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Hyperglycemia Signs And Symptoms

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

Postprandial Hyperglycemia: Signs, Symptoms And Treatment

Postprandial Hyperglycemia: Signs, Symptoms And Treatment

What is postprandial hyperglycemia? It is a condition where a person has extremely high blood glucose after eating a meal. Typically, blood glucose levels rise slightly after eating food. Glucose is a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy for the body. We get glucose from carbohydrate-rich foods, such as rice, bread, milk and potatoes. When we eat these foods, our body breaks it down into glucose that is then transported to various body tissues via the bloodstream. However, for glucose to enter the cells of the body to be used for energy, it requires insulin. Insulin is a natural hormone which is produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. This naturally occurring hormone is responsible for transporting glucose into body’s tissues such as fat and muscle cells. People who do not have diabetes are able to naturally produce insulin. On the other hand, people with type 2 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin after meals. Because of this, they may experience postprandial hyperglycemia (post-meal). You are considered to have postprandial hyperglycemia when your blood glucose levels go above 180 mg/dL. For non-diabetics, blood glucose levels rarely go beyond 140 mg/dL after eating. However, if you eat a large meal that contains a high amount of carbohydrates, your postprandial glucose levels can go up to 180 mg/DL. Post-prandial hyperglycemia is a challenge for people with diabetes who are aiming to achieve a stable blood sugar level. High blood glucose levels can lead to serious health complications including damage to nerves, kidneys and blood vessels. People with diabetes may take insulin injections to help them stabilize their blood glucose levels. Signs and Symptoms Various factors can contribute to symptoms of post-meal. People who are experiencing Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia - Hyperglycemia

Low blood sugar – hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia means "low blood glucose." It is sometimes called a "hypo" and it can happen at any time during the day or night. You suffer from hypoglycemia when your body has insufficient sugar to use as energy, or when your blood glucose level is 70 mg/dL and below. Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar include: Sudden, extreme hunger Headache Blurred vision Trembling Weakness/tiredness Cold sweat Fast heartbeat Anxiety/nervousness Irritability What to do if you have low blood sugar: Check your blood sugar to confirm that your blood glucose is 70 mg/dL or below. Apply the 15/15 rule: Have 15 grams of a quick-acting carbohydrate, for example: a glass of fruit juice; three to four teaspoons (1 tablespoon) of sugar in water; or five-six hard candies. Or-- you can take glucose gel or glucose tablets (see label for 15g amount) Wait 15 minutes and check your blood sugar again. If your blood glucose level is still low, continue to: Alternate 15 grams of glucose with waiting 15 minutes to test your blood glucose until it reaches an acceptable target. Be sure to eat your next meal to prevent another low blood sugar reaction. If symptoms persist, call your doctor. High blood glucose – hyperglycemia High blood glucose can occur when your food, activity and medication are not balanced: too much food, not enough activity and not enough medicine. It can also happen when you are unwell or under stress. If you have high blood glucose levels, you may be more prone to infection. And an infection can cause your blood glucose level to rise even more. Signs of hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia or high blood glucose is a key indicator of diabetes and therefore, the symptoms are the same as the symptoms of diabetes. These include: Frequent urination Excessive thi Continue reading >>

Neonatal Hyperglycemia

Neonatal Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia is a serum glucose concentration > 150 mg/dL (> 8.3 mmol/L). The most common cause of neonatal hyperglycemia is Iatrogenic causes usually involve too-rapid IV infusions of dextrose during the first few days of life in very low-birth-weight infants (< 1.5 kg). The other important cause is physiologic stress caused by surgery, hypoxia, respiratory distress syndrome, or sepsis; fungal sepsis poses a special risk. In premature infants, partially defective processing of proinsulin to insulin and relative insulin resistance may cause hyperglycemia. In addition, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus is a rare self-limited cause that usually occurs in small-for-gestational-age infants; corticosteroid therapy may also result in transient hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia is less common than hypoglycemia, but it is important because it increases morbidity and mortality of the underlying causes. Treatment of iatrogenic hyperglycemia is reduction of the IV dextrose concentration (eg, from 10% to 5%) or of the infusion rate; hyperglycemia persisting at low dextrose infusion rates (eg, 4 mg/kg/min) may indicate relative insulin deficiency or insulin resistance. Treatment of other causes is fast-acting insulin. One approach is to add fast-acting insulin to an IV infusion of 10% dextrose at a uniform rate of 0.01 to 0.1 unit/kg/h, then titrate the rate until the glucose level is normalized. Another approach is to add insulin to a separate IV of 10% D/W given simultaneously with the maintenance IV infusion so that the insulin can be adjusted without changing the total infusion rate. Responses to insulin are unpredictable, and it is extremely important to monitor serum glucose levels and to titrate the insulin infusion rate carefully. In transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, gluc Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Symptoms And Signs Of High Blood Glucose Levels

