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How To Treat Ketoacidosis In Dogs

's Experience With Ketoacidosis.

's Experience With Ketoacidosis.

Signs Treatment Zama's experience Diabetic ketoacidosis is caused by a lack of insulin or an insufficient amount of insulin. Since the lack of insulin means that glucose in not able to be used, the body searches for a new source of energy. In this condition, the diabetic breaks down body fat (lipolysis) to use as energy. During lipolysis, waste products called ketones are produced. Ketones are eliminated in the urine and through the lungs. Under normal conditions, the body can tolerate and eliminate ketones. But in diabetic ketoacidosis, fats are being broken down at such a high rate that the body can not eliminate the ketones fast enough and they build up in the blood. In high amounts, ketones are toxic to the body. They cause the acid-base balance to change and serious electrolyte and fluid imbalances result. Some of the signs of ketoacidosis include polyuria polydipsia lethargy anorexia weakness vomiting dehydration There will probably be ketones in the urine (ketonuria) The breath may have a sweet chemical smell similar to nail polish remover. However, some owners have said that even during documented ketoacidosis, their pet's breath did NOT have any unusual odor. Treatment Mildly ketoacidotic animals can be alert and well hydrated. After your pet is stabilized, your pet can return home and be treated with proper diabetes management techniques including insulin therapy, diet, and exercise. "Sick" ketoacidotic animals require intensive medical management in the vet hospital. This is a life-threatening emergency that requires complex medical management and monitoring. It may take several days for the animal to be out of danger. Treatment involves injections of regular insulin, intravenous fluids, electrolytes, and frequent monitoring of blood glucose, blood chemistry, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments

Diabetic ketoacidosis in canine, every now and then shortened to DKA, is a dangerous clinical emergency that occurs when there isn’t sufficient insulin within the frame to keep an eye on ranges of blood sugar referred to as glucose. It is a complication of diabetes mellitus that calls for rapid clinical remedy sooner than it turns into deadly. When insulin ranges drop, the frame can’t use glucose correctly, so glucose builds up within the blood whilst the liver produces ketone our bodies to behave as an emergency gas supply. When ketone our bodies are damaged down, they purpose the frame’s pH stability to shift and turn into extra acidic. Dogs can’t deal with their fluid and electrolyte stability, which ends up in fatal signs. If your canine presentations indicators of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly if they’ve been recognized with diabetes, it is vital that you just see an emergency veterinarian instantly for remedy. Here is what you will have to know in regards to the signs, reasons, and coverings for diabetic ketoacidosis in canine. Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs (Picture Credit: Getty Image) Sometimes canine that be afflicted by diabetic ketoacidosis best display gentle signs, however the majority of affected animals get very in poor health inside per week of the beginning of the sickness. The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis can resemble the caution indicators of a diabetic situation, which additionally calls for clinical consideration. The distinction is that diabetic ketoacidosis is the frame’s ultimate effort at survival sooner than succumbing to diabetes. Here are a number of signs of diabetic ketoacidosis in canine. Excessive thirst or urination Dehydration Sweet breath Sudden weight reduction Muscle loss Loss of urge for food Fatigue Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) In Dogs And Cats

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) In Dogs And Cats

What is DKA in Dogs and Cats? Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious and life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus that can occur in dogs and cats. DKA is characterized by hyperglycemia, ketonemia, +/- ketonuria, and metabolic acidosis. Ketone bodies are formed by lipolysis (breakdown) of fat and beta-oxidation when the metabolic demands of the cells are not met by the limited intracellular glucose concentrations. This provides alternative energy sources for cells, which are most important for the brain. The three ketones that are formed include beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone. Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate are anions of moderately strong acids contributing most to the academia (low blood pH). Acetone is the ketone body that can be detected on breath. In a normal animal, glucose enters the cell (with help of insulin) – undergoes glycolysis to pyruvate within cytosol – pyruvate moves into mitochondria (energy generating organelle in the cell) to enter the TCA cycle and ATP is formed. ATP is the main energy source of the body. When glucose cannot enter the cell, free fatty acids are broken down (lipolysis) and move into the cell to undergo beta-oxidation (creation of pyruvate). The pyruvate then moves into the mitochondria to enter the TCA cycle (by conversion to Acetyl-CoA first). However, when the TCA cycle is overwhelmed, the Acetyl-CoA is used in ketogenesis to form ketone bodies. Summary Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) in Dogs and Cats When there is no insulin the body cannot utilize glucose and there is no intracellular glucose. The body then uses ketone bodes as an alternate source. When there is decreased insulin and increased counterregulatory hormones fatty acids are converted to AcCoA and then ketones. In the non-diabetic Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) In Dogs

