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Icd 10 Code For Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Uncontrolled

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

Icd-10 Training: Coding For Diabetes

In order to understand diabetes coding in ICD-10, it’s worth making a comparison of the structural differences between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM. Diabetes mellitus (DM) codes in ICD-10-CM are combination codes that include the type of DM, the body system affected, and the complication affecting that body system as part of the code description. Subcategory levels first specify the type of complication by system, such as diabetes with kidney complications, ophthalmic complications, neurological complications, and circulatory complications. The subclassification level then describes the particular manifestation. For example: E11.3: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications. E11.32: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. E11.321: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema. E11.329: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema. A subcategory for diabetes mellitus with other specified complications is also provided that includes codes for DM with diabetic neuropathic arthropathy, diabetic dermatitis, foot ulcer, other skin ulcer, periodontal disease, hypoglycemia, and hyperglycemia. As many codes as are needed to describe all of the associated complications that the patient has should be assigned from a particular category. Because of this code structure, there is no instructional note found under diabetes mellitus codes in ICD-10-CM requiring an additional code to identify the manifestation since it is already part of the code description. There are specific diabetes codes that do require additional codes in order to identify the manifestation further, such as diabetes with foot ulcer to identify the site of the ulcer, or diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Icd-10 Case Study | Practice Fusion

Diabetes Mellitus Icd-10 Case Study | Practice Fusion

A 40-year-old male presents in his physicians office with complaints of new onset of excessive thirst, urinary frequency and fatigue. His physician ran several tests and based on the results he diagnosed his patient with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The value of describing patient conditions with ICD-10 codes as compared to ICD-9 codes is made evident when comparing codes available for specific conditions. A common disease affecting millions of patients is diabetes mellitus. According to the American Diabetes Association, Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes is associated with long-term damage, dysfunction, and failure of various organs, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. In spite of the significant prevalence of this disease, ICD-9 codes describing this condition lack specificity, resulting in the lumping of many patients into broad categories that are not as useful for comparisons and quality measures as ICD-10 codes will be once implemented. Patients with diabetes mellitus are most often described with two ICD-9 codes. ICD-9 codes in the 250xx series describe primary diabetes of all types. Codes in the 249xx group describe secondary diabetes without information regarding the underlying cause of the diabetes. Each series includes a general description of a few complications that may be associated with this disease without detailed descriptions of those complications. These codes lack the specificity necessary to fully document patients medical conditions. The ICD-10 Index includes approximately six pages of specific listings for diabetes and its various clinical manifestations. Almost all of Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm

By Karen M. Kostick ICD-10-CM diabetes codes complement present medical science—separate type 1 and type 2 diabetes category codes and body system combination codes represent a major improvement over ICD-9-CM. Diabetes mellitus codes are no longer classified as controlled or uncontrolled. Instead ICD-10-CM classifies inadequately controlled, out of control, and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus by type with hyperglycemia. ICD-10-CM diabetes codes are combination codes that include the type of diabetes mellitus, body system affected, and the complications affecting that body system. The following examples apply ICD-10-CM chapter 4, “Diabetes mellitus E08-E13” tabular list instructions and illustrate diabetes mellitus code combinations and code specificity. ICD-10-CM Diabetes Mellitus Coding Examples ICD-10-CM diabetes codes are combinations codes that include the type of diabetes mellitus, body system affected, and the complications affecting that body system. Diagnosis: A patient is seen for diabetic chronic kidney disease, stage 3. The patient has type 2 diabetes and takes insulin on a daily basis. E11.22 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chronic kidney disease N18.3 Chronic kidney disease, stage 3 (moderate) Z79.4 Long term (current) use of insulin Rationale: There is a combination code for the type 2 diabetes with chronic kidney disease, and the tabular instructs the coder to use an additional code to identify the stage of the chronic kidney disease. At the E11 category level, the use additional code note instructs the coder to identify insulin use. Diagnosis: A female patient with type 1 diabetes is seen for severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema. E10.341 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy Continue reading >>

