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How To Treat Ketoacidosis In Cats

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Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakd Continue reading >>

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  1. Natalia & Enana

    Hi.
    I just put my cat in a veterinary emergency clinic with high ketoacidosis. They gave her an IV and insulin and other things I could afford. They told me to keep her there for 48 hours but I'm picking her up tomorrow and taking her to her vet. I dont know if my beautiful cat will survive. What are her chances? What are your suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Nat

  2. Sue and Oliver (GA)

    I am so sorry your kitty has DKA, Nat. It is possible to turn it around and she is in the best place to have that happen. We do have many cats who have survived and come home and lived long lives.
    What you can do - learn how to keep her safe at home. The best way to do that is to home test for blood glucose and for ketones. We test our cat's blood glucose levels just like we would our diabetic children. Here is a good site for beginning info: Newbie hometesting site and a video: Video for hometesting We have taught hundreds of people how to test over the internet. We would love to teach you. Testing for ketones will help you determine before DKA that he is heading into dangerous territory: ketones
    You can get the supplies for both these kinds of testing at any drug store. We use human glucometers and ketostix.
    Read about the best diet for your cat here: http://www.catinfo.org We feed wet lo carb food. BUT don't change the diet until you are hometesting. Oliver went down 100 points overnight when we switched from dry to wet. If we hadn't been hometesting, he would have overdosed.
    I am giving you a lot of info at once. The board is going down in 25 minutes and will be off for 2 hours for maintenance. Come back on later tonight or in the morning and post specifically for DKA. People who have dealt with it can give you lots of tips on how to care for your kitty when she gets home.

  3. Robert and Echo

    Nat, sending best wishes for your cat. Please keep us updated on her condition. Many cats do recover from DKA but, as you already know, it can be expensive treatment.
    _Rebecca

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