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How To Pronounce Hypoglycemia

Decoding Doctor Speak

Decoding Doctor Speak

September 30, 2013 For people who are not trained in medicine, medical terminology can be intimidating and hard to understand. Many patients feel confused by the variety of scientific words, abbreviations, and acronyms. It all may sound like Greek – because much of it is! Most medical words are derived from either Greek or Latin. Terms related to surgery and diagnoses usually have Greek origins, while words referring to the structure of the body are often Latin-based. However, there is no need to feel overwhelmed. The key to understanding medical language is to develop knowledge of some often-used roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Some medical terms have a prefix but no suffix, or vice versa, but there is almost always at least one root. An example is anemia, a condition of not having enough healthy blood cells, which can be caused by a loss of blood. The prefix is a, meaning lacking. Emia is a root that refers to blood. There is no suffix in this word. Some medical terms have an extra component called a combining form or combining vowel. The combining vowel has no meaning. Its only purpose is to make the word easier to pronounce. Arthropathy is a disease of the joints. Arthr is a root word meaning joint, and pathy (or path) is a suffix that means disease. The o is a connecting vowel that makes the word easier to say. Building a Word in Three Parts The prefix and suffix each add meaning and specificity to the root. For example, the word hypoglycemia has three parts: hypo-gly-cemia. The root is glyc, which refers to sugar (glucose). The prefix is hypo, which means low or deficient. Finally, the suffix, emia, refers to blood. Hypoglycemia is a condition of having of low blood sugar. By learning the structure of medical language, it becomes easier to determine the meaning o Continue reading >>

December 2011 – Positive Attitude: It Won’t Work Without It!

December 2011 – Positive Attitude: It Won’t Work Without It!

What a year! Looking back on 2011, I can’t believe all that I’ve accomplished. A new website, new book, Constant Contact, Facebook and the first ever HSF fundraising gala! I was glued to my computer some 14 to 16 hours a day and really experienced the truth of what Ernest Hemingway once said… “There is nothing new to writing. All you have to do is sit at the typewriter and bleed.” But with all the hard work, deadlines, challenges and “mistakes” came a feeling of great accomplishment, not just on a professional level but even more so on a personal one. I was pushed way out of my comfort zone and not only lived to tell the story but also succeeded beyond my wildest dreams. There was only one way I could have done it all…with the support of my incredible family, friends, business associates and even strangers. Their guidance and selfless contributions – interwoven with determination, enthusiasm, love, positive thoughts and energy – sustained me, gave me hope and allowed me to persevere. I am so blessed to have had them with me on this incredible journey. So as one year ends and another begins…I share with you, my readers, one of the chapters of my book that is so apropos right now. POSITIVE ATTITUDE: IT WON’T WORK WITHOUT IT (Excerpted from The Do’s and Don’ts of Hypoglycemia: An Everyday Guide to Low Blood Sugar) When I first began dreaming about forming the HSF, I was constantly plagued by my own insecurity. I wasn’t a doctor, a nurse, or even a college graduate. What made me presume that I could start an organization to help sick people? I didn’t have an answer to that question. Yet, there I was trying to form an advocacy group for a disease whose existence medical doctors didn’t recognize and whose name most people couldn’t pronounce Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Writers' Dictionary

Hypoglycemia - Writers' Dictionary

How to hyphenate hypoglycemia hypoglycemia is hyphenated as hy-po-gly-ce-mi-a How to pronounce hypoglycemia hypoglycemia is pronounced ´häɪp ōʊɡläɪ´s ēːmēːə Number of syllables in hypoglycemia The number of syllables in hypoglycemia is 6 What part of speech in hypoglycemia? hypoglycemia is a noun How common in the word hypoglycemia? hypoglycemia is not ranked in the list of most common words in English What sentiment does hypoglycemia convey? not ranked Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

How Do You Pronounce The Word Hypoglycemia?

How Do You Pronounce The Word Hypoglycemia?