Hyperglycemia Symptoms And Signs Of High Blood Glucose Levels

Hyperglycemia is the term for abnormally high blood glucose levels. In a person without diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes), hyperglycemia is unlikely to occur unless it is triggered by severe stress, injury or the use of medication. Even in these instances, it is temporary and will quickly resolve, with or without medical intervention, once the causative factors are removed or neutralized. With diabetes mellitus, however, hyperglycemia persists for prolonged periods of time due to the lack of insulin or inability of insulin to act and reduce the blood glucose levels. Hypoglycemia on the other end is abnormally low blood glucose levels and occurs frequently if food intake is minimal even without any underlying pathology. There is a common misconception that the blood glucose level in a healthy person spikes well beyond the norm after meals. This, however, is untrue. While the blood glucose levels may reach the upper limits of the normal range, the body’s regulating mechanisms ensure that normal levels are maintained. Excessively high blood glucose levels can disrupt homeostasis and cause cell damage so the body ensures that this is avoided. It is able to do this by stimulating the cells to take up glucose from the blood stream, promote glucose storage, reduce gastric emptying and intestinal absorption as well as affecting the appetite to limit further food intake. This is explained in detail under normal blood glucose. The blood glucose levels are not static and fluctuate throughout the day. The body aims to maintain a blood glucose level within a minimum of 70mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L) to a maximum of 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). Usually these extremes are not reached and the levels are maintained between 90mg/dL and 120mg/dL. The lowest glucose levels are recorded prior to meals Continue reading >>

Causes And Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar Or Hyperglycemia

Causes And Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar Or Hyperglycemia

Blood sugar and its control is at the center of any diabetes treatment but it isn’t necessarily indicative of diabetes. High sugar consumption is a worldwide problem and it is only in recent history that the medical profession has become alive to the dangers of our sugar consumption. High blood sugar can lead to damage to the blood vessels, nerves and internal organs and can of course lead to diabetes which can be a life threatening illness if not closely monitored. High blood sugar levels if they remain untreated can cause both short term effects and long term damage. Over the short term it wont damage the organs but it can lead to fatigue, thirstiness,high urination levels and lead you prone to infections and can even cause vision problems. If you have high blood sugar levels for a sustained period then you may find that you start to suffer from the classic association and complications of diabetes. Clearly we need glucose or sugar in our blood and it serves a useful purpose. Moderate levels act as the fuel our bodies need to stay active and healthy and the brain requires sugar constantly to produce energy. Sugar and oxygen in our blood is necessary to our wellbeing and some levels of sugar will always be found in our blood. Too low a level and our brain doesnt get enough and we can be prone to dizzy spells, tooo much and it can eventually lead to diabetes. The levels in our blood is controlled by insulin and Oceans Bounty Blood sugar supplement has recognized that if the insulin produced by our body is inefficient at controlling those blood sugar levels then a condition known as hyperglycemia can develop. This blood sugar supplement from oceans bounty acts as a natural insulin and provides additional nutrients to support the body in its efforts to control the blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Tweet Hyperglycemia occurs when people with diabetes have too much sugar in their bloodstream. Hyperglycemia should not be confused with hypoglycemia, which is when blood sugar levels go too low. You should aim to avoid spending long periods of time with high blood glucose levels. What is hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia, the term for expressing high blood sugar, has been defined by the World Health Organisation as: Blood glucose levels greater than 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dl) when fasting Blood glucose levels greater than 11.0 mmol/L (200 mg/dl) 2 hours after meals Although blood sugar levels exceeding 7 mmol/L for extended periods of time can start to cause damage to internal organs, symptoms may not develop until blood glucose levels exceed 11 mmol/L. What causes hyperglycemia? The underlying cause of hyperglycemia will usually be from loss of insulin producing cells in the pancreas or if the body develops resistance to insulin. More immediate reasons for hyperglycemia include: Missing a dose of diabetic medication, tablets or insulin Eating more carbohydrates than your body and/or medication can manage Being mentally or emotionally stressed (injury, surgery or anxiety) Contracting an infection What are the symptoms of hyperglycemia? The main 3 symptoms of high blood sugar levels are increased urination, increased thirst and increased hunger. High blood sugar levels can also contribute to the following symptoms: Regular/above-average urination Weakness or feeling tired Increased thirst Vision blurring Is hyperglycemia serious? Hyperglycemia can be serious if: Blood glucose levels stay high for extended periods of time - this can lead to the development of long term complications Blood glucose levels rise dangerously high - this can lead to short term complications In the shor Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia facts Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hyperglycemia