Overview Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) in Dogs Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), the most severe form of Diabetes Mellitus in dogs, results in severe changes in blood chemicals including imbalances in small, simple chemicals known as electrolytes. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic condition in which a deficiency of the hormone insulin impairs the body’s ability to metabolize sugar. It is one of the most common endocrine (hormonal) diseases of dogs. For more information on the basics of diabetes, go to Diabetes mellitus in dogs DKA is a life-threatening condition caused by diabetes mellitus resulting from insulin deficiency that leads to excess production of ketoacids by the liver. Subsequent changes in the blood result that includes metabolic acidosis, electrolyte abnormalities producing severe signs of systemic illness. DKA condition can occur in pets with new diabetes or in current diabetics that decompensate. Secondary diseases and/or infections can cause diabetics to decompensate and develop DKA. What to Watch For with Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Signs associated with DKA depend on the individual pet and the length of time they have been ill. Signs may consist of the classic signs of diabetes including: Increased thirst Increased frequency of urination Weight loss despite a good appetite Sudden blindness Additional signs of DKA include: Lethargy Vomiting Weakness Dehydration Some pets will have a strong smell of acetone from their breath Diagnosis of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) in Dogs Diagnostic tests for DKA in dogs may include: Complete medical history and thorough physical examination. Serum biochemical profile to determine the blood glucose concentration and to exclude other potential causes of the same symptoms such as pancreatitis. Elevated blood glucose is the Continue reading >>

How I Treat Electrolyte Disturbances In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

How I Treat Electrolyte Disturbances In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Proceeding of the NAVC North American Veterinary Conference Reprinted in the IVIS website with the permission of the NAVC Close window to return to IVIS Small Animal – Critical Care Nishi Dhupa, BVM, DACVIM, DACVECC College of Veterinary Medicine Cornell University, Ithaca, NY INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from an absolute or relative insulin deficiency in conjunction with glucagon and stress hormone excess. It is crucial to identify underlying disease factors contributing to stress in these patients. Stress factors include changes in environment, dehydration and concomitant disease. Commonly associated diseases include renal disease, urinary tract and other infection, and pancreatitis; in cats, hepatic lipidosis is also commonly seen. DKA is characterized by hyperglycemia, dehydration, ketonemia, metabolic acidosis and multiple electrolyte abnormalities. Treatment must be intensive and directed towards the correction of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities as well as the correction of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. The treatment itself (particularly the correction of acid-base imbalance with sodium bicarbonate therapy and the use of insulin therapy) may exacerbate the electrolyte abnormalities, and careful monitoring and aggressive treatment of these abnormalities is critical. Without treatment, DKA is fatal and it should be considered a medical emergency. The mortality rate for DKA is 25-30 %, even with aggressive treatment. CLINICAL SIGNS Clinical signs seen in dogs and cats with ketoacidosis include polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, weakness, dehydration, obtundation and hyper- or hypoventilation. These clinical signs may develop in various combinations and are usually severe in the keto Continue reading >>

