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Icd 10 Code For Mild Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Ou

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Here's a quick video tutorial on how to translate ICD-9 codes into ICD-10.

Icd-10-cm Diabetes Diag Codes

The discharge ICD-10-CM codes included in this spreadsheet are acceptable for use to answer "YES" to "Diabetes Mellitus" to complete the NHSN Operative Procedure Details. The definition excludes patients who receive insulin for perioperative control of hyperglycemia but have no diagnosis of diabetes. (reviewed 11012016) ICD-10-CM DIABETES DIAGNOSES CODES DESCRIPTIONS E10.10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma E10.11 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with coma E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephropathy E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chronic kidney disease E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic kidney complication E10.311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.321 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.329 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.331 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.339 Type 1 dia Continue reading >>

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  1. AtomikRadio

    Here's my story I posted a while back, with some minor edits for more relevance:
    I'd heard reddit go crazy for keto so long I said "Hey, why not try it?" I was already losing weight from calorie counting (low-fat as a result) at a very acceptable pace of a bit over 2 lb/week, but I wanted to see if keto could speed that up and I was just curious how the diet felt. So I bought all the right food and some keto stix and dedicated myself to keto. And about half a day after my ketostix told me I was ketosis I nearly got in a car accident as I was struck with terrible abdominal pain.
    I went to the ER and the doctors tested my blood and urine and, other than the ketones, found nothing out of the ordinary. They gave me a pain killer and a saline solution to rehydrate (just in case, even though I'd been drinking lots due to recommendations about keto) and sent me home, telling me to return to a normal diet. After returning to a normal diet the pain did not return.
    But because of the saline IV I always wondered "Was it just hydration?" So several months later I made sure to drink lots of water every day and after a few days to ensure proper hydration I began keto again. 10 hours later I returned to the hospital with terrible abdominal pain. They sent me for an ultrasound and found out that I had gallstones and the drastically increased fat intake had likely caused them to mobilize, causing the pain.
    I returned to eating normally and, for good measure, had my gallbladder removed. Now, I thought this was just me but I've searched gallbladder on /r/keto and found many people also had to have their gallbladders out after starting keto. Hell, here on /r/loseit just last night I read about a gentleman with a similar experience.
    To be clear I do not think keto caused the gallstones. The gallstones were likely the result of years of bad, high-fat fast-food. However, it was the massive increase in fat intake from keto that triggered each attack. Will the majority of people who do keto experience this and/or need surgery? No, of course not. But when a diet has a propensity to send people to the ER and cause them to have their organs removed I have to worry about what's going on.
    So, my personal experience combined with the fact that, while people experience faster initial weight loss, their weight change numbers at 12 months out are virtually identical to those who are on a low-fat calorie restricted diet I see no reason to massively overhaul your diet in such a way. The vast majority of keto-ers I know do not maintain their diet for years, often returning to a more carbohydrate-rich diet after hitting their goal weight. Many people even plan to return to "normal" eating before even starting keto. This results in them reaching a goal weight and then not knowing how to eat properly because they were relying on a strange macro distribution and extreme carbohydrate restriction for so long. Integrating carbs back into the diet can be difficult for some and lead to regain because they never learned to eat a regular diet properly, something that simple calorie-restriction without regard to macros allows. While keto is much more sound than a grapefruit diet or a soup diet it shares one huge problem: It's not preparing people for a lifetime of healthy eating once they meet their goal weight.
    So while I try to keep an open mind and stay somewhat up to date on the research I'm not really a keto fan.

  2. 2babybirdies

    I can second this experience with some slight variations. I have sort of yo-yo dieted in the past 10 years, including a few bouts following a keto diet. During my last experience following that diet I started having terrible abdominal pain after every meal... and other unpleasant abdominal issues if you follow me. Long story short, after lots and lots of hospital tests and a hospitalization where I required IV pain management for several days, I found out I have gallbladder cholecystitis. This is the other spectrum of gallbladder disorder, no stones, but my gallbladder refuses to process fat and it just... goes right through me if I eat anything too fatty, or if fat is too high a percentage of my diet, like when I was doing keto.
    I'm definitely not saying this would happen to everyone, or that people shouldn't do keto. But I have since read that diets like that can lead to gallbladder issues in some people. I still have my gallbladder, but I have to be careful about how I eat, particularly when I am eating less carbs. I am losing weight now by calorie counting, and by default eating fewer carbs, but I have to be sure I get a decent amount of whole grain every day to keep my fat percentage lower or suffer the consequences.

