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Hyperkalemia In Dka

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

1352: Is Early Dialysis Indicated In Severe Hyperkalemia Associated With Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

1Wellstar Atlanta Medical Center, Atlanta, GA Learning Objectives: Hyperkalemia is a common lab abnormality in patients who present with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). It is mostly due to the underlying acidosis that causes intracellular potassium to shift into the extracellular space and usually corrects itself once acidosis improves. However, severe hyperkalemia which may be multi-factorial should be promptly identified and treated accordingly. Methods: A 44 years old African American male with history of type 1 diabetes mellitus and gastroparesis presented with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain for two days. He was found on the ground by his mother, very weak and lethargic but arouse-able. Patients mother did not report any other symptoms. His only other history was hypertension and he was compliant with his home regimen of insulin and anti-hypertensives which included Lisinopril. On examination, patient was tachycardic, had dry mucus membranes, diffuse abdominal tenderness and had a port on his chest which was placed due to his recurrent episodes of DKA. He was anuric on admission and his lab values were significant for Na 126, K 9.0, Cl 87, CO2 7.4, BUN 87, creatinine 5.6 and Continue reading >>

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  1. nurseprnRN

    The hypokalemia comes when the patient gets treated with insulin, driving the glucose and K+ into the cells. The kidneys can't (and won't) move so much out through urine with the excess glucose to make for hypokalemia.

  2. Esme12

    There can be a brief period of hypoglycemia in the early stages of an elevated blood sugar (polyuria)....but by the time "ketoacidosis" sets in the Serum potassium is elevated but the cellular potassium is depleted (all that shifting that goes on)
    Diabetic ketoacidosis

  3. April2152

    So pretty much what we would observe clinically is hyperkalemia because the osmotic duiresis does not move serum potassium significantly?

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This animated video presentation is about potassium regulation and the pathophsyiology of hyperkalemia to make it easy to follow and understand the causes and the management of Hyperkalemia. email : [email protected]

Hyperkalemia In A Dka Patient

A gathering place for instructors of ECG and cardiac topics. "The ECG Guru provides free resources for you to use. Help us keep the lights on and we'll keep bringing you the quality content that you love!" ECG & Illustrations Archives Search (scrollable list) For your collection, we present another interesting set of ECGs from Paramedic Erik Testerman. They are from a 48 year old man who presented responsive only to painful stimuli, with deep, rapid (Kussmaul's) respirations. His blood glucose in the field read as "HIGH" - too high for the glucometer to register a number. He was treated with 3 large-bore IVs, 2 liters of NSS IV, O2. At the hospital, his blood glucose again registered as "HIGH" on the glucometer, arterial O2 was 90%, CO2 15 (low), pH 6.8 (acidotic), HCO3 -2 (depleted). His serum potassium was 7.0 ( greater than 5.5 is high ). We do not have the rest of his chemistry panel. The first ECG, at 5:59 am, shows some signs of early hyperkalemia. One of these signs iswide QRS, at .188 sec (normal is less than .12). This ECG even meets the criteria for LBBB, as noted in the machine's interpretation, but the widening is more likely due to the high potassium. There is a right Continue reading >>

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  1. metalmd06

    Does acute DKA cause hyperkalemia, or is the potassium normal or low due to osmotic diuresis? I get the acute affect of metabolic acidosis on potassium (K+ shifts from intracellular to extracellular compartments). According to MedEssentials, the initial response (<24 hours) is increased serum potassium. The chronic effect occuring within 24 hours is a compensatory increase in Aldosterone that normalizes or ultimatley decreases the serum K+. Then it says on another page that because of osmotic diuresis, there is K+ wasting with DKA. On top of that, I had a question about a diabetic patient in DKA with signs of hyperkalemia. Needless to say, I'm a bit confused. Any help is appreciated.

  2. FutureDoc4

    I remember this being a tricky point:
    1) DKA leads to a decreased TOTAL body K+ (due to diuresis) (increase urine flow, increase K+ loss)
    2) Like you said, during DKA, acidosis causes an exchange of H+/K+ leading to hyperkalemia.
    So, TOTAL body K+ is low, but the patient presents with hyperkalemia. Why is this important? Give, insulin, pushes the K+ back into the cells and can quickly precipitate hypokalemia and (which we all know is bad). Hope that is helpful.

  3. Cooolguy

    DKA-->Anion gap M. Acidosis-->K+ shift to extracellular component--> hyperkalemia-->symptoms and signs
    DKA--> increased osmoles-->Osmotic diuresis-->loss of K+ in urine-->decreased total body K+ (because more has been seeped from the cells)
    --dont confuse total body K+ with EC K+
    Note: osmotic diuresis also causes polyuria, ketonuria, glycosuria, and loss of Na+ in urine--> Hyponatremia
    DKA tx: Insulin (helps put K+ back into cells), and K+ (to replenish the low total potassium
    Hope it helps

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High Potassium, Hyperkalemia what is, treatment, management, ecg, symptoms, cause of hyperkalemia. electrolyte imbalances

Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Sciencedirect

Volume 299, Issue 3 , March 1990, Pages 164-169 Author links open overlay panel MilfordFulopMD Get rights and content Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis tend to have somewhat elevated serum K+ concentrations despite decreased body K+ content. The hyperkalemia was previously attributed mainly to acidemia. However, recent studies have suggested that organic acidemias (such as that produced by infusing beta-hydroxybutyric acid) may not cause hyperkalemia. To learn which, if any, routinely measured biochemical indices might correlate with the finding of hyperkalemia in diabetic ketoacidosis, we analyzed the initial pre-treatment values in 131 episodes in 91 patients. Serum K+correlated independently and significantly (p < 0.001) with blood pH (r = 0.39), serum urea N (r = 0.38) and the anion gap (r = 0.41). The mean serum K+ among the men was 5.55 mmol/ 1, significantly higher than among the women, 5.09 mmol/1 (p < 0.005). Twelve of the 16 patients with serum K+ 6.5 mmol/1 were men, as were all eight patients with serum K+ 7.0 mmol/1. Those differences paralleled a significantly higher mean serum urea N concentration among the men (15.1 mmol/1) than the women (11.2 mmol/1, p < 0.01). Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. nurseprnRN

    The hypokalemia comes when the patient gets treated with insulin, driving the glucose and K+ into the cells. The kidneys can't (and won't) move so much out through urine with the excess glucose to make for hypokalemia.

  2. Esme12

    There can be a brief period of hypoglycemia in the early stages of an elevated blood sugar (polyuria)....but by the time "ketoacidosis" sets in the Serum potassium is elevated but the cellular potassium is depleted (all that shifting that goes on)
    Diabetic ketoacidosis

  3. April2152

    So pretty much what we would observe clinically is hyperkalemia because the osmotic duiresis does not move serum potassium significantly?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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