Canine Ketoacidosis

Canine Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that occurs in diabetic dogs. The diabetes deprives the body of much needed glucose, the energy source used by cells. Without energy from glucose, the body will look for alternative sources such as the fat that is stored in the body. Your dog's body will start to break down the fats causing small deposits to accumulate in the blood. These deposits are called ketones. The condition is called canine Ketoacidosis. Since the sugar cannot enter the cells it builds up in the blood causing a condition called hyperglycemia. Ketocacidosis can be caused by untreated diabetes or ineffective treatment of canine diabetes such as insulin therapy that is not working. Stress,medications, not drinking enough water and a bacterial infection can also cause the insulin to not work as planned. The disease is seen most often in females (up to 80%) and dogs older than 7 years of age. Breeds with a higher predisposition to the disease are poodles (miniature and toy), miniature schnauzers, Cairn Terriers and Beagles. When you go to the veterinarian it is common for dogs to be comatose or in shock. Symptoms of Canine Ketoacidosis Symptoms associated with ketoacidosis in dogs are related to both canine diabetes and DKA. Excessive thirst (polydipsia) Frequent urination (polyuria) Weakness Lethargy/Tired Behavior No appetite (anorexia) Weight Loss Vomiting Abdominal Pain Depression Coma Diagnosis of Canine Ketoacidosis Your veterinarian will ask if your dog is on other drugs such as glucocorticoids or any other illnesses that your dog is suffering from. During a physical exam your veterinarian will look for signs of dehydration, pain, high temperature, jaundice, low pulse and neurological problems. They will also look for muscle decline, weight loss, catar Continue reading >>

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

A dog with a high level of ketones in his urine suffers from a condition known as ketonuria, usually resulting from a buildup of these substances in the dog's blood. A ketone is a type of acid, which, if allowed to accumulate in the blood, can lead to ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The main health conditions that can cause high ketone levels in a canine are starvation and diabetes. A dog's body breaks down the food that he eats into sugars, also called glucose, that the cells of the body use for energy. The dog's pancreas then produces the hormone insulin to regulate the amount of glucose that the body will absorb. If the insulin to regulate the glucose is insufficient, typically due to chronic diabetes mellitus, the body breaks down alternate sources of fuel for its cells; a dog's body that is starved of nutrition will do the same. One of these sources is the fat stored in the dog's body. When the body breaks down this fat, it produces as a by-product toxic acids known as a ketones. These ketones then build up in the dog's blood and also his urine, leading to ketoacidosis. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet. A dog suffering from high ketone levels in his blood and urine exhibits symptoms of weight loss, vomiting, increased thirst, decreased appetite, increased urination, lethargy, low body temperature and yellowing of the skin and gums, according to PetMD. The dog's breath may also have a sweet, fruity smell due to the presence of acetone caused by ketoacidosis, says VetInfo. To properly diagnose high ketone levels and ketoacidosis in your dog, a veterinarian will take blood tests and a urinalysis, which will also check your dog's blood glucose levels. Depending on the dog's physical condition, hospit Continue reading >>

Sugar High: Petplan Pet Insurance On Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pets

Sugar High: Petplan Pet Insurance On Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pets

We’ve discussed diabetes before--it’s a condition in cats and dogs caused by either a relative or absolute lack of insulin, which leads to high blood sugar. Blood sugar that is too high for too long results in a serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. We see diabetic ketoacidosis (or DKA, for short) in patients who are being under treated for diabetes and in patients whose diabetes was previously undiagnosed. These patients often come into the office on an emergency basis because of severe illness--they are vomiting, lethargic, dehydrated, and sometimes semi-comatose. High levels of glucose (or sugar) are found in both the blood and the urine due to insufficient insulin, and ketones are also present in the urine. In addition to high blood sugar levels, an insulin deficiency also affects the metabolism of fat, resulting in an increase in free fatty acids. These are converted to ketones. When insulin is low, ketones cannot be adequately utilized, so they build up in the body, causing ketosis. Ketosis causes acidosis (or acidifying of the blood), vomiting, dehydration, and sometimes neurological problems. In short, they make your diabetic pet feel pretty terrible. Not all animals with DKA show physical signs of illness. If ketones are present in your diabetic pet’s urine, then she also has ketoacidosis, even if she doesn’t appear to be sick. Non-sick ketoacidotic animals need to have their insulin doses re-evaluated to make sure the diabetes is adequately controlled. DKA can be life threatening, so treatment requires hospitalization. Fluid therapy is an important part of treatment to correct dehydration and addresses electrolyte imbalances. Short-acting insulin is administered frequently to decrease blood sugar levels quickly. Once blood glucose levels are Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Fatigue or weakness Weight loss Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident Slow, deep respiration. There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease. While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA: Fasting Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerba Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can’t be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the body’s cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: • Glucose: essential fuel for the body’s cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. • Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a “gatekeeper” that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. What is diabetes? With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isn’t working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: • Insulin-deficiency diabetes—This is when the dog’s body isn’t producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. • Insulin-resistance diabetes—This is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dog’s body isn’t utilizing the insulin as it should. The ce Continue reading >>

