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Hyperglycemia Signs And Symptoms

Hyperglycemia In Children: Causes, Signs & Symptoms

Hyperglycemia In Children: Causes, Signs & Symptoms

Hyperglycemia can tremendously affect the future health of children worldwide. Read this lesson to learn what hyperglycemia is, its signs and symptoms, and major causes of this condition. Childhood Hyperglycemia An excess of circulating sugar in the blood is known as hyperglycemia. Sugar, or glucose, comes from our diet, and the glucose ingested by food or drink is normally broken down by the insulin hormone to be used as energy. Josh, a 7-year-old boy anxious to start the school year, has not felt like himself for quite a few weeks. His mom is concerned and schedules an appointment with the family doctor. Signs of Hyperglycemia Other than feeling fatigued and unusually thirsty, Josh and his mother have no other complaints. The doctor completes a physical exam finding Josh to be quite healthy despite the symptoms. Doctor Smith decides to ask a few questions to determine whether or not Josh may be presenting with hyperglycemia. Doctor Smith asks Josh and his mom if he is experiencing any of the other following symptoms of hyperglycemia: Increased urination Headaches Nausea or vomiting Dry mouth Stomach pains Doctor Smith suspects that Josh may be hyperglycemic, placing him at high risk for diabetes. Josh was able to explain that his head had been hurting, and his mom confirmed an increase in urination. Doctor Smith was concerned that Josh might be dealing with: Hyperglycemia- a condition resulting in high blood sugar levels, usually the result of poor diet and exercise routines, or Diabetes Type I- a disease in which the body's immune system attacks the pancreas, an organ that produces and secretes insulin Diabetes Type II- also described as varying degrees of insulin resistance, making it difficult to transport glucose into cells to be used as energy Josh was sent for b Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Symptoms And Signs Of High Blood Glucose Levels

Hyperglycemia Symptoms And Signs Of High Blood Glucose Levels

Hyperglycemia is the term for abnormally high blood glucose levels. In a person without diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes), hyperglycemia is unlikely to occur unless it is triggered by severe stress, injury or the use of medication. Even in these instances, it is temporary and will quickly resolve, with or without medical intervention, once the causative factors are removed or neutralized. With diabetes mellitus, however, hyperglycemia persists for prolonged periods of time due to the lack of insulin or inability of insulin to act and reduce the blood glucose levels. Hypoglycemia on the other end is abnormally low blood glucose levels and occurs frequently if food intake is minimal even without any underlying pathology. There is a common misconception that the blood glucose level in a healthy person spikes well beyond the norm after meals. This, however, is untrue. While the blood glucose levels may reach the upper limits of the normal range, the body’s regulating mechanisms ensure that normal levels are maintained. Excessively high blood glucose levels can disrupt homeostasis and cause cell damage so the body ensures that this is avoided. It is able to do this by stimulating the cells to take up glucose from the blood stream, promote glucose storage, reduce gastric emptying and intestinal absorption as well as affecting the appetite to limit further food intake. This is explained in detail under normal blood glucose. The blood glucose levels are not static and fluctuate throughout the day. The body aims to maintain a blood glucose level within a minimum of 70mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L) to a maximum of 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). Usually these extremes are not reached and the levels are maintained between 90mg/dL and 120mg/dL. The lowest glucose levels are recorded prior to meals Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Symptoms