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus in ICD-10 How do coders report uncontrolled DM in ICD-10-CM? First, coders will need to have further documentation of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia as there is no default code for uncontrolled diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes is classified by type and whether it is hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. The term uncontrolled is not synonymous with hyperglycemia. The term poorly controlled is synonymous with hyperglycemia when referring to diabetes in ICD-10-CM. In ICD-9-CM, uncontrolled diabetes had a specific 5th digit to show that the diabetes was controlled or uncontrolled. This is no longer the case in ICD-10-CM. If the patient has documented uncontrolled diabetes, without further clarification of hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia, a query is necessary to clarify which type the patient has. If the patient does have documented hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia in addition to the diagnosis of uncontrolled diabetes, ICD-10-CM codes would be used to show that the diabetes is with hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia. Is uncontrolled and poorly controlled DM the same? No, uncontrolled and poorly controlled are not interchangeable when describing diabetes in ICD-10-CM. Uncontrolled can mean either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia and is indexed as such in ICD-10-CM. Poorly controlled means hyperglycemia per the ICD-10-CM index. Poorly controlled-code to Diabetes, by type with hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia-see Diabetes, by type, with hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia-see Diabetes, by type, with hypoglycemia Please see question and answer in AHA Coding Clinic, First Quarter 2017 Page: 42 The information contained in this coding advice is valid at the time of posting. Viewers are encouraged to research subsequent official guidance in the areas associated with Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus E11- >

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus E11- >

A disease in which the body does not control the amount of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood and the kidneys make a large amount of urine. This disease occurs when the body does not make enough insulin or does not use it the way it should. A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. A metabolic disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels due to diminished production of insulin or insulin resistance/desensitization. A subclass of diabetes mellitus that is not insulin-responsive or dependent (niddm). It is characterized initially by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia; and eventually by glucose intolerance; hyperglycemia; and overt diabetes. Type ii diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop ketosis but often exhibit obesity. A type of diabetes mellitus that is characterized by insulin resistance or desensitization and increased blood glucose levels. This is a chronic disease that can develop gradually over the life of a patient and can be linked to both environmental factors and heredity. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood.over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestati Continue reading >>

Correctly Coding: Diabetes Mellitus

Correctly Coding: Diabetes Mellitus

When selecting International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), diagnostic codes, accuracy is important when describing the patient’s true health. A joint effort between the healthcare provider and the coder/biller is essential to achieve complete and accurate documentation, code assignment, and reporting of diagnoses and procedures. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most inaccurately coded chronic conditions. Many billers/coders/providers are missing opportunities to show which patients are sicker and are at a higher risk. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the complexity of diabetes coding require a solid understanding of the ICD-10 coding guidelines to ensure accurate code assignment. These diagnosis codes are also used in determining the eligible population for the Comprehensive Diabetes Care quality measure and the threshold the member is held to in order to be in control for the Controlling High Blood Pressure quality measure. ICD-10 Category E11* Diabetes Mellitus: Tips on How to Code using ICD-10 Codes Diabetes Mellitus is an HCC (Hierarchical Condition Category) The diabetes mellitus codes are combination codes that include: 1. The type of diabetes mellitus 2. The body system(s) affected 3. The complications affecting the body system(s) When coding diabetes mellitus, you should use as many codes from categories E08-E13* as necessary to describe all of the complications and associated conditions of the disease. These categories are listed below: ICD-10 Code Category ICD-10 Description Note: E08* Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition Code first the underlying condition Use additional code to identify any insulin use E09* Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus Code first poisoning due to drug or toxin, if applicable Use addi Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Codes For Diabetes