What Are The Treatments For Ketoacidosis In Dogs?

What Are The Treatments For Ketoacidosis In Dogs?

If your dog has diabetes mellitus, a common ailment in the canine realm, then diabetic ketoacidosis is a hazardous possibility. Ketoacidosis is a metabolic disorder that's related to extreme hyperglycemia. When diabetic dogs develop ketoacidosis, ketones, a type of acid, accumulate in their blood. Veterinary care is vital for dogs with this condition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Background When insufficient amounts of insulin bring upon the liver's inordinate manufacturing of ketoacids, ketoacidosis arises. Numerous factors can cause diabetic ketoacidosis in canines. The primary cause of the condition is reliance on insulin, although ketoacidosis is also linked to things such as urinary tract infections and skin infections. Dogs frequently experience diabetic ketoacidosis when their diabetes mellitus hasn't yet been identified or managed. Key Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms If you notice any unusual symptoms in your diabetic pet, get him to the veterinarian for treatment immediately. Diabetic ketoacidosis is an urgent condition. Common symptoms of the ailment are throwing up, nausea, appetite loss, dandruff, fatigue, feebleness, dehydration, fast breathing, depression, decreased body temperature, frequent urination, inordinate thirst, weight loss and unusual-smelling breath: If your dog's breath has an odor that's reminiscent of nail polish remover, diabetic ketoacidosis could be the culprit. Since diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency in dogs, immediate care is of the essence, no matter the time of day or night. If you notice these symptoms in your pet overnight, take him to a 24-hour veterinary hospital. Female dogs are particularly susceptible to the condition, as are elderly dogs. Treatment Options Some dogs with diabetic ketoacidosis need hospitalization, others do Continue reading >>

2010 Aaha Diabetes Management Guidelines For Dogs And Cats

2010 Aaha Diabetes Management Guidelines For Dogs And Cats

Renee Rucinsky, DVM, ABVP (Feline) (Chair) | Audrey Cook, BVM&:S, MRCVS, Diplomate ACVIM-SAIM, Diplomate ECVIM-CA | Steve Haley, DVM | Richard Nelson, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM | Debra L. Zoran, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM | Melanie Poundstone, DVM, ABVP - Download PDF - Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a treatable condition that requires a committed effort by veterinarian and client. This document provides current recommendations for the treatment of diabetes in dogs and cats. Treatment of DM is a combination of art and science, due in part to the many factors that affect the diabetic state and the animal's response. Each animal needs individualized, frequent reassessment, and treatment may be modified based on response. In both dogs and cats, DM is caused by loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells. In the dog, beta cell loss tends to be rapid and progressive, and it is usually due to immune-mediated destruction, vacuolar degeneration, or pancreatitis.1 Intact females may be transiently diabetic due to the insulin-resistant effects of the diestrus phase. In the cat, loss or dysfunction of beta cells is the result of insulin resistance, islet amyloidosis, or chronic lymphoplasmacytic pancreatitis.2 Risk factors for both dogs and cats include insulin resistance caused by obesity, other diseases (e.g., acromegaly in cats, hyperadrenocorticism in dogs), or medications (e.g., steroids, progestins). Genetics is a suspected risk factor, and certain breeds of dogs (Australian terriers, beagles, Samoyeds, keeshonden3) and cats (Burmese4) are more susceptible. Regardless of the underlying etiology, diabetic dogs and cats are hyperglycemic and glycosuric, which leads to the classic clinical signs of polyuria, polydipsia (PU/PD), polyphagia, and weight loss. Increased fat mobi Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs By Continuous Low-dose Intravenous Infusion Of Insulin.