Want to know how to pronounce the word hypoglycemia? We'll say it. Just listen. We'll say the word 'hypoglycemia' for you. Just click the button below to listen. say it \ˌhī-pō-glī-ˈsē-mē-ə\ Your browser does not support audio. See Also What is the opposite of hypoglycemia? Sentences with the word hypoglycemia What is the meaning of the word hypoglycemia? Words that rhyme with hypoglycemia What is the plural of hypoglycemia? What is the singular of hypoglycemia? What is the adjective for hypoglycemia? What is the noun for hypoglycemia? (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_GB/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.10&appId=784463018288034"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk')); Like Us on Facebook Wordhippo More Words How do you pronounce the word hypodermic? How do you pronounce the word hypodermically? How do you pronounce the word hypodermics? How do you pronounce the word hypogeal? How do you pronounce the word hypogean? How do you pronounce the word hypogeous? How do you pronounce the word hypogeum? How do you pronounce the word hypoglycemic? How do you pronounce the word hypoid? How do you pronounce the word hypokalemia? How do you pronounce the word hypokalemic? How do you pronounce the word hypolimnion? How do you pronounce the word hypomania? How do you pronounce the word hypomanic? Translations for Other Languages What is the Danish word for hypoglycemia? What is the French word for hypoglycemia? What is the Italian word for hypoglycemia? Related Words What is the opposite of hypoglycemia? Sentences with the word hypoglycemia What is the meaning of the word hypoglycemia? How do you pronounce Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medicine: Sulfonylureas

Diabetes Medicine: Sulfonylureas

If you have Type 1 diabetes, your pancreas no longer makes enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose move from the bloodstream into your cells where the glucose is used for energy. Everyone who has Type 1 diabetes must take insulin, whether by injection, inhalation (for rapid-acting insulin), or insulin pump, to survive. There is no “insulin pill,” at least at this time. With Type 2 diabetes, the situation is a bit different. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, the body makes plenty of insulin, but has a hard time using it. This is called insulin resistance. Certain medicines, such as metformin, can help improve insulin resistance so that the body can use insulin better. But as Type 2 diabetes progresses, the pancreas can get tired and stop making enough insulin to keep up with the demand. If and when this happens, insulin injections are usually needed. This week, we’ll look at another class of diabetes pills called sulfonylureas. What are sulfonylureas? One of the trickiest drug names to pronounce, sulfonylureas (SUL-fah-nil-YOO-ree-ahs) are the oldest type of diabetes pills available. They were developed in the 1940’s and were the first type of diabetes pill to enter the market. These pills, which are sometimes called “oral hypoglycemic agents,” work very differently than metformin. They signal the pancreas to release insulin and they also help the body’s cells use insulin better. Sulfonylureas may be old, but they’re effective: They can lower A1C levels (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) by 1% to 2%. There are two generations of sulfonylureas: first and second. The first-generation drugs include tolbutamide (brand name Orinase), tolazamide (Tolinase), and chlorpropamide (Diabinese). The second-generatio Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is a condition I was diagnosed with back in Baltimore several years ago when I was dealing with Conn's. The doctor who told me I had it didn't fill me in on all of the symptoms, he just kind of lumped them all in with Conn's and told me to always eat regularly if I felt weak or like I was going to pass out. He never went over all the other triggers, which could have saved me from some dangerous situations. Once again, this is where you have to do your own research. I wish I had, but was so consumed with the problems I was suffering with Conn's, that I couldn't tell what symptom was causing what. Most doctors I saw thought Conn's was the culprit that was robbing me of stamina and doing strange things to my head. Things got so tricky with feeling horrible that I never looked into the fact that hypoglycemia could have compounded the symptoms of Conn's. Conned again, it seems. The definition of Hypoglycemia is insulin shock or Low blood sugar. Insulin is a hormone that reduces blood sugar. It is produced by the pancreas in response to increased glucose levels in the blood. Blood sugar below 70 mg/dL is considered low. Blood sugar at or below this level can harm you. And I am lucky to be alive after having some really scary episodes of this. The most common causes of low blood sugar in people without diabetes are: Insulinoma - a tumor in the pancreas, produces too much insulin Skipping meals Waiting to eat your meals, or eating at off times Exercising more or at a different time than usual Drinking alcohol Symptoms you may have when your blood sugar gets too low include: Double vision or blurry vision Fast or pounding heartbeat Feeling cranky or acting aggressive Feeling nervous Headache Hunger Shaking or trembling Sleeping trouble Sweating Tingling or numbness Continue reading >>

