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Hyperglycemic Seizures

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Non-ketotic Hyperglycemia And Recurrent Seizures.

Nagaraja D; Taly AB; Rao TV; Joshy EV Departments of Neurology and Neuropathology, National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, Bangalore - 560 029, India. Non-ketotic hyperglycemia and recurrent seizures. NIMHANS Journal. 1996 Jan; 14(1): 9-13 ABSTRACT: Non-ketotic hyperglycemia (NKHC) is an important cause of recurrent convulsions in the middle aged and elderly persons. Thirty-two patients (17 men, 15 women) with an average age of 58.6 yrs with recurrent convulsions and NKHC admitted to NIMHANS over a period of 8 years are discussed here. Fifteen patients were known hypertensives and fourteen patients were known diabetics, on irregular medication. Four persons had a history of TIA / RIND and 5 persons had seizures some time in their past. Twenty-nine persons presented with recurrent focal motor seizures with or without generalization while only 3 patients presented with generalized seizures. Hyperglycemia (average blood sugar 542 mg) and hyperosmolarity (average 322) were observed in all. Seizures were controlled only after control of metabolic parameters. Radiological investigations - CT (7), angiogram (5) and partial autopsy of the brain (3) did not reveal any evidence Continue reading >>

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  1. RobinN

    Quote :

    The important new finding from Schwechter and colleagues is that hyperglycemia, itself, is proconvulsant. How can elevated glucose enhance seizure susceptibility? The answer to this crucial question regarding the mechanism of action awaits further research, as the mechanism per se is not addressed in this report. However, one clue to the answer might be gleaned from the authors's observation that hypoglycemia was associated with a higher seizure threshold. Other studies have indicated that restricting calories, thus inducing hypoglycemia, in the epilepsy-prone EL mouse also reduces seizure susceptibility (2). With any model that induces hypoglycemia, the role of ketosis must be excluded, as ketones themselves can affect seizure threshold (3). Moreover, multiple other mechanisms could explain hypoglycemia- and hyperglycemia-induced alterations of neuronal excitability. Furthermore, the effects of age on glucose balance and neuronal excitability must be delineated, as children with diabetes tend to develop seizures with hypoglycemia rather than with hyperglycemia. In addition to clarifying further the relation between hyperglycemia and seizures, Schwechter et al. highlight the link between metabolism and neuronal excitability and emphasize the need for further research on the long-term effects of hyperglycemia on various aspects of brain function.
    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...i?artid=387262

  2. Nakamova

    I have the opposite experience -- for me, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is a seizure trigger, it lowers my seizure threshold....

  3. RobinN

    Yes I am doing some research on this, as the same seems to be true for my daughter as well.
    Her blood sugar is dropping before a seizure and then sometime spiking after.
    Though her last seizure when 911 was called it went down to 30. So we had a glucose tolerance test and it was at 50 on the last blood draw.
    I am reading conflicting information. Which only proves to me that they don't know much about this or why it really occurs.
    Can you tell me what you have done to try to remedy your situation. How do you manage it?
    Have you made nutritional changes?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
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Journal Of The American Podiatric Medical Association

Focal epileptic seizures can be the first manifestation of a diabetic disorder. Metabolic disturbances, including hyperglycemia, mild hyperosmolality, hyponatremia, and lack of ketoacidosis contribute to the development of partial focal seizures. A review of the medical literature for partial focal seizures is presented, followed by a case study of a patient who developed clonic seizures of the right foot secondary to hyperglycemia, hyponatremia, and hyperosmolality. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 92(2): 109-111, 2002) Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RobinN

    Quote :