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs By Continuous Low-dose Intravenous Infusion Of Insulin.

Abstract In a prospective clinical trial, low-dose, continuous, IV infusion of insulin (dosage, 2.2 U/kg of body weight, q 24 h) was used to treat 21 dogs with diabetic ketoacidosis. Mean (+/- SD) blood glucose concentration at the onset of treatment was 550 +/- 150 mg/dl and after 6 hours, was 350 +/- 106 mg/dl, with a mean decline of 34 +/- 16 mg/dl/h. By 12 hours, mean blood glucose was 246 +/- 85 mg/dl, with a mean decline of 28 +/- 14 mg/dl/h during the second 6 hours of treatment. Mean duration of treatment required to reach a blood glucose concentration < or = 250 mg/dl was 10 +/- 4 hours, with a range of 4 to 24 hours. Ketonuria was observed for 26 +/- 14 hours (range, 6 to 72 hours). Hypoglycemia developed in 3 of 21 dogs during treatment, but responded to IV administration of a glucose solution and to a reduction in rate of insulin delivery. Potassium supplementation was required in 15 of 21 dogs. Mean bicarbonate concentration was 11.6 +/- 3.4 mEq/L before treatment and was 18.2 +/- 0.7 mEq/L after 24 hours. Fifteen of 21 dogs (71%) survived to be discharged. Mean duration of treatment with the insulin infusion was 50 +/- 30 hours (range, 7 to 124 hours). In this series of dogs, continuous, low-dose, IV infusion of insulin provided a gradual and consistent reduction in blood glucose concentration while ketoacidosis, electrolyte balance, and dehydration were corrected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS). Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

Care Of Diabetic And Diabetic Ketoacidotic Patients (proceedings)

Care Of Diabetic And Diabetic Ketoacidotic Patients (proceedings)

Diabetes mellitus is the condition of hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and glucosuria (glucose in the urine) caused by absence of the hormone insulin, or failure of the cells of the body to be able to respond to insulin. Diabetes mellitus is the condition of hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and glucosuria (glucose in the urine) caused by absence of the hormone insulin, or failure of the cells of the body to be able to respond to insulin. Diabetes mellitus in veterinary patients can most often be compared to human adult onset diabetes (type 2), and juvenile onset diabetes is rare in veterinary patients. Patients may present with few clinical signs, in relatively good health (uncomplicated diabetes mellitus), or may be weak and dehydrated with severe electrolyte abnormalities (ketoacidotic diabetes mellitus). The most common clinical signs include weight loss, polyuria/polydipsia, increased or decreased appetite, unkempt hair coat, dandruff, sudden onset blindness (in dogs from cataract formation secondary to diabetes), and hind limb weakness (from diabetic neuropathy in cats) . In dogs and cats that have progressed to diabetic ketoacidosis, vomiting, anorexia, and lethargy are common complaints. Physical examination findings can reveal thin body condition, cataracts (dogs), dehydration, and mental dullness. Animals with recent onset diabetes mellitus can have a relatively normal examination. Laboratory testing to diagnose diabetes mellitus is relatively straightforward, and diagnosis can be confirmed at the time of evaluation in some cases with in-house testing. Elevated blood glucose is the mainstay of diagnosis; however keep in mind that hyperglycemia may be from diabetes, or secondary to a stress response, especially in cat. Handheld glucometers that are used by h Continue reading >>

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