Hyperglycemia Symptoms

The basic defect in all patients with diabetes is the decreased ability of insulin to induce cells of the body to remove glucose (sugar) molecules from the blood. Whether this decreased insulin activity is due to a decreased amount of insulin produced (type 1 diabetes), or from the insensitivity of the cells to a normal amount of insulin (type 2 diabetes), the results are the same: blood glucose levels which are too high. This is termed "hyperglycemia" which means "high glucose in the blood." hyper = high, glyc = glucose, and emia = of the blood. What happens when you have hyperglycemia? Common Symptoms of Hyperglycemia The Classic Symptoms Polyphagia (frequently hungry) Polyuria (frequently urinating) Polydipsia (frequently thirsty) Other Symptoms Might Include Blurred vision Fatigue Weight loss Poor wound healing (cuts, scrapes, etc.) Dry mouth Dry or itchy skin Impotence (male) Recurrent infections such as vaginal yeast infections, groin rash, or external ear infections (swimmers ear) It is important to remember that not everyone with diabetes will have all these symptoms. In fact, many people with type 2 diabetes may not have any of them. Who can develop hyperglycemia? To learn about other diabetes complications and how to prevent them, see our type 1 diabetes complications and type 2 diabetes complications articles. The classic symptom of being hungry frequently stems from the fact that a person with diabetes cannot utilize glucose well as an energy source within cells. The glucose is circulating in the blood, but the cells can't absorb it to use it as a fuel. The excess blood sugar molecules also "spill" into the urine, meaning that as the blood filters through the kidneys, some of the sugar comes out of the blood and is not reabsorbed. The extra sugar which is no Continue reading >>

Postprandial Hyperglycemia: Signs, Symptoms And Treatment

Postprandial Hyperglycemia: Signs, Symptoms And Treatment

What is postprandial hyperglycemia? It is a condition where a person has extremely high blood glucose after eating a meal. Typically, blood glucose levels rise slightly after eating food. Glucose is a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy for the body. We get glucose from carbohydrate-rich foods, such as rice, bread, milk and potatoes. When we eat these foods, our body breaks it down into glucose that is then transported to various body tissues via the bloodstream. However, for glucose to enter the cells of the body to be used for energy, it requires insulin. Insulin is a natural hormone which is produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. This naturally occurring hormone is responsible for transporting glucose into body’s tissues such as fat and muscle cells. People who do not have diabetes are able to naturally produce insulin. On the other hand, people with type 2 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin after meals. Because of this, they may experience postprandial hyperglycemia (post-meal). You are considered to have postprandial hyperglycemia when your blood glucose levels go above 180 mg/dL. For non-diabetics, blood glucose levels rarely go beyond 140 mg/dL after eating. However, if you eat a large meal that contains a high amount of carbohydrates, your postprandial glucose levels can go up to 180 mg/DL. Post-prandial hyperglycemia is a challenge for people with diabetes who are aiming to achieve a stable blood sugar level. High blood glucose levels can lead to serious health complications including damage to nerves, kidneys and blood vessels. People with diabetes may take insulin injections to help them stabilize their blood glucose levels. Signs and Symptoms Various factors can contribute to symptoms of post-meal. People who are experiencing Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Definition Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar (glucose) level. Hyperglycemia is defined as too high a blood sugar (glucose) level. Description As you regulate your blood glucose and keep your diabetes record, there are two problems that you need to be able to recognize and treat (with your personal physician’s advice): hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia, or an insulin reaction, can happen if you are taking insulin or oral medications. Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose. This reaction happens when there is not enough glucose in your blood. A hypoglycemic reaction usually comes on very suddenly. It often happens at the time when insulin action is at its peak, during or after strenuous exercise or when a meal is delayed. Most people learn to recognize their own symptoms to an insulin reaction. If you begin feeling any symptoms or think your blood glucose may be too low, the best way to be sure is to check your blood level using a blood glucose test strip. If your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dl, then you are probably having a hypoglycemic reaction. Hyperglycemia: Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, is the condition found in individuals with diabetes, either insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent. Causes The most common causes of hypoglycemia are: 1. too much insulin, 2. too much exercise, or 3. not enough food Hyperglycemia usually occurs slowly, over several hours or days. It may be caused by: 1. not taking enough insulin 2. illness (such as a cold or flu) 3. infection 4. eating too much 5. stress 6. certain medications Symptoms Symptoms that you may notice with hypoglycemia are: sweating weakness anxiety trembling fast heartbeat inability to think straight irritability grouchiness hunger headache sleepiness Signs and sympto Continue reading >>