Icd-10 Codes For Diabetes

There's More Than One Type Of Diabetes... I'm pretty sure all of you who made it thus far in this article are familiar with the fact that there are at least two major types of diabetes: type I, or juvenile, and type II, with usual (though not mandatory) adult onset. Just like ICD-9, ICD-10 has different chapters for the different types of diabetes. The table below presents the major types of diabetes, by chapters, in both ICD coding versions. Diabetes Coding Comparison ICD-9-CM ICD-10-CM 249._ - Secondary diabetes mellitus E08._ - Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E09._ - Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus E13._ - Other specified diabetes mellitus 250._ - Diabetes mellitus E10._ - Type 1 diabetes mellitus E11._ - Type 2 diabetes mellitus 648._ - Diabetes mellitus of mother, complicating pregnancy, childbirth, or the puerperium O24._ - Gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnancy 775.1 - Neonatal diabetes mellitus P70.2 - Neonatal diabetes mellitus This coding structure for diabetes in ICD-10 is very important to understand and remember, as it is virtually always the starting point in assigning codes for all patient encounters seen and treated for diabetes. How To Code in ICD-10 For Diabetes 1. Determine Diabetes Category Again, "category" here refers to the four major groups above (not just to type 1 or 2 diabetes): E08 - Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E09 - Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus E10 - Type 1 diabetes mellitus E11 - Type 2 diabetes mellitus E13 - Other specified diabetes mellitus Note that, for some reason, E12 has been skipped. Instructions on Diabetes Categories Here are some basic instructions on how to code for each of the diabetes categories above: E08 - Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition. Here, it is Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E11.65

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E11.65

Convert to ICD-9 Synonyms Diabetic - poor control Diabetic severe hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Hyperglycemic crisis in diabetes mellitus Pregestational diabetes mellitus AND/OR impaired glucose tolerance, modified White class D Pregestational diabetes mellitus AND/OR impaired glucose tolerance, modified White class FR Type II diabetes mellitus uncontrolled Diabetes Type 2 Also called: Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include Being very thirsty Urinating often Feeling very hungry or tired Losing weight without trying Having sores that heal slowly Having blurry eyesight Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases A1C test (Medical Encyclopedia) Choose More than 50 Ways to Prev Continue reading >>

Search Page 1/20: Diabetes Type 2 Uncontrolled

Search Page 1/20: Diabetes Type 2 Uncontrolled

Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathy, unsp; Diabetes 2, with neurogenic erectile dysfunction; Diabetes type 2 with peripheral neuropathy; Diabetes type 2 with peripheral sensory neuropathy; Diabetes type2 with neuropathy; Diabetic peripheral neuropathy associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus; Dm 2 with neuropathic ulcer foot and heel; Neurogenic erectile dysfunction due to type 2 diabetes mellitus; Neuropathic midfoot and/or heel ulcer due to type 2 diabetes mellitus; Neuropathy due to type 2 diabetes mellitus; Peripheral neuropathy due to type 2 diabetes mellitus; Peripheral sensory neuropathy due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic neurological complication Type 2 diabetes w oth diabetic neurological complication; Cranial nerve palsy due to type 2 diabetes mellitus; Diabetes type 2 with cranial nerve palsy; Diabetes type 2 with neurologic disorder; Diabetes type 2 with neuropathic ulcer of ankle; Diabetes type 2 with neuropathic ulcer of foot; Diabetes type 2 with neuropathic ulcer of toe; Neurologic disorder associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus; Neurologic disorder associated with type ii diabetes mellitus; Neuropathic ankle ulcer due to type 2 diabetes mellitus; Neuropathic foot ulcer due to type 2 diabetes mellitus; Neuropathic toe ulcer due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other circulatory complications Type 2 diabetes mellitus with oth circulatory complications; Diabetes type 2 w ischemic ulcer of midfoot and heel; Diabetes type 2 with ischemic ulcer of ankle; Diabetes type 2 with ischemic ulcer of foot; Diabetes type 2 with ischemic ulcer of toe; Diabetes type 2 with statis ulcer; Ischemic ankle ulcer due to type 2 diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Icd-9-cm Vs. Icd-10-cm