Nondiabetic Hyperglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is nondiabetic hyperglycemia? Nondiabetic hyperglycemia means your blood glucose (sugar) level is high even though you do not have diabetes. Hyperglycemia may happen suddenly during a major illness or injury. Instead, hyperglycemia may happen over a longer period of time and be caused by a chronic disease. Why is it important to manage hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia can increase your risk for infections, prevent healing, and it make it hard to manage your condition. It is important to treat hyperglycemia to prevent these problems. Hyperglycemia that is not treated can damage your nerves, blood vessels, tissues, and organs. Damage to arteries may increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. Nerve damage may also lead to other heart, stomach, and nerve problems. What increases my risk for nondiabetic hyperglycemia? A medical condition such as Cushing syndrome or polycystic ovarian syndrome Surgery or trauma, such as a burn or injury Infections, such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection Certain medicines, such as steroids or diuretics Nutrition given through a feeding tube or IV A family history of diabetes or gestational diabetes Obesity or a lack of physical activity What are the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia? You may not have any signs or symptoms, or you may have any of the following: More thirst than usual Frequent urination Blurred vision Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain How is nondiabetic hyperglycemia diagnosed and treated? Your healthcare provider will measure your blood sugar level with a blood test. You may be given insulin or other medicines to decrease your blood sugar level. How can I help prevent hyperglycemia? Exercise can help lower your blood sugar when it is high. It also can keep your blood sugar levels steady o Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Blood sugar control is at the center of any diabetes treatment plan. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is a major concern, and can affect people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes . There are two main kinds: Fasting hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 130 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) after not eating or drinking for at least 8 hours. Postprandial or after-meal hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 180 mg/dL 2 hours after you eat. People without diabetes rarely have blood sugar levels over 140 mg/dL after a meal, unless it’s really large. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar can cause damage to your nerves, blood vessels, and organs. It can also lead to other serious conditions. People with type 1 diabetes are prone to a build-up of acids in the blood called ketoacidosis. If you have type 2 diabetes or if you’re at risk for it, extremely high blood sugar can lead to a potentially deadly condition in which your body can’t process sugar. It's called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS). You’ll pee more often at first, and then less often later on, but your urine may become dark and you could get severely dehydrated. It's important to treat symptoms of high blood sugar right away to help prevent complications. Your blood sugar may rise if you: Eat too many grams of carbohydrates for the amount of insulin you took, or eat too many carbs in general Have an infection Are ill Are under stress Become inactive or exercise less than usual Take part in strenuous physical activity, especially when your blood sugar levels are high and insulin levels are low Early signs include: Increased thirst Trouble concentrating Frequent peeing Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blood sugar more than 180 mg/dL Ongoing high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes High Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes High Blood Sugar Symptoms

Wondering about the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia—or high blood sugar? High blood sugar occurs in type 1 diabetes when the body has too much glucose/food or not enough insulin. Having hyperglycemia symptoms doesn’t immediately put you in danger but regular high blood-sugar levels over time does. That’s because they can lead to complications including blindness, heart disease, kidney failure and amputation. What are the symptoms of high blood sugar? – Thirst – Frequent urination – Stomach pain – Blurry vision – Increased Hunger Other signs of hyperglycemia With high blood sugar, you may also experience drowsiness, exhaustion, nausea or vomiting, confusion, fruity or sweet-smelling breath, impaired concentration and sweating. And, having very high blood-glucose levels for an extended period can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA happens when the body starts to burn fat and body tissue for energy. This releases toxic acids called ketones that build up in the blood and urine—and can lead to a diabetic coma. So if you’re experiencing any of the above signs or symptoms, it’s important to get checked out by your doctor. The earlier high blood-sugar issues are treated, the better. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Children: Causes, Signs & Symptoms

Hyperglycemia In Children: Causes, Signs & Symptoms

Hyperglycemia can tremendously affect the future health of children worldwide. Read this lesson to learn what hyperglycemia is, its signs and symptoms, and major causes of this condition. Childhood Hyperglycemia An excess of circulating sugar in the blood is known as hyperglycemia. Sugar, or glucose, comes from our diet, and the glucose ingested by food or drink is normally broken down by the insulin hormone to be used as energy. Josh, a 7-year-old boy anxious to start the school year, has not felt like himself for quite a few weeks. His mom is concerned and schedules an appointment with the family doctor. Signs of Hyperglycemia Other than feeling fatigued and unusually thirsty, Josh and his mother have no other complaints. The doctor completes a physical exam finding Josh to be quite healthy despite the symptoms. Doctor Smith decides to ask a few questions to determine whether or not Josh may be presenting with hyperglycemia. Doctor Smith asks Josh and his mom if he is experiencing any of the other following symptoms of hyperglycemia: Increased urination Headaches Nausea or vomiting Dry mouth Stomach pains Doctor Smith suspects that Josh may be hyperglycemic, placing him at high risk for diabetes. Josh was able to explain that his head had been hurting, and his mom confirmed an increase in urination. Doctor Smith was concerned that Josh might be dealing with: Hyperglycemia- a condition resulting in high blood sugar levels, usually the result of poor diet and exercise routines, or Diabetes Type I- a disease in which the body's immune system attacks the pancreas, an organ that produces and secretes insulin Diabetes Type II- also described as varying degrees of insulin resistance, making it difficult to transport glucose into cells to be used as energy Josh was sent for b Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

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