  3. Silvercumulus

    I see no reason to massively overhaul your diet in such a way. The vast majority of keto-ers I know do not maintain their diet for years, often returning to a more carbohydrate-rich diet after hitting their goal weight. Many people even plan to return to "normal" eating before even starting keto. This results in them reaching a goal weight and then not knowing how to eat properly because they were relying on a strange macro distribution and extreme carbohydrate restriction for so long.
    Amen.

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This is a video of ICD-9 Code and Medical Billing by ICON Medical Billing

Medical Billing Code Search

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of unspecified breast Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of right breast Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of left breast Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of other specified sites Includes: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of eyeNeoplasm of uncertain behavior of heartNeoplasm of uncertain behavior of peripheral nerves of orbit Excludes 1: neoplasm of uncertain behavior of connective tissue (D48.1)neoplasm of uncertain behavior of skin of eyelid (D48.5) Neoplasm of uncertain behavior, unspecified Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of digestive system Excludes 1: neoplasm of unspecified behavior of margin of anus (D49.2)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of perianal skin (D49.2)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of skin of anus (D49.2) Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of respiratory system Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of bone, soft tissue, and skin Excludes 1: neoplasm of unspecified behavior of anal canal (D49.0)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of anus NOS (D49.0)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of bone marrow (D49.89)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of cartilage of larynx (D49.1)neoplasm of unspecified behavior of cartilage of nose (D49.1)neoplasm of unspecified Continue reading >>

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  1. Author_33

    Are there any Type 2 diabetics who have been on ketogenic diet long enough to become "Fit"? Someone who might work out, has great bloodwork, NO MORE insulin resistance or medication, ext. does anyone here that fits this profile "carb cycle"?? (for example do you eat a keto diet all the time and pick one day a month -or every 2 months- to eat "some" carbs you otherwise would not eat on a keto diet. I'm wondering if a diabetic (who has reversed insulin resistance) can eat carbs """ONCE a month"""? If so, what do you eat? homemade bread or store bought pasta? if you do any of this do you have normal blood sugar after "one" high carb meal? do your workouts feel great? do you get back into ketosis easy after one meal or even one day of eating carbs? have you tested these carb days with and without exercise? what type of exercise do you do, if any? Thank you for reading all these questions! I hope to find someone who can help that has first hand experience and knowledge from testing. thank you again!
    Note: I know the ketogenic diet reverses insulin resistance and people no longer need meds, but I am wondering has anyone has done this "reversed" their diabetes and then tried to eat carbs for one day. Does the blood sugar get bad after one meal? does it stay normal for a day? be it carbs from extra veggies, carbs from store-bought bread, homemade bread, pasta, almond flour, potatoes... I am curious about all types of carbs and how the blood sugar acts differently to each of these types of carbs.

  2. taedrin

    Not first hand knowledge, but...
    From what I understand, a ketogenic diet will actually increase insulin resistance (temporarily). This is an adaptive response by your body to conserve glucose for organs which cannot survive off of ketone bodies alone. So someone who suddenly eats carbs while they are in ketosis will actually have worse blood sugar than someone who is not in ketosis. This is why people are supposed to eat a carb heavy diet for 3 days before a OGTT - to make sure that their insulin response is properly turned for a diet heavy in carbohydrates. The main advantage of a ketogenic diet is that it is easier to manage your blood glucose when you body needs less of it for survival (due to it using ketone bodies as fuel instead).
    Furthermore, diabetes is permanent. It cannot be cured with today's medicinal knowledge. When people say they have "reversed" their diabetes, they are actually saying that they have reversed their high blood sugar and are able to manage their diabetes with diet and exercise alone without insulin or other drugs. If they revert to their old lifestyle, their blood sugars will return. Ergo, their diabetes never "went away" - it was always there, they were just managing it through lifestyle choices.
    Please also note that diabetes is a spectrum - especially T2. Some people with diabetes only have problems when they have a lot of excess body fat. These people might be able to enjoy carbohydrates again if they lose weight. Other people with diabetes will have problems no matter how much they diet or how much they exercise - these people will never be able to enjoy carbohydrates in significant amounts without insulin.

  3. marshmallowandcoffee

    Furthermore, diabetes is permanent. It cannot be cured with today's medicinal knowledge. When people say they have "reversed" their diabetes, they are actually saying that they have reversed their high blood sugar and are able to manage their diabetes with diet and exercise alone without insulin or other drugs. If they revert to their old lifestyle, their blood sugars will return. Ergo, their diabetes never "went away" - it was always there, they were just managing it through lifestyle choices.
    Thank you for this! it really bothers me that reversal is a word even medical professionals use. Managing your symptoms =/= reversing the illness. I much prefer to call it remission because the symptoms come back when you stop managing diabetes, whether that's an insulin dependent diabetic stopping their insulin or a low carbing diabetic resuming their old eating habits.

