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Icd 10 Code For Mild Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema

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Common Cardiac Diagnosis Codes You Need To Know http://www.cco.us/cco-yt Alicia: Cardiac Diagnosis Codes -- These are I love, diagnosis codes, as many of you already know. But, cardiac diagnosis codes can be a lot of fun. There's some that you should probably just make note of especially if you're working with maybe Medicare patients or patients more likely to have cardiac issues. The ones that I pulled out this time were 414.00, 414.01, 443.9 and 429.2 and 412. These are ones that you could see quite a bit and we've even created a little poll after I talked about to see if you catch the nuances of these codes. Common cardiac codes that you should just be familiar with. The first one, 414.00, coronary atherosclerosis -- this is CAD. If you're not familiar with the abbreviation, when someone says they have CAD, that's what it is. But, what makes this CAD different is this is the one you use after a person's already had a CABG. That means they've had a bypass graft put in. So, think, if somebody's had a CABG, if it's in the medical history or in the chart, then you're going to use 414.00. But, if a person has CAD and they've not had a CABG done before, it's going to be (.01). If they've had a CABG use (.00), think the two zeroes look like two heads of cabbage, two round circles there. If they've not had a CABG, look, it doesn't look like two zeroes, it's (.01) so no CABG was done. That's again, coronary atherosclerosis and it is CAD. Another common code is 443.9, peripheral vascular disease, unspecified. They're just saying the person has PVD. A lot of times, it will be written PVD especially in handwritten notes. But they'll say, "person has PVD." Also, intermittent claudication; you'll see that a lot of times in the reports. I've never really seen documented spasms of the artery, but that obviously falls into this because it's listed. 443.9, if the person has PVD, they have it for life. So, as far as with HCC coding, if I have a patient that has 443.9 and they're on a medication for that. Or, he checks the peripheral pulses -- you know how you see him pinch their fingers in their nail bed to see how long it takes for the color to come back, stuff like that. Anything that he does to check the peripheral vascular system, it concurs or gives you additional documentation the person has 443.9, peripheral vascular disease. It's something that you see pretty often. Again, if they've had it in the past, that means they're stuck on it. In red here, when you look at that code, that excludes atherosclerosis of the arteries of the extremities. That's a little bit different. 429.2 -- This often is confused with PVD. But it is actually different, it's cardiovascular disease, unspecified. And you'll see this acronym a lot ASCVD -- arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. That is different than peripheral vascular disease, because peripheral is exactly what it sounds like. It's those peripheral or outlying vascular system that is diseased. With cardiovascular disease or arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease, then think of it like starting at the heart and working its way out. It's a little bit different. Get more medical coding training, medical coding tips, medical coding certification and free medical coding webinars at http://www.cco.us/cco-yt

New Diabetes-related Diagnosis Codes You Need To Know

New diabetes-related diagnosis codes you need to know Ask the Coding Experts, by Doug Morrow, O.D., Harvey Richman, O.D., Rebecca Wartman, O.D. From the November/December 2016 edition of AOA Focus , page 48-49. On Oct. 1, 2016, hundreds of new ICD-10 codes that impact doctors of optometry went into effect. Several additions and revisions have been made in Chapter 4 of the ICD-10 code set (endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases). This chapter includes diabetes-related diagnosis codes. Because doctors of optometry perform the majority of comprehensive, dilated eye examinations for people with diabetes in the United States and are well versed in the treatment and management of diabetic eye disease, it is critical that doctors of optometry are aware of these updated codes. In addition to the diabetes code changes, many other code changes have occurred. Included in this column are just a few of these important changes. New 'code additional' requirements for type II diabetes (E11) The ICD-10 guidelines provide direction on the sequence for reporting certain conditions. The guidelines indicate, "Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifesta Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Suzieplump

    I am just starting the Atkin's diet again. I am in my third day of the induction diet, and I was feeling terrible earlier today. Has anyone experienced excessive sweating while on the diet? I was extremely hot at work today and sweating when none of my co-workers were. This only happened for about 2 hours and I am fine again. No, I am not going through menopause (only 35 years old). Thanks.
    Suzie

  2. TombRaider

    For the first month or so, I was sweating as if I was in the jungle or something (although Chicago in July is not far from it!!). I chalked it up to an increase in my metabolism that came with the diet.. Since getting into OWL, this has been much less of a problem and things have stabilized although this has still been a much tougher summer than usual for dealing with the heat.

  3. Suzieplump

    Thanks for the reply. I thought maybe I was the only person who experienced sweating. I have been exercising on this diet too, so I did think that maybe my body was adjusting to everything. I do feel great right now though. I haven't wieghed myself, but I think that I have lost quite a bit of weight in these first three days. My clothes fit more loosely now. I am afraid to weigh myself, because the scale seems to discourage me!!! I hope I can stick to this new way of eating because I have a tendency to go back to my old habits. This will be a challenge for me, but I must say that I do feel good now.
    Suzie :roll:

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http://www.icd10forkindergarten.com http://www.pacecoding.com

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E11.329

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 D Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. tigherblood

    So I've been trying to specify my macros more and I'm a little stuck on how much protein I should be eating. My weight is 184 and I would estimate myself to be about 45% body fat percentage and I'm going to put down sedentary to be conservative, but I'm getting a few different answers from different sources. I looked into a couple of formulas as well as a few keto calculators. I'm basically getting anywhere from 60g of protein a day (I find this really hard to believe because I just can't seem to figure out a way to eat 1300 cal, under 20g carbs, and under 60g protein.)
    At the same time, I'm nervous that eating up to 90g of protein will be too much! In addition on formula I did said that it should be .6 of your weight?? That's over 100g of protein for me!
    Can anyone shed light to this?

