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How To Reduce Ketoacidosis

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

A dog with a high level of ketones in his urine suffers from a condition known as ketonuria, usually resulting from a buildup of these substances in the dog's blood. A ketone is a type of acid, which, if allowed to accumulate in the blood, can lead to ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The main health conditions that can cause high ketone levels in a canine are starvation and diabetes. A dog's body breaks down the food that he eats into sugars, also called glucose, that the cells of the body use for energy. The dog's pancreas then produces the hormone insulin to regulate the amount of glucose that the body will absorb. If the insulin to regulate the glucose is insufficient, typically due to chronic diabetes mellitus, the body breaks down alternate sources of fuel for its cells; a dog's body that is starved of nutrition will do the same. One of these sources is the fat stored in the dog's body. When the body breaks down this fat, it produces as a by-product toxic acids known as a ketones. These ketones then build up in the dog's blood and also his urine, leading to ketoacidosis. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet. A dog suffering from high ketone levels in his blood and urine exhibits symptoms of weight loss, vomiting, increased thirst, decreased appetite, increased urination, lethargy, low body temperature and yellowing of the skin and gums, according to PetMD. The dog's breath may also have a sweet, fruity smell due to the presence of acetone caused by ketoacidosis, says VetInfo. To properly diagnose high ketone levels and ketoacidosis in your dog, a veterinarian will take blood tests and a urinalysis, which will also check your dog's blood glucose levels. Depending on the dog's physical condition, hospit Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference paper. Here's a table of the actual numbers to show the differences in magnitude: Body Condition Quantity of Ketones Being Produced After a meal: 0.1 mmol/L Overnight Fast: 0.3 mmol/L Ketogenic Diet (Nutritional ketosis): 1-8 mmol/L >20 Days Fasting: 10 mmol/L Uncontrolled Diabetes (Ketoacidosis): >20 mmol/L Here's a more detailed explanation: Fact 1: Every human body maintains the blood and cellular fluids within a very narrow range between being too acidic (low pH) and too basic (high pH). If the blood pH gets out of the normal range, either too low or too high, big problems happen. Fact 2: The Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is And How To Prevent It

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is And How To Prevent It

What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (say: key-toe-acid-OH-sis), or DKA for short, happens when your body has high blood sugar (also called glucose) and a build-up of acid. If it isn’t treated, it can lead to coma and even death. It mainly affects persons with type 1 diabetes. But, it can happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and diabetes during pregnancy. What causes DKA? The main cause of DKA is not having enough insulin. This raises the blood glucose levels, but stops the body from using the glucose for energy. To get calories, the body starts to burn fat. This causes a build-up of acid in the body. A high level of blood glucose can cause excessive urination, which leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). What are triggering factors? The most common triggering factors are “skipping” insulin doses and illnesses, especially infections that raise your body’s need for insulin. How can I prevent DKA? You should work with your doctor to have a plan if your blood glucose level gets too high. Make sure that you know how to reach your doctor in an emergency. Careful monitoring is needed, especially if you are sick. What should I do? Check your blood glucose level at least every three to four hours if you are sick. Check your glucose level every one to two hours if you have critical blood glucose values. Ask your doctor what your critical level should be. Most patients should watch their glucose levels closely when they are higher than 250 mg per dL. Keep testing at least every four hours during the night. Test your urine for ketones or your blood for beta-hydroxybutyrate every four hours or if your blood glucose is over 250 mg per dL. If you are not eating, do NOT stop your insulin completely. Your body needs insuli Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

With What Diet Can I Lose A Lot Of Weight Fast?

With What Diet Can I Lose A Lot Of Weight Fast?

Look, almost any diet will make you lose weight. But what are you going to do when you’re finished with them? If you’re like most people, you’ll fall back on your old habits—the same ones that made you fat in the first place. That’s why most diets end in failure. It’s not that they’re ineffective—although some are complete rubbish; it’s that they’re a temporary answer to a semi-permanent problem. Here’s what you need to find out: what’s the healthiest form of food consumption you can enjoy for the rest of your life? Maybe you like veganism? Or paleo, or keto, or whatever. Perhaps you don’t end up in any diet camp and instead create your own habits. That’s great too. But here’s what matters for right now: if you want to lose weight, then you must consume food at a caloric deficit. This means eating less calories than you burn. I lost eighty pounds a number of years ago. About fifty to sixty pounds of that came without any exercise; I simply ate at a caloric deficit and tracked everything on MyFitnessPal—an online food journal with a mobile app. Similar stories can be found daily on forums like Reddit’s /r/loseit. You can literally achieve this eating junk food. (although I don’t recommend it!) A professor at Kansas State University lost 27lbs in 2 months eating Twinkies, chips, Oreos, and other junk. More recently, I lost 6lbs after eating exclusively at gas stations for 30 days. I traveled across 9 states and visited more than 200 stores—all in an effort to prove that you can “eat out” and still be healthy. But to be fair, the convenience store industry is working hard to make healthful food available on-the-go. Finding fruit, veggies, and good made-to-order options was easier than I thought it would be. So here’s the point: d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Facts Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that may occur in people who have diabetes, most often in those who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. It involves the buildup of toxic substances called ketones that make the blood too acidic. High ketone levels can be readily managed, but if they aren't detected and treated in time, a person can eventually slip into a fatal coma. DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. Although much less common, DKA can occasionally occur in people with type 2 diabetes under extreme physiologic stress. Causes With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body's cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can't get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn't available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body's metabolic processes aren't able Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Weight By 10 Kgs In 6 Months?

