diabetestalk.net

How To Treat Ketoacidosis In Cats

Share on facebook

What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Using Glargine For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Using glargine intravenously for diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis results from prolonged inadequate insulin activity. The main aims of therapy are to supply exogenous insulin, restore hydration status and manage electrolyte disturbances. Ketoacidotic cats usually present severely dehydrated and as such, have reduced absorption from subcutaneous tissue (from reduced blood flow). Until hydration is restored, insulin must be administered either intravenously or intramuscularly. For many years, the insulin of choice for treating ketoacidosis has been regular insulin due to its rapid onset, potent glucose lowering effect and predictably short duration of action. Glargine has almost identical properties to that of regular insulin when used intravenously (Scholtz et al, 2003). Its actions are so similar that glargine can simply be substituted for regular insulin (for all your current protocols just draw glargine up instead of regular insulin). There are no reported clinical trials in the human literature assessing glargine administered intravenously as it was accepted to have no benefit over regular insulin. Regular insulin is used solely to treat diabetic ketoacidosis and many Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Natalia & Enana

    Hi.
    I just put my cat in a veterinary emergency clinic with high ketoacidosis. They gave her an IV and insulin and other things I could afford. They told me to keep her there for 48 hours but I'm picking her up tomorrow and taking her to her vet. I dont know if my beautiful cat will survive. What are her chances? What are your suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Nat

  2. Sue and Oliver (GA)

    I am so sorry your kitty has DKA, Nat. It is possible to turn it around and she is in the best place to have that happen. We do have many cats who have survived and come home and lived long lives.
    What you can do - learn how to keep her safe at home. The best way to do that is to home test for blood glucose and for ketones. We test our cat's blood glucose levels just like we would our diabetic children. Here is a good site for beginning info: Newbie hometesting site and a video: Video for hometesting We have taught hundreds of people how to test over the internet. We would love to teach you. Testing for ketones will help you determine before DKA that he is heading into dangerous territory: ketones
    You can get the supplies for both these kinds of testing at any drug store. We use human glucometers and ketostix.
    Read about the best diet for your cat here: http://www.catinfo.org We feed wet lo carb food. BUT don't change the diet until you are hometesting. Oliver went down 100 points overnight when we switched from dry to wet. If we hadn't been hometesting, he would have overdosed.
    I am giving you a lot of info at once. The board is going down in 25 minutes and will be off for 2 hours for maintenance. Come back on later tonight or in the morning and post specifically for DKA. People who have dealt with it can give you lots of tips on how to care for your kitty when she gets home.

  3. Robert and Echo

    Nat, sending best wishes for your cat. Please keep us updated on her condition. Many cats do recover from DKA but, as you already know, it can be expensive treatment.
    _Rebecca

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

I love using essential oils for everything! I use them everyday and wanted to share with you 10 ways it's so helpful! There are so many uses from beauty, to cleaning, to deodorizing, and so much more. The scents are so uplifting and depending on which one you use, can calm you, or energize you. I also love to use these in hair masks because it has so many benefits...oils like peppermint and tea tree are so good for the scalp. Essential Oils Used :: Peppemint Oil, Lemongrass Oil, Tea Tree Oil, Lavender Oil, Sweet Orange Oil, Eucalyptus Oil Essential Oil Set from Pure Body Naturals :: www.purebodynaturals.com 10 Uses of Essential Oils :: 1. Add a few drops to your hair masks for a lovely scent! I like to use peppermint or tea tree oil. 2. Use it when cleaning or mopping for a clean fresh scent all around your house! 3. Diffuse in an oil warmer so your whole room or entire house will smell beautiful! 4. Use in a spray to freshen up rooms and bathrooms. Great DIY - Add a few drops in a spray bottle with some water..shake it up and spray where ever you want for a fresh scent! 5. Rub some essential oil on your inner wrists, behind the ears, on your neck, and inner elbows and every time y

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Cat: Recognition And Essential Treatment.