  2. anbeav

    Use the keto calculator in the side bar and set it based on activity and lean body mass
    Sedentary: 0.8 grams per lb LBM
    Moderate endurance/strength training: 0.8 to 1 gram per lb LBM
    What are your stats? Details would be helpful to know if 100 grams is too much
    It's best to follow your protein goal, but you have to massively overeat protein to affect ketosis so don't worry too much about this once it's set.

  3. tigherblood

    Keto Calculator for macros
    That's the first calculator I used and it gives me a range of 61-101g of protein. Now because I've chosen sedentary, it tells me I should go with 61g, but I found that really hard to stick with, so I looked at some other sources to help. My height is 5'4", by the way. Again, I'm just concerned that if I go up to 80 or 90g, which is more realistic (seriously 60g is like 4 pieces of chicken and a stalk of broccoli) that it'll be too much because I'm not being very active at the moment
    Thanks for your response, by the way!

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Here's a quick video tutorial on how to translate ICD-9 codes into ICD-10.

Icd-9 Cm Icd-10 Cm Diabetic Retinopathy:

background 362.01 E10.311 Type 1 with macular edema E10.319 Type 1 without macular edema E11.311 Type 2 with macular edema E11.319 Type 2 without macular edema E13.311 other specified types of diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E13.319 other specified types of diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy without macular edema proliferative 362.02 E10.351 Type 1 with macular edema E10.359 Type 1 without macular edema E11.351 Type 2 with macular edema E11.359 Type 2 without macular edema E13.351 other specified diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E13.359 other specified diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema nonproliferative, NOS nonproliferative, mild 362.03 362.04 E10.321 Type 1 with macular edema E10.329 Type 1 without macular edema E11.321 Type 2 with macular edema E11.329 Type 2 without macular edema E13.321 other specified types of diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E13.329 other specified types of diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema nonproliferat Continue reading >>

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  1. neckhole

    Should I see a doctor?
    I know the answer to this, it's Yes! However, I thought I'd seek some advice first.
    I'm a Type 1 Diabetic, but otherwise I've been blessed with very good health, I'm hardly ever sick. However, for some reason starting today around 11:00 AM, I started having lots of trouble with Hypoglycemia. I kept eating candy and drinking apple juice every 20-30 minutes, but I was still testing out below 70 (typically 50-60).
    Eventually, I just turned suspended my basal insulin and was perplexed why I wasn't bouncing back up when I suddenly fell quite ill. I've been regularly throwing up now for almost 4 hours as well as having other unpleasant bathroom experiences.
    I'm hesitant to go to the hospital for two reasons:
    My company was just acquired by another and my transition to the new benefits is probably complete, but we haven't yet received any of our id cards or anything along those lines.
    The last time I got sick I went to the hospital (food poisoning, they suspected) and it was a terrible experience. I was out of town on vacation, so I got treated as "uninsured" and they did an atrocious job of managing my diabetes. They wound up taking me off my pump and managing me on a sliding scale, but never gave me enough insulin and I wound up having high blood sugar that caused them to not want to release me. Eventually I think I had to tell the doctor that either he let me manage my disease or I was never going to get discharged, sure enough a day later I had everything under control. But it literally took a week to get to that point.
    I'm just trying to avoid a repeat of what I experienced last time. Based on my experience, the best way to avoid that today is to avoid going to the hospital. But, I admit this may not be the wisest approach.
    How about you guys? How long of vomiting/diarrhea and not being able to keep food down before I should head to the hospital? I'm not running a temperature at all, but I do feel a bit feverish. If my pre and post-diagnosis health is any indication at all I'd have this licked overnight.

  2. cyjake111

    if you're not digesting food cuz it goes out b4 it can be digested you're not getting sugars. This sounds like a ticking time bomb waiting to happen. all hospitals are the same. If you have a reputable one close to you, go there. I have several close ones where I live and 2 are my go to hospitals if I ever go to the ER.
    Just go in there and say you can't keep your food down or in and your bg is hypo so you need fluids. they'll hook you up to an iv with sugar and make sure you don't die and keep track of your bg.

  3. wumsel

    Eventually, I just suspended my basal insulin
    It is not still suspended, is it? That can easily lead to DKA.
    Is your blood sugar still low? Are you monitoring ketones? (If they are high, is it because of a ketogenic diet?)
    I know I would try to avoid going to the hospital, but that may not be very wise. (When diagnosed, I was in a very bad shape and had Kussmaul breathing due to avoiding doctors for so long.)

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