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: diabetes medicines (such as in Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Signs And Symptoms

Hyperglycemia Signs And Symptoms

Hyperglycemia Symptoms: Hyperglycemia or excessive blood sugar causes several signs and symptoms, significantly if the situation persists within the long-term (chronic hyperglycemia). Most cases of acute or short-term hyperglycemia do not present with symptoms. Some of the hyperglycemia symptoms associated with both acute and chronic hyperglycemia are explained below, with the first three forming the classic hyperglycemic triad. Polyphagia – Polyphagia represents elevated and extreme hunger. This is attributable to a low blood sugar stage, which can be introduced on by taking an excessive amount of anti-diabetes medicines. Missing a dose of insulin, following a meal and an excessive amount of physical activity are other elements which will trigger low blood sugar and set off elevated hunger. Polydipsia – This refers to extreme thirst and is often accompanied by a dry mouth. Polyuria – This pertains to the passage of an extreme and abnormally massive quantity of urine. Both polydipsia and polyuria happen when an excessive blood glucose stage means glucose goes into the urine taking water, salt, and minerals together with it. Other classic hyperglycemia symptoms include the following: Blurred vision Fatigue Weight loss Poor or delayed wound healing Recurrent infections, similar to thrush or swimmer’s ear. Dry or itchy skin Erectile dysfunction Cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rate) Stupor Seizures Coma Also, Must Watch This Video! Hyperglycemia Signs and Symptoms! Sources: Further Reading: What is the cause of Hyperglycemia? What is Hyperglycemia? What is Hypoglycemia? Blood sugar levels during Pregnancy. How to reduce Blood Glucose Levels. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia - Hyperglycemia

Low blood sugar – hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia means "low blood glucose." It is sometimes called a "hypo" and it can happen at any time during the day or night. You suffer from hypoglycemia when your body has insufficient sugar to use as energy, or when your blood glucose level is 70 mg/dL and below. Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar include: Sudden, extreme hunger Headache Blurred vision Trembling Weakness/tiredness Cold sweat Fast heartbeat Anxiety/nervousness Irritability What to do if you have low blood sugar: Check your blood sugar to confirm that your blood glucose is 70 mg/dL or below. Apply the 15/15 rule: Have 15 grams of a quick-acting carbohydrate, for example: a glass of fruit juice; three to four teaspoons (1 tablespoon) of sugar in water; or five-six hard candies. Or-- you can take glucose gel or glucose tablets (see label for 15g amount) Wait 15 minutes and check your blood sugar again. If your blood glucose level is still low, continue to: Alternate 15 grams of glucose with waiting 15 minutes to test your blood glucose until it reaches an acceptable target. Be sure to eat your next meal to prevent another low blood sugar reaction. If symptoms persist, call your doctor. High blood glucose – hyperglycemia High blood glucose can occur when your food, activity and medication are not balanced: too much food, not enough activity and not enough medicine. It can also happen when you are unwell or under stress. If you have high blood glucose levels, you may be more prone to infection. And an infection can cause your blood glucose level to rise even more. Signs of hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia or high blood glucose is a key indicator of diabetes and therefore, the symptoms are the same as the symptoms of diabetes. These include: Frequent urination Excessive thi Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatment

High Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatment

High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, occurs when the body has too much food or glucose, or too little insulin. Potential reasons a person with type 1 diabetes (T1D) might have high blood sugar include: Not enough insulin taken Eating more than usual Eating earlier than usual Eating food with higher glucose content without injecting extra insulin Injecting insulin at a site on the body where the absorption rate is slower Missing or skipping an insulin dose A clog in insulin pump tubing Less exercise than normal Emotional or physical stress Illness or injury Other hormones Medications (such as steroids) Pain Hyperglycemia Symptoms Thirst (dehydration) Frequent urination, including potential waking up in the middle of the night to urinate; and unusually wet diapers in an infant or toddler. Blurry vision Stomach pain Increased hunger Nausea Drowsiness, lethargy, exhaustion Confusion Sweating Fruity, sweet or wine-like odor on breath Vomiting Inability to concentrate Weight loss (a longer-term symptom) that eventually leads to coma Treatments The following recommendations are general treatments for high blood sugar. Specific actions, such as giving additional insulin, should be determined by the adult with T1D, physician or parents (for a child). If blood test results are slightly above normal: Continue regular activity Drink water or sugar-free drinks Monitor blood-sugar levels by checking regularly Chart blood-glucose test results Consider injecting additional insulin as instructed by physician or parent If blood test results are moderately high: Don’t engage in strenuous exercise Drink water or sugar-free drinks Inject additional insulin if instructed by physician or parents Monitor blood-sugar levels by checking regularly Chart blood-glucose test results Try to discover Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms Hypoglycemia & Hyperglycemia

Signs & Symptoms Hypoglycemia & Hyperglycemia

More than 23 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes, and each year 1.6 million people receive a new diagnosis of this disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with diabetes must carefully manage their blood sugar, or blood glucose, levels with diet, physical activity and medication to prevent diabetes complications and avoid hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Video of the Day When blood sugar levels drop below normal levels, a person may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia, such as nervousness, shakiness and hunger. He may sweat and feel dizzy, lightheaded and confused. Sleepiness, anxiety, confusion and difficulty talking are also signs that a person has hypoglycemia. A person who has hypoglycemia while sleeping may sweat profusely during sleep, experience nightmares or wake feeling tired and irritable. If hypoglycemia isn’t treated, the condition can worsen, causing more-severe symptoms such as fainting, confusion, clumsiness, seizures, coma and even death. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, most cases of hypoglycemia are mild, and consuming food or drink rich in carbohydrates helps bring blood sugar levels back to normal. People with diabetes may need to take glucose tablets to raise their blood sugar levels quickly and avoid hypoglycemia's complications. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar levels, occur when the body lacks insulin or cannot use insulin properly. High levels of sugar in the urine indicate hyperglycemia; frequently feeling thirsty and having to urinate often are also indicators of high blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, checking blood sugar levels often can help alert you to hyperglycemia before you feel symptoms. In many cases, reducing food intak Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia?

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can both occur in patients who have diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin (known as ‘Type 1 Diabetes’) or the cells in the body stop responding to insulin (known as ‘Type 2 Diabetes’). So what’s the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia? And how can a first aider spot the difference? Read on to find out how! Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia occurs when insulin is in excess of that needed to balance the patient’s food intake and energy expenditure. If untreated it will lead to unconsciousness and if prolonged, irreversible damage can occur. Signs and symptoms can be found for hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in the table below. Hypoglycemic patients may appear drunk although alcohol may also induce hypoglycemia. You should never discount the possibility that a patient who appears to be drunk may in fact be hypoglycemic. Most patients under the influence of alcohol will have their blood glucose levels recorded at hospital to ensure that they are not hypoglycemic. Hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia is often the presenting feature of diabetes. Patients who have not been diagnosed as diabetics will often go to their doctor complaining of excessive hunger, thirst and urination. On testing their blood glucose levels they are often found to be greater than 20 mmol/l (normal non-diabetics range is 3.0-5.6 mmol/l). Diabetic patients who are hyperglycemic have often been ill for some hours or days and have since deteriorated − most calls for assistance are made when the patient falls unconscious Want to learn more? Our advanced online first aid course contains information on diabetes and a range of other medical conditions. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia – Causes, Signs, Symptoms & Treatment