Abstract Practical relevance: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a not uncommon emergency in both newly diagnosed and poorly regulated diabetic cats. When there is a heightened metabolic rate and energy requirement due to concurrent illness, an increase in the release of glucose counter-regulatory hormones causes insulin receptor resistance, lipolysis, free fatty acid release and ketogenesis. This necessitates not only treatment to eliminate the ketosis and control blood glucose, but also investigation of concurrent illnesses. Clinical challenges: A number of metabolic derangements can occur with DKA, requiring a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, elimination of ketones, careful correction of glucose, electrolyte and acid base abnormalities, and close monitoring. AUDIENCE: Any veterinarian that cares for cats in urgent and emergency situations should understand the pathophysiology of DKA in order to address an individual's clinical signs and metabolic derangements. Evidence base: This review draws evidence from the peer-reviewed literature as well as the author's personal clinical experience. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Natalia & Enana

    Hi.
    I just put my cat in a veterinary emergency clinic with high ketoacidosis. They gave her an IV and insulin and other things I could afford. They told me to keep her there for 48 hours but I'm picking her up tomorrow and taking her to her vet. I dont know if my beautiful cat will survive. What are her chances? What are your suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Nat

  2. Sue and Oliver (GA)

    I am so sorry your kitty has DKA, Nat. It is possible to turn it around and she is in the best place to have that happen. We do have many cats who have survived and come home and lived long lives.
    What you can do - learn how to keep her safe at home. The best way to do that is to home test for blood glucose and for ketones. We test our cat's blood glucose levels just like we would our diabetic children. Here is a good site for beginning info: Newbie hometesting site and a video: Video for hometesting We have taught hundreds of people how to test over the internet. We would love to teach you. Testing for ketones will help you determine before DKA that he is heading into dangerous territory: ketones
    You can get the supplies for both these kinds of testing at any drug store. We use human glucometers and ketostix.
    Read about the best diet for your cat here: http://www.catinfo.org We feed wet lo carb food. BUT don't change the diet until you are hometesting. Oliver went down 100 points overnight when we switched from dry to wet. If we hadn't been hometesting, he would have overdosed.
    I am giving you a lot of info at once. The board is going down in 25 minutes and will be off for 2 hours for maintenance. Come back on later tonight or in the morning and post specifically for DKA. People who have dealt with it can give you lots of tips on how to care for your kitty when she gets home.

  3. Robert and Echo

    Nat, sending best wishes for your cat. Please keep us updated on her condition. Many cats do recover from DKA but, as you already know, it can be expensive treatment.
    _Rebecca

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Board Certified Feline Specialist Dr. Elizabeth Ruelle discusses her experience with diabetic remission in feline patients. "Having a diabetic cat does not have to change your relationship with your cat" - a project by Cat Healthy in collaboration with Boehringer Ingelheim. Watch the full video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ppf94... Watch other videos from this project: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Remission Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has long been considered a key clinical feature of type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM) in humans although. An increasing number of cases of ketoacidosis have been reported in people with type-2 DM. Hypothesis/Objectives: Cats initially diagnosed with DKA can achieve remission from diabetes. Cats with DKA and diabetic remission are more likely to have been administered glucocorticoids before diagnosis. Animals: Twelve cats with DKA and 7 cats with uncomplicated DM. Methods: Retrospective case review. Medical records of cats presenting with DKA or DM were evaluated. Diabetic remission was defined as being clinically unremarkable for at least 1 month after insulin withdrawal. The cats were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) cats with DKA and diabetic remission; (2) cats with DKA without diabetic remission; and (3) cats with DM and diabetic remission. Results: Seven cats with DKA had remission from diabetes. These cats had significantly higher concentrations of leukocytes and segmented neutrophils, and significantly lower concentrations of eosinophils in blood and had pancreatic disease more often than did cats with uncomplicated DM and diabetic r Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Natalia & Enana

    Hi.
    I just put my cat in a veterinary emergency clinic with high ketoacidosis. They gave her an IV and insulin and other things I could afford. They told me to keep her there for 48 hours but I'm picking her up tomorrow and taking her to her vet. I dont know if my beautiful cat will survive. What are her chances? What are your suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Nat

