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Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome Vs Dka

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DKA (Diabetic Ketoacidosis) Vs HHNS (Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome) Tables From Step Up to Medicine (3rd Edition, Agabegi) Here is the link for the Quick Hits =) http://imgur.com/TnJPBmu

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome

Volume 29, Issue 4 , 1 December 2000, Pages 683-705 DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS AND HYPERGLYCEMIC HYPEROSMOLAR NONKETOTIC SYNDROME Author links open overlay panel Miriam F.DelaneyMB, BCha ArielZismanMDa William M.KettyleMDb Get rights and content Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) are life-threatening acute metabolic complications of diabetes mellitus. Although there are some important differences, the pathophysiology, the presenting clinical challenge, and the treatment of these metabolic derangements are similar. Insulin deficiency, either relative or absolute, and elevated levels of stress-responding, counterregulatory hormones (e.g., glucagon, catecholamines, growth hormone, and cortisol) are the hallmarks of these conditions. Each of these complications can be seen in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, although DKA is usually seen in patients with type 1 diabetes and HHNS in patients with type 2 disease. The clinical management of these syndromes involves careful evaluation and correction of the metabolic and volume status of the patient, identification and treatment of precipitating and comorbid conditions, a smooth transition to a long- Continue reading >>

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  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
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Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS or HHS) nursing diabetes & pathophysiology NCLEX review on endocrine disorders of the body. HHNS vs DKA are two complications of diabetes mellitus. HHNS presents with extreme hyperglycemia (blood glucose greater than 600 mg/dL) and dehyrdation. Ketones and acidosis are not present in this condition as with diabetic ketoacidosis. The hyperglycemia hyperosmolar state can lead to a coma and even death if not treated promptly. HHNS treatment includes intravenous fluids, insulin therapy,and electrolyte replacement. This video will highlight the patho, causes, signs and symptoms, and nursing interventions for HHS. Please see the previous videos on DKA and DKA vs HHS (see the playlist below) Quiz on HHNS: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Lecture Notes for this Video: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Diabetes Lecture Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, sala

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) are life-threatening acute metabolic complications of diabetes mellitus. Although there are some important differences, the pathophysiology, the presenting clinical challenge, and the treatment of these metabolic derangements are similar. Each of these complications can be seen in type 1 or type 2 diabetes, although DKA is usually seen in patients with type 1 diabetes and HHNS in patients with type 2 disease. The clinical management of these syndromes involves careful evaluation and correction of the metabolic and volume status of the patient, identification and treatment of precipitating and comorbid conditions, a smooth transition to a long-term treatment regimen, and a plan to prevent recurrence. Do you want to read the rest of this article? ... pathophysiological mechanisms are best described in DKA, in which acute insulin deficiency results in an increase in free fatty acid production. This leads to excess ketone body production, reduced urinary clearance, and resultant metabolic acidosis.[4]HHS is characterized by marked hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity, the combination of which leads to o Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
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Hyperglycemic crises: Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HHNK) versus DKA. See DKA video here: https://youtu.be/r2tXTjb7EqU This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/g... Voice by: Penelope Hammet Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or HHS, is another ACUTE and life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. It develops slower than DKA, typically in the course of several days, but has a much higher mortality rate. Like DKA, HHS is triggered when diabetic patients suffer from ADDITIONAL physiologic stress such as infections, other illness, INadequate diabetic treatment or certain drugs. Similar to DKA, the RISE in COUNTER-regulatory hormones is the major culprit. These hormones

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Author: Dipa Avichal, DO; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) isone of two serious metabolic derangements that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). [ 1 ] It is alife-threatening emergency that, although less common than its counterpart, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), has a much higher mortality rate, reaching up to 5-10%. (See Epidemiology.) HHS was previously termed hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic coma (HHNC); however, the terminology was changed because coma is found in fewer than 20% of patients with HHS. [ 2 ] HHS is most commonly seen in patients with type 2DM who have some concomitant illness that leads to reduced fluid intake, as seen, for example, in elderly institutionalizedpersons with decreased thirst perception andreduced ability to drink water. [ 3 ] Infection is the most common preceding illness, but many other conditions, such as stroke or myocardial infarction, can cause this state. [ 3 ] Once HHS has developed, it may be difficult to identify or differentiate it from the antecedent illness. (See Etiology.) HHS is characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperosmolarity, and dehydration without significant ketoac Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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