    The important new finding from Schwechter and colleagues is that hyperglycemia, itself, is proconvulsant. How can elevated glucose enhance seizure susceptibility? The answer to this crucial question regarding the mechanism of action awaits further research, as the mechanism per se is not addressed in this report. However, one clue to the answer might be gleaned from the authors's observation that hypoglycemia was associated with a higher seizure threshold. Other studies have indicated that restricting calories, thus inducing hypoglycemia, in the epilepsy-prone EL mouse also reduces seizure susceptibility (2). With any model that induces hypoglycemia, the role of ketosis must be excluded, as ketones themselves can affect seizure threshold (3). Moreover, multiple other mechanisms could explain hypoglycemia- and hyperglycemia-induced alterations of neuronal excitability. Furthermore, the effects of age on glucose balance and neuronal excitability must be delineated, as children with diabetes tend to develop seizures with hypoglycemia rather than with hyperglycemia. In addition to clarifying further the relation between hyperglycemia and seizures, Schwechter et al. highlight the link between metabolism and neuronal excitability and emphasize the need for further research on the long-term effects of hyperglycemia on various aspects of brain function.
    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...i?artid=387262

  2. Nakamova

    I have the opposite experience -- for me, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is a seizure trigger, it lowers my seizure threshold....

  3. RobinN

    Yes I am doing some research on this, as the same seems to be true for my daughter as well.
    Her blood sugar is dropping before a seizure and then sometime spiking after.
    Though her last seizure when 911 was called it went down to 30. So we had a glucose tolerance test and it was at 50 on the last blood draw.
    I am reading conflicting information. Which only proves to me that they don't know much about this or why it really occurs.
    Can you tell me what you have done to try to remedy your situation. How do you manage it?
    Have you made nutritional changes?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
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Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome As The Initial Manifestation Of A Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Copyright © 2014 Karla Victoria Rodríguez-Velver et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a life-threatening demyelinating syndrome. The association of ODS with hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) has been seldom reported. The aim of this study was to present and discuss previous cases and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in ODS secondary to HHS. A 47-year-old man arrived to the emergency room due to generalized tonic-clonic seizures and altered mental status. The patient was lethargic and had a Glasgow coma scale of 11/15, muscle strength was 4/5 in both lower extremities, and deep tendon reflexes were diminished. Glucose was 838 mg/dL; serum sodium and venous blood gas analyses were normal. Urinary and plasma ketones were negative. Brain magnetic resonance revealed increased signal intensity on T2-weighted FLAIR images with restricted diffusion on the medulla and central pons. Supportive therapy was started and during the next 3 weeks the Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RobinN

    Quote :

    The important new finding from Schwechter and colleagues is that hyperglycemia, itself, is proconvulsant. How can elevated glucose enhance seizure susceptibility? The answer to this crucial question regarding the mechanism of action awaits further research, as the mechanism per se is not addressed in this report. However, one clue to the answer might be gleaned from the authors's observation that hypoglycemia was associated with a higher seizure threshold. Other studies have indicated that restricting calories, thus inducing hypoglycemia, in the epilepsy-prone EL mouse also reduces seizure susceptibility (2). With any model that induces hypoglycemia, the role of ketosis must be excluded, as ketones themselves can affect seizure threshold (3). Moreover, multiple other mechanisms could explain hypoglycemia- and hyperglycemia-induced alterations of neuronal excitability. Furthermore, the effects of age on glucose balance and neuronal excitability must be delineated, as children with diabetes tend to develop seizures with hypoglycemia rather than with hyperglycemia. In addition to clarifying further the relation between hyperglycemia and seizures, Schwechter et al. highlight the link between metabolism and neuronal excitability and emphasize the need for further research on the long-term effects of hyperglycemia on various aspects of brain function.
    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...i?artid=387262

  2. Nakamova

    I have the opposite experience -- for me, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is a seizure trigger, it lowers my seizure threshold....

  3. RobinN

    Yes I am doing some research on this, as the same seems to be true for my daughter as well.
    Her blood sugar is dropping before a seizure and then sometime spiking after.
    Though her last seizure when 911 was called it went down to 30. So we had a glucose tolerance test and it was at 50 on the last blood draw.
    I am reading conflicting information. Which only proves to me that they don't know much about this or why it really occurs.
    Can you tell me what you have done to try to remedy your situation. How do you manage it?
    Have you made nutritional changes?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

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