartNeoplasm of uncertain behavior of peripheral nerves of orbit Excludes 1: neoplasm of uncertain behavior of connective tissue (D48.1)neoplasm of uncertain behavior of skin of eyelid (D48.5) Neoplasm of uncertain behavior, unspecified Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of digestive system Excludes 1: neoplasm of unspecified behavior of margin of anus (D49.2)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of perianal skin (D49.2)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of skin of anus (D49.2) Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of respiratory system Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of bone, soft tissue, and skin Excludes 1: neoplasm of unspecified behavior of anal canal (D49.0)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of anus NOS (D49.0)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of bone marrow (D49.89)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of cartilage of larynx (D49.1)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of cartilage of nose (D49.1)neoplasm of unspecified Continue reading >>

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  1. lpret

    Daily carb intake = 28 g of which 24 g is fibre.
    I do weight training to build muscle mass, but have cut out carbs to get my body to burn fat. However, I am not losing weight. Could it be that my carb intake is too low? I am in ketosis and was under the impression that this means that my body is burning fat for fuel.
    I also understood that your body will not target muscle as a fuel source when you are eating enough fat in a day?

  2. lpret

    Originally Posted by lpret
    Daily carb intake = 28 g of which 24 g is fibre.
    I do weight training to build muscle mass, but have cut out carbs to get my body to burn fat. However, I am not losing weight. Could it be that my carb intake is too low? I am in ketosis and was under the impression that this means that my body is burning fat for fuel.
    I also understood that your body will not target muscle as a fuel source when you are eating enough fat in a day?

    Oh yes, my calorie intake is about 1200 cal per day...

  3. MuZI

    Originally Posted by lpret
    Daily carb intake = 28 g of which 24 g is fibre.
    I do weight training to build muscle mass, but have cut out carbs to get my body to burn fat. However, I am not losing weight. Could it be that my carb intake is too low? I am in ketosis and was under the impression that this means that my body is burning fat for fuel.
    I also understood that your body will not target muscle as a fuel source when you are eating enough fat in a day?

    Give us more information about your diet? What are your calories and macro break down? What do you eat?

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