Hyperglycemia – Causes, Signs, Symptoms & Treatment

Hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) is the medical name for high levels of blood glucose – the characteristic of all forms of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Having too much sugar in your bloodstream can pose an immediate health risk, while regular periods of high blood glucose can lead to the development of health problems referred to as long term diabetes complications. What counts as hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia is defined by the American Diabetes Association as having a blood glucose level that is: Higher than 130 mg/dL (milligrams/deciliter) when fasting Equal or greater than 180 mg/dL (milligrams/deciliter) two hours after eating a meal ‘Normal’ blood glucose targets vary slightly depending on your type of diabetes and whether you’re a child or adult, and in some cases people may have different targets set for them by their health team. What are the signs of hyperglycemia? The main symptoms of high blood sugar levels are: Other common symptoms that can occur following prolonged periods of high blood glucose include: Regular urinary tract infections (UTIs) Thrush (yeast infections) Very high blood sugar levels can lead to more severe symptoms such as: Dehydration Nausea Vomiting Loss of consciousness Coma These more severe symptoms may indicate the presence of dangerous conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which affects people that are insulin dependent, and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (HHS), which can affect people with type 2 diabetes. If you or someone else with diabetes is experiencing these symptoms, call the emergency services for help. Causes of high blood sugar The underlying causes of hyperglycemia in people with diabetes are usually from the loss of insulin producing cells in the pancreas or insulin becoming less effective on Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Not to be confused with the opposite disorder, hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar (also spelled hyperglycaemia or hyperglycæmia) is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/l (200 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15–20 mmol/l (~250–300 mg/dl). A subject with a consistent range between ~5.6 and ~7 mmol/l (100–126 mg/dl) (American Diabetes Association guidelines) is considered slightly hyperglycemic, while above 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) is generally held to have diabetes. For diabetics, glucose levels that are considered to be too hyperglycemic can vary from person to person, mainly due to the person's renal threshold of glucose and overall glucose tolerance. On average however, chronic levels above 10–12 mmol/L (180–216 mg/dL) can produce noticeable organ damage over time. Signs and symptoms[edit] The degree of hyperglycemia can change over time depending on the metabolic cause, for example, impaired glucose tolerance or fasting glucose, and it can depend on treatment.[1] Temporary hyperglycemia is often benign and asymptomatic. Blood glucose levels can rise well above normal and cause pathological and functional changes for significant periods without producing any permanent effects or symptoms. [1] During this asymptomatic period, an abnormality in carbohydrate metabolism can occur which can be tested by measuring plasma glucose. [1] However, chronic hyperglycemia at above normal levels can produce a very wide variety of serious complications over a period of years, including kidney damage, neurological damage, cardiovascular damage, damage to the retina or damage to feet and legs. Diabetic n Continue reading >>

Signs Of Hyperglycemia In Dogs

Signs Of Hyperglycemia In Dogs

According to Pet Guardian Angels of America, hyperglycemia, or diabetes mellitus, is the most common canine hormonal disorder. The disease can be regulated, but it must be recognized first. Hyperglycemic dogs often display a number of symptoms; one must simply know what to watch for. Hyperglycemia can appear in two types: Type I (insulin dependent), occurring due to the body's inability to produce enough insulin or any insulin at all, and Type II (non-insulin dependent), occurring due to the body's inability to properly respond to insulin. Most dogs with diabetes have Type I. Some conditions place dogs in an at-risk category for hyperglycemia. These include breed (Cocker Spaniel, Beagle, Poodles, Keeshounds, Cairn Terrier, Dachshund, Schnauzer), female gender, obesity and age of five to seven years. Because a hyperglycemic dog has a high blood glucose level, her body attempts to expel some of the sugar by urinating frequently. "Diabetes mellitus" translates to "sweet urine" for this reason. A housebroken dog who begins to urinate in the house may have diabetes mellitus. Dogs with hyperglycemia often consume increased amounts of water as a result of their frequent urination. An excessively thirsty dog may indicate the presence of hyperglycemia. Diabetic dogs may suddenly develop cataracts, demonstrate an increase in appetite yet experience weight loss and appear dehydrated (check for a dry nose). General change in mood or behavior is also a potential indicator. If you suspect that your canine companion is hyperglycemic, consult a veterinarian. The vet will perform blood and urine tests and, if diabetes is diagnosed, will prescribe insulin injections and a special diet for your dog. Continue reading >>

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