How Many Syllables Are In Hypoglycemia | Divide Hypoglycemia Into Syllables

How Many Syllables Are In Hypoglycemia | Divide Hypoglycemia Into Syllables

How many syllables are in hypoglycemia? 6 syllables Divide hypoglycemia into syllables: hy-po-gly-ce-mi-a Three syllable words that rhyme with Hypoglycemia femia Four syllable words that rhyme with Hypoglycemia anemia, bohemia, euphemia, geremia, jeremia, leukemia, uremia Five syllable words that rhyme with Hypoglycemia academia Six syllable words that rhyme with Hypoglycemia hypoglycemia What do you think of our answer to how many syllables are in hypoglycemia? Are the syllable count, pronunciation, words that rhyme, and syllable divisions for hypoglycemia correct? There are numerous syllabic anomalies found within the U.S. English language. Can hypoglycemia be pronounced differently? Did we divide the syllables correctly? Do regional variations in the pronunciation of hypoglycemia effect the syllable count? Has language changed? Provide your comments or thoughts on the syllable count for hypoglycemia below. Comment on the syllables in Hypoglycemia A comprehensive resource for finding syllables in hypoglycemia, how many syllables are in hypoglycemia, words that rhyme with hypoglycemia, how to divide hypoglycemia into syllables, how to pronounce hypoglycemia, how to break hypoglycemia into syllables, and how to pronounce hypoglycemia. Continue reading >>

How To Pronounce Hypoglycemia

How To Pronounce Hypoglycemia

Name Hypoglycemia syllable is: hy-po-gly-ce-mia (we separated the syllables with dashes). These names are examples to help you learn. They all have the same phonetic pronunciation as Hypoglycemia. If you know how to pronounce one of them you are already halfway there. All words and names have other phonetically similar sounding counter parts. This is a list of words that sound like Hypoglycemia when pronounced. Try saying different words to get a better idea for how to say Hypoglycemia. Letter H meaning for the name Hypoglycemia It is part of the brain letters and oscillating by corresponding to the mental registry while being very mobile and hesitant. It marks ambition, power and seeks to always be right. His interests are of a material nature, but its achievements remain very irregular. Letter Y meaning for the name Hypoglycemia This letter is from oscillating nature and intuitive, it corresponds to the register of hunches(fire element). Running on a mobile and hesitant functionality. Letter P meaning for the name Hypoglycemia It is part of the brain and oscillating letters and ranks in the registry of the mind with a hesitant and mobile functionality. Letter O meaning for the name Hypoglycemia Of emotional origin, emotional and creative, the O corresponds to the register of feelings with an dynamic and idealistic mind. It is appreciated for its sentimental and emotional virtues often beneficial to combat infidelity. Letter G meaning for the name Hypoglycemia It is part of the brain letters and down to earth. With its stable nature, she enrolled in the register of thoughts (air element). It symbolizes practical intelligence while being orderly and safe. It also offers a good memory. Letter L meaning for the name Hypoglycemia It is down to earth and serves under the br Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies

Tweet Diabetes can become serious in the short term if blood sugar levels become either too high or too low. The following information details what to do in an emergency. This covers low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), very high blood sugar (diabetic ketoacidosis) and what to do if you are left without your diabetes medication and/or supplies. What counts as a diabetic emergency? It can be a difficult area sometimes to know what counts as a genuine emergency. News reports in recent years have highlighted that a significant number of ‘999’ ambulance call-outs have not been necessary - for example to treat mild hypoglycemia which, in some cases, has been successfully treated befor e the ambulance has arrived. This isn’t to say that conditions, such as hypoglycemia, are not dangerous but that it’s important to know when a situation really is an emergency so that an ambulance is not unnecessarily called. When should I call an ambulance? An ambulance will be needed if someone has either very high or very low blood sugar levels that presents an immediate danger and neither they nor anyone around is confidently able to treat them. Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome are both life threatening conditions. Hypoglycemia can also be life threatening in some cases. Someone with diabetes that is unconscious is one of the situations in which you should call for an ambulance. If you have doubts about whether the situation is serious enough to warrant an ambulance, call 111. Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia can become dangerous if it is not treated quickly, particularly if it is a result of an insulin overdose. Severe hypoglycemia is generally recognised as hypoglycemia involving: Convulsions (fitting) Unconsciousness Hypoglycemia can often be treated at Continue reading >>