  2. Sue and Oliver (GA)

    I am so sorry your kitty has DKA, Nat. It is possible to turn it around and she is in the best place to have that happen. We do have many cats who have survived and come home and lived long lives.
    What you can do - learn how to keep her safe at home. The best way to do that is to home test for blood glucose and for ketones. We test our cat's blood glucose levels just like we would our diabetic children. Here is a good site for beginning info: Newbie hometesting site and a video: Video for hometesting We have taught hundreds of people how to test over the internet. We would love to teach you. Testing for ketones will help you determine before DKA that he is heading into dangerous territory: ketones
    You can get the supplies for both these kinds of testing at any drug store. We use human glucometers and ketostix.
    Read about the best diet for your cat here: http://www.catinfo.org We feed wet lo carb food. BUT don't change the diet until you are hometesting. Oliver went down 100 points overnight when we switched from dry to wet. If we hadn't been hometesting, he would have overdosed.
    I am giving you a lot of info at once. The board is going down in 25 minutes and will be off for 2 hours for maintenance. Come back on later tonight or in the morning and post specifically for DKA. People who have dealt with it can give you lots of tips on how to care for your kitty when she gets home.

  3. Robert and Echo

    Nat, sending best wishes for your cat. Please keep us updated on her condition. Many cats do recover from DKA but, as you already know, it can be expensive treatment.
    _Rebecca

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • How To Treat Ketoacidosis In Cats

    Michelle Gerhard Jasny, V.M.D. has been practicing veterinary medicine on the Vineyard since 1982 and writing the Visiting Vet column for more than 25 years. She lives and works in West Tisbury. She can be reached at [email protected] Yves had always been a cat who liked to eat. A seasonal resident, I saw him every summer. When he was four years old, I suggested reducing the amount he was being fed. At six, I advised a prescription weight loss ...

    ketosis Jan 5, 2018
  • How To Treat Ketoacidosis In Dogs At Home

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an emergency. DKA develops due to: Long standing undiagnosed canine diabetes Insufficient insulin dose in treated diabetic dogs Reduced insulin action - caused by obesity, concurrent illness or drugs. This is the cause of more than two-thirds of cases of DKA. What causes diabetic ketoacidosis? Due to a lack of insulin, glucose cannot be used by the body cells as an energy source. Instead fat is broken down to provid ...

    ketosis Dec 30, 2017
  • How To Treat Ketoacidosis At Home

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is an extreme medical emergency that requires immediate veterinary attention. The condition can result in an accumulation of fluid in the brain and lungs, renal failure or heart failure. Affected animals that are not treated are likely to die. With timely intervention and proper treatment, it is likely that an affected cat can recover with little to no side effects. Diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas fails to produce ...

    ketosis Jan 3, 2018
  • How To Treat Ketoacidosis In Dogs

    A dog with a high level of ketones in his urine suffers from a condition known as ketonuria, usually resulting from a buildup of these substances in the dog's blood. A ketone is a type of acid, which, if allowed to accumulate in the blood, can lead to ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The main health conditions that can cause high ketone levels in a canine are starvation and diabetes. A dog's body breaks down the food that he eats into ...

    ketosis Dec 30, 2017
  • Ketoacidosis How To Treat

    1. IV Isotonic Crystalloid Therapy • Shock fluid therapy is warranted if cardiovascular instability is present: Full shock dose of fluids is 90 mL/kg; start with ¼ to 1/3 dose and reassess until stable • Correct dehydration, provide maintenance needs, and replace ongoing losses over 6 to 24 hours: - % dehydration × body weight (kg) × 1000 plus - 20 mL/kg/day (insensible losses) plus - 20 to 40 mL/kg/day (maintenance sensibl ...

    ketosis Jan 2, 2018
  • How To Treat Ketoacidosis

    Immediately drink a large amount of non-caloric or low caloric fluid. Continue to drink 8 to 12 oz. every 30 minutes. Diluted Gatorade, water with Nu-Salt™ and similar fluids are good because they help restore potassium lost because of high blood sugars. Take larger-than-normal correction boluses every 3 hours until the blood sugar is below 200 mg/dl (11 mmol) and ketones are negative. It will take much more rapid insulin than normal to bring b ...

    ketosis Jan 2, 2018

Popular Articles

More in ketosis