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Macular Degeneration 6 Natural Treatments for Macular Degeneration symptoms Macular Degeneration Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss, affecting more than 10 million Americans more than cataracts and glaucoma combined. At present, Macular Degeneration is considered an incurable eye disease. Macular Degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the central portion of the retina, the inside back layer of the eye that records the images we see and sends them via the optic nerve from the eye to the brain. The retinas central portion, known as the macula, is responsible for focusing central vision in the eye, and it controls our ability to read, drive a car, recognize faces or colors, and see objects in fine detail. One can compare the human eye to a camera. The macula is the central and most sensitive area of the so-called film. When it is working properly, the macula collects highly detailed images at the center of the field of vision and sends them up the optic nerve to the brain, which interprets them as sight. When the cells of the macula deteriorate, images are not received correctly. In early stages, macular degeneration does not affect vision. Later, if the disease progresses, people experience wavy or blurred vision, and, if the condition continues to worsen, central vision may be completely lost. People with very advanced macular degeneration are considered legally blind. Even so, because the rest of the retina is still working, they retain their peripheral vision, which is not as clear as central vision. Types of Macular Degeneration There are two basic types of Macular Degeneration: dry and wet. Approximately 85% to 90% of the cases of Macular Degeneration are the dry (atrophic) type, while 10-15% are the wet (exudative) type. Stargardt disease is a form of macular degeneration found in young people, caused by a recessive gene. Risk Factors The biggest risk factor for Macular Degeneration is age. Your risk increases as you age, and the disease is most likely to occur in those 55 and older. Other risk factors include: Genetics People with a family history of AMD are at a higher risk. Race Caucasians are more likely to develop the disease than African-Americans or Hispanics/Latinos. Smoking Smoking doubles the risk of AMD.

Top Icd-10-cm Changes: Diabetes, Glaucoma And Macular Degeneration

On October 1, 2016, changes to ICD-10-CM coding were implemented. While all of the code changes applicable for optometry are important, a few of the major changes are discussed in this article. Diabetic Ocular Complication Codes The first major change in ICD-10-CM codes for 2017 is for diabetic ocular complication coding. All of the DM retinopathy code choices will now specify which eye is impacted. Several new codes for proliferative diabetic retinopathy were also added. Note that a code for oral diabetic medication use (Z79.84) was added and should be used when applicable. The existing code to designate insulin use (Z79.4) was retained. Keep in mind that not all injectable diabetic medications are considered insulin. If a patient is on both oral medication and insulin, both of these medication codes should be used. The new codes for diabetic retinopathy apply to all the code categories, but only the E11.3 code section is detailed in this article so be sure to review the other categories if you are using them for any particular patient. The other categories include E08.3, E09.3, and E10.3. E11.3 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications All of the subcategories under Continue reading >>

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  1. goedegeit

    Since I've started on Keto, I've been getting some bad stabbing pains in my right shoulder blade. I'm worried that it could be gall stones or something.
    I've been on keto for just over a month now and lost over half a stone, and I'm happy with what I'm eating, but if this is giving me gallstones I'm off it faster than a dog on a forbidden chair when their owner comes in.

  2. sassytaters

    IANAD, but from what I've read around here, switching from a low-fat diet to a high-fat can get the gallbladder squeezing and contracting and doing its job better, which can dislodge any stones that are already in there (likely caused by the high-carb diet, where it didn't have to do as much). When I first tried Atkins in 2012, I had awful gallbladder attacks after eating fatty stuff like pulled pork. Unfortunately I used it as one of many excuses to fall off the wagon, and it took me 2 years to find my way back to low-carb eating. I've had 0 gallbladder trouble this time (I have been keto for two years), but I have no idea what the difference would be or if maybe all the stones I had just worked themselves loose or what.
    Here's a link that might help:
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/gallstones-and-low-carb

  3. Kye7

    Thanks for the link and great post.
    I dramatically changed my diet yesterday, starting keto.
    I today (1 day later) have a deep pain in my right shoulder, and I think this is the cause. I am extremely healthy, work out 5 days a week, but never had a pain like this. It only hurts at about a 3/10, but enough to be uncomfortable.
    What can I do to make it stop? I obviously made the transition much too quickly. Have I done permanent damage to my body? Thanks in advance for your reply.

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