How Can I Reduce My Weight By 10 Kgs In 6 Months?

Weight Loss is one of the most searched topic on internet. Obesity is the root cause of majority of lifestyle related diseases & other serious medical conditions. 6 months back, i hit a century (106*) not in cricket but in body weight. It was an alarm bell as i started facing other Health Issues due to obesity. I was a big time foodie contributing to the high profits of Soft Drink, Pizza, Burger & FMCG companies. In my opinion if you eat food like a Medicine at young age than you need not to eat Medicines like Food at old age (Food for thought). At the same time, I strongly recommend not to consult Dietitians. No offence to profession but i consulted 3 dietitians. My observation is that they have nothing different to add & you will get standard advice everywhere. The mere thought of Weight loss 6 months ago was like climbing Mount Everest or clearing IAS exam for me. Let me admit, I took the challenge of Weight Loss not willingly but considering my aggravating health issues. After thorough search on various diet plans & consulting few doctors, i set a target of 25 Kg Weight Loss in 6 months for myself i.e. to reach 81 kg. Body Mass Index (BMI) Calculator is best way to calculate ideal weight. I did lot of research on weight loss and studied the diet composition very thoroughly before adopting the same. In my opinion, western countries are more scientific & practical in approach. I read various case studies where people lost weight without compromising on fat in the diet though it is biggest culprit. For the benefit of readers, I will divide this post on Weight Loss into 4 parts (a) Do’s and Don’ts of Weight Loss (b) Weight Loss Diet (c) Daily Routine & (d) Weight Loss Exercise Do’s & Don’ts of Weight Loss 1. WILL Power of an individual play very critical role, i Continue reading >>

Recurrent Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Inner-city Minority Patients

Recurrent Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Inner-city Minority Patients

OBJECTIVE To conduct a bedside study to determine the factors driving insulin noncompliance in inner-city patients with recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed socioeconomic and psychological factors in 164 adult patients with DKA who were admitted to Grady Hospital between July 2007 and August 2010, including demographics, diabetes treatment, education, and mental illness. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Short Form-36 surveys were used to screen for depression and assess quality of life. RESULTS The average number of admissions was 4.5 ± 7 per patient. A total of 73 patients presented with first-time DKA, and 91 presented with recurrent DKA; 96% of patients were African American. Insulin discontinuation was the leading precipitating cause in 68% of patients; other causes were new-onset diabetes (10%), infection (15%), medical illness (4%), and undetermined causes (3%). Among those who stopped insulin, 32% gave no reasons for stopping, 27% reported lack of money to buy insulin, 19% felt sick, 15% were away from their supply, and 5% were stretching insulin. Compared with first-time DKA, those with recurrent episodes had longer duration of diabetes (P < 0.001), were a younger age at the onset of diabetes (P = 0.04), and had higher rates of depression (P = 0.04), alcohol (P = 0.047) and drug (P < 0.001) abuse, and homelessness (P = 0.005). There were no differences in quality-of-life scores, major psychiatric illnesses, or employment between groups. CONCLUSIONS Poor adherence to insulin therapy is the leading cause of recurrent DKA in inner-city patients. Several behavioral, socioeconomic, psychosocial, and educational factors contribute to poor compliance. The recognition of such factors and the institution of culturally Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes complications can be divided into two types: acute (sudden) and chronic (long-term). This article discusses these complications and strategies to prevent the complications from occurring in the first place. Acute complications Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome (HHNS) Acute complications of diabetes can occur at any time in the course of the disease. Chronic complications Cardiovascular: Heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke Eye: Diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma Nerve damage: Neuropathy Kidney damage: Nephropathy Chronic complications are responsible for most illness and death associated with diabetes. Chronic complications usually appear after several years of elevated blood sugars (hyperglycemia). Since patients with Type 2 diabetes may have elevated blood sugars for several years before being diagnosed, these patients may have signs of complications at the time of diagnosis. Basic principles of prevention of diabetes complications: Take your medications (pills and/or insulin) as prescribed by your doctor. Monitor your blood sugars closely. Follow a sensible diet. Do not skip meals. Exercise regularly. See your doctor regularly to monitor for complications. Results from untreated hyperglycemia. Blood sugars typically range from 300 to 600. Occurs mostly in patients with Type 1 diabetes (uncommon in Type 2). Occurs due to a lack of insulin. Body breaks down its own fat for energy, and ketones appear in the urine and blood. Develops over several hours. Can cause coma and even death. Typically requires hospitalization. Nausea, vomiting Abdominal pain Drowsiness, lethargy (fatigue) Deep, rapid breathing Increased thirst Fruity-smelling breath Dehydration Inadequate insulin administration (not getting Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Levels Above 400