Diabetes Mellitus: Icd-9-cm Vs. Icd-10-cm

There are significant changes related to diabetes between the two code sets. Let’s discuss some of the differences. Number of categories: ICD-9-CM ICD-10-CM 249 - secondary diabetes mellitus 250 – diabetes mellitus E08 – diabetes mellitus due to underlying conditions E09 – drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus E10 – Type 1 diabetes mellitus E11 – type 2 diabetes mellitus E13 – other specified diabetes mellitus In ICD-9-CM, the codes identify the complication/manifestation associated with diabetes. In ICD-10-CM, there are combination codes that identify the type of diabetes as well as the complication/manifestation. For example, patient with Type II diabetes with diabetic neuropathy: ICD-9-CM ICD-10-CM 250.60 – diabetes with neurological manifestations, Type II, not stated as uncontrolled 357.2 – polyneuropathy in diabetes E11.40 – Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic neuropathy, unspecified Notice that ICD-9-CM uses Roman numerals whereas ICD-10-CM uses Arabic numbers when differentiating between the types of diabetes. As noted above, the type of diabetes is included in category E11 in ICD-10-CM whereas it is captured with fifth digit “0” in ICD-9-CM. ICD-10-CM no longer classifies diabetes as “controlled” or “uncontrolled,” however the Alphabetic Index does index the terms “inadequately controlled,” “out of control,” and “poorly controlled.” For these terms, the index provides the following information “code to Diabetes, by type, with hyperglycemia.” Let’s code the following example in both ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM: 56 year-old female with Type 2 Diabetes with diabetic neuropathy, uncontrolled ICD-9-CM ICD-10-CM 250.62 – Diabetes with neurological manifestations, Type II, uncontrolled 357.2 – polyneuropathy in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Hyperglycemia

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Hyperglycemia

E11.65 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E11.65 - other international versions of ICD-10 E11.65 may differ. Approximate Synonyms Diabetes type 2 with hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus ICD-10-CM E11.65 is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v35.0): Code History 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM) 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes. Continue reading >>

Icd-9-cm Vs. Icd-10-cm: Examine The Differences In Diabetes Coding

Icd-9-cm Vs. Icd-10-cm: Examine The Differences In Diabetes Coding

Most coders can quickly come up with 250.00. And if the physician only documented diabetes mellitus, that’s the correct ICD-9-CM code. If a physician doesn’t document complications or type of diabetes, coders default to code 250.00 (diabetes mellitus without mention of complications), says Jill Young, CPC, CEDC, CIMC, president of Young Medical Consulting, LLC, in East Lansing, MI. However, 250.00 is not necessarily the best code to describe the patient’s actual condition. Consider these two patients. Patient A is a type 2 diabetic with well controlled diabetes. Patient B is a type 2 diabetic with uncontrolled diabetes who also suffers from diabetes-related chronic kidney disease. If the physician documents “diabetes mellitus” for both patients, coders would report the same code, even though the patients have very different conditions. The physician loses reimbursement on Patient B, who is sicker and requires more care, Young says. Coding in ICD-9-CM When it comes to the code assignment for diabetes mellitus in ICD-9-CM (250 code series), coders identify whether the diabetes is type 1or 2 using a fifth digit, says Shannon E. McCall, RHIA, CCS, CCS-P, CPC, CPC-I, CEMC, CCDS, director of HIM/coding for HCPro, Inc., in Danvers, Mass, and an AHIMA-approved ICD-10-CM/PCS trainer. If the diabetes is secondary, coders choose from codes in the 249 series. Under series 250, coders will find 10 different subcategories that further define and refine the patient’s actual condition. All of those codes require a fifth digit to indicate whether the diabetes is controlled or uncontrolled, type 1or type 2. The fifth digit subclassifications are: Coders also need to note that codes 250.4, 250.5, 250.6, 250.7, and 250.8 all include instructions to use an additional code to ide Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm: Improved Coding For Diabetes Mellitus Complements Present Medical Science