Blood Glucose Levels Above 400

In order to reduce the risk of long-term health problems, a goal of therapy in diabetes is to achieve near-normal blood glucose, or blood sugar levels. But even in the short-term, it’s important to prevent high blood sugars, since significant elevations may be associated with an array of symptoms including dehydration, increased risk of infections, and the life-threatening conditions diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). Since DKA and HHS are serious conditions that can lead to coma and death, blood sugar levels above 400 mg/dL should be considered a medical emergency. Video of the Day Diabetes mellitus is a condition that leads to high blood sugar levels. In diabetes, blood sugars tend to run well above the normal range -- which depending on the laboratory is somewhere between 70 to 100 mg/dL. If you have type 1 diabetes (T1DM), elevated blood sugars are caused by an absence of insulin, the hormone that is necessary to remove excess glucose from the blood. In type 2 diabetes (T2DM), blood sugars levels run high due to impaired insulin production or action. Factors that worsen blood sugars include illness, certain medications, inactivity, or diet -- such as eating large portions or excessive carbohydrates. Blood sugars can also increase if diabetes medications are not taken regularly. Measuring your blood sugar is an important way to manage diabetes, as glucose meter results can alert you to a problem well before symptoms occur. Classic symptoms of high blood sugars include thirst, frequent urination, dry skin, fatigue, drowsiness, blurred vision and sometimes unintentional weight loss. Infections -- such as skin or urinary tract infections -- are also more likely to occur when blood sugars are elevated. Symptoms may not be noticed unt Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetes mellitus is the name given to a group of conditions whose common hallmark is a raised blood glucose concentration (hyperglycemia) due to an absolute or relative deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin. In the UK there are 1.4 million registered diabetic patients, approximately 3 % of the population. In addition, an estimated 1 million remain undiagnosed. It is a growing health problem: In 1998, the World Health Organization (WHO) predicted a doubling of the worldwide prevalence of diabetes from 150 million to 300 million by 2025. For a very tiny minority, diabetes is a secondary feature of primary endocrine disease such as acromegaly (growth hormone excess) or Cushing’s syndrome (excess corticosteroid), and for these patients successful treatment of the primary disease cures diabetes. Most diabetic patients, however, are classified as suffering either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for around 15 % of the total diabetic population, is an autoimmune disease of the pancreas in which the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas are selectively destroyed, resulting in an absolute insulin deficiency. The condition arises in genetically susceptible individuals exposed to undefined environmental insult(s) (possibly viral infection) early in life. It usually becomes clinically evident and therefore diagnosed during late childhood, with peak incidence between 11 and 13 years of age, although the autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction begins many years earlier. There is currently no cure and type 1 diabetics have an absolute life-long requirement for daily insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes: around 85 % of the diabetic population has type 2 diabetes. The primary prob Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Treatment & Management

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Managing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in an intensive care unit during the first 24-48 hours always is advisable. When treating patients with DKA, the following points must be considered and closely monitored: It is essential to maintain extreme vigilance for any concomitant process, such as infection, cerebrovascular accident, myocardial infarction, sepsis, or deep venous thrombosis. It is important to pay close attention to the correction of fluid and electrolyte loss during the first hour of treatment. This always should be followed by gradual correction of hyperglycemia and acidosis. Correction of fluid loss makes the clinical picture clearer and may be sufficient to correct acidosis. The presence of even mild signs of dehydration indicates that at least 3 L of fluid has already been lost. Patients usually are not discharged from the hospital unless they have been able to switch back to their daily insulin regimen without a recurrence of ketosis. When the condition is stable, pH exceeds 7.3, and bicarbonate is greater than 18 mEq/L, the patient is allowed to eat a meal preceded by a subcutaneous (SC) dose of regular insulin. Insulin infusion can be discontinued 30 minutes later. If the patient is still nauseated and cannot eat, dextrose infusion should be continued and regular or ultra–short-acting insulin should be administered SC every 4 hours, according to blood glucose level, while trying to maintain blood glucose values at 100-180 mg/dL. The 2011 JBDS guideline recommends the intravenous infusion of insulin at a weight-based fixed rate until ketosis has subsided. Should blood glucose fall below 14 mmol/L (250 mg/dL), 10% glucose should be added to allow for the continuation of fixed-rate insulin infusion. [19, 20] In established patient Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency related to diabetes. It’s also the most likely time for a child with diabetes to die.” DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose; the person is dehydrated; and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. The initial insulin deficit is most often caused by the onset of diabetes, by an illness or infection, or by not taking insulin when it is needed. Ketones are your brain’s “second-best fuel,” Hellman says, with glucose being number one. If you don’t have enough glucose in your cells to supply energy to your brain, yo Continue reading >>

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