Results of a recent coding and clinical documentation pilot study indicate that the ICD-10-CM coding classification changes made for diabetes mellitus have significantly improved coding for this disease. The results of the study noted that although a few ICD-10-CM "unspecified" diabetes codes were assigned, the majority of the diabetes codes sufficiently captured the diagnoses as expressed in the clinical documentation. In addition, the pilot study noted that the ICD-10-CM diabetes codes complement present medical science-separate type 1 and type 2 diabetes category codes and body system combination codes are a major improvement over ICD-9-CM. Instead of classifying as controlled or uncontrolled, ICD-10-CM classifies inadequately controlled, out of control, and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus by type with hyperglycemia. This article highlights key ICD-10-CM features for diabetes mellitus coding. In ICD-10-CM, chapter 4, "Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E89)," includes a separate subchapter (block), Diabetes mellitus E08-E13, with the categories: E08, Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition E09, Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus E10, Type 1 diabetes mellitus E11, Type 2 diabetes mellitus E13, Other specified diabetes mellitus The diabetes mellitus categories E08–E13 are further subdivided into four- or five-character subcategories. When a category has been subdivided into four-, five-, or six-character codes, the diabetes code assigned represents the highest level of specificity within ICD-10-CM. ICD-10-CM Tabular Instructional Notes Diabetes mellitus tabular inclusions notes are introduced by the term "Includes" and appear at the beginning of a category. Categories E10–E13 inclusion notes further define or provide examples of th Continue reading >>

Icd-10-cm Diabetes Diag Codes

Icd-10-cm Diabetes Diag Codes

The discharge ICD-10-CM codes included in this spreadsheet are acceptable for use to answer "YES" to "Diabetes Mellitus" to complete the NHSN Operative Procedure Details. The definition excludes patients who receive insulin for perioperative control of hyperglycemia but have no diagnosis of diabetes. (reviewed 11012016) ICD-10-CM DIABETES DIAGNOSES CODES DESCRIPTIONS E10.10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma E10.11 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with coma E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephropathy E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chronic kidney disease E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic kidney complication E10.311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.321 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.329 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.331 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.339 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.341 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.349 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.351 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema E10.359 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema E10.36 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract E10.39 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ophthalmic Continue reading >>

New Icd-10-cm Codes For Diabetes Self-management Training

New Icd-10-cm Codes For Diabetes Self-management Training

ICD (International Classification of Diseases) codes are used by physicians and medical coders to assign medical diagnoses and report inpatient procedures. The ICD-9 code sets will be replaced by ICD-10 code •ICD-10-CM diagnosis coding which is for use in all U.S. health care settings. •ICD-10-PCS inpatient procedure coding which is for use in U.S. hospital settings. ICD-10-CM is for use in all U.S. health care settings. Diagnosis coding under ICD-10-CM uses 3 to 7 digits instead of the 3 to 5 digits used with ICD-9-CM, but the format of the code sets is similar. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes will continue to be used for physician and outpatient services. It is important to note that the conversion to ICD-10 is not intended to impact payment levels, but claims could be denied if not coded correctly. It is not within the scope of practice of a diabetes educator to make a medical diagnosis. Diabetes educators may use this list to customize paper and electronic forms within their DSME programs to facilitate referrals for DSMT or MNT services and the development of super bills. Due to the large increase in the number of diagnosis codes in the ICD-10-CM code set as compared to the ICD-9-CM code set, mapping is not a straightforward correlation between codes of the two classification systems. In certain circumstances, the relationships and linkages between code sets are fairly close – at times a one-to-one correlation. The ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes listed below are a representative list of diagnosis codes for which individuals may be referred to a diabetes educator for self-management education. The list is not meant to be all-inclusive. Additional ICD-10-CM codes can be found at: All of the ICD-10-CM codes listed below have additional digit Continue reading >>

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