How To Pronounce Hypoglycemia Unawareness In English

How To Pronounce Hypoglycemia Unawareness In English

How do you pronounce hypoglycemia unawareness in English? Pronunciation of hypoglycemia unawareness in English, a free online verbalizing English dictionary. We are to pronounce hypoglycemia unawareness by audio dictionary. This pronounce audio dictionary implement More expeditious, most facile and best way to learn English words pronunciation, no downloads or plug-ins installation required to learn your personal pronunciation in digital mp3 audio in a few seconds, you additionally practice your voice and download audio files, you can provide more precise, better pronunciation voice for your friends! Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies

People with diabetes can experience life-threatening emergencies due to blood sugar levels being either too high or too low. Short-term complications such as low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to severe hypoglycemia, while high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) can result in diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS). Severe hypoglycemia can lead to unconsciousness or coma, while DKA can be a life-threatening complication of diabetes. In some cases, an ambulance may need to be called, but how can you identify what constitutes as a diabetic emergency? What are diabetic emergencies? Mild hypoglycemia can usually be treated at home, as can slightly high blood sugars, and will not require any emergency assistance. It can be difficult to assess when you should ring for an ambulance, with calls to 911 required to be completely necessary and in the event of no other options. An ambulance should only be called if you have very high or very low blood sugars and neither you, nor anybody nearby, is confident that they can help you. Situations that involve fitting, vomiting and unconsciousness, that can be attributed to diabetes, are extremely serious and require an ambulance to be called if nobody else can be of assistance. Severe hypoglycemia Severe hypoglycemia is generally recognised as hypoglycemia that can lead to convulsions (fitting) and unconsciousness. This situation can become dangerous without prompt treatment, especially if an insulin overdose has occurred or there is a risk of unconsciousness. If coherent enough, it may be that you can recover from very low blood sugar yourself, and it is your responsibility to make sure you always have sugar on you to treat hypos. Glucagon injection A safe and effective method of boosting som Continue reading >>

Neonatal Hypoglycemia | Birth Injury Video Library

Neonatal Hypoglycemia | Birth Injury Video Library

Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common problems encountered by nursery staff after a baby is born. Simply put, neonatal hypoglycemia occurs when a baby’s blood sugar is lower than normal. Through this video, learn more about neonatal hypoglycemia and why it’s so important for health care providers to manage properly. Transcript: Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common problems encountered by staff in the nursery after a child is born. It simply means that the baby’s sugar is lower than what it should be. Now, generally, that is defined as something less than thirty milligrams per deciliter within the first 24 hours of life, or forty-five milligrams per deciliter thereafter. If the problem is not detected and treated quickly, it can have long-term consequences for that child. There is a group of newborns that clinicians know will have problems metabolizing sugar. Specifically, children who are born of mothers with gestational diabetes. They have had a great deal of blood sugar coursing through their veins because the mother was producing that excess sugar while they were in utero. When that baby is born, suddenly that supply of excess blood sugar is cut off. But yet the baby was producing a lot of insulin to compensate and metabolize that blood sugar. Once that baby is born, it takes a while for the baby’s system to realize Hey, we’re not getting all that blood sugar anymore and we don’t need all of that insulin to be produced. As a consequence, when that baby is born, it can have a dangerously low blood sugar level, and it needs to be corrected promptly, either with intravenous therapy or with a feeding. It is important for those children to be monitored closely once they’ve had an abnormal level because that’s an indication to the clini Continue reading >>

American Pronunciation Of

American Pronunciation Of

Use our interactive phonemic chart to hear each symbol spoken, followed by an example of the sound in a word. used as a way of drawing attention to something clever and funny that you have just said or written BuzzWord Article A must for anyone with an interest in the changing face of language. The Macmillan Dictionary blog explores English as it is spoken around the world today. global English and language change from our blog American pronunciation of hypoglycemia from the online English dictionary from Macmillan Publishers Limited. Continue reading >>

How To Pronounce Hypoglycemia

How To Pronounce Hypoglycemia

This page is made for those who don’t know how to pronounce Hypoglycemia in English. Above there is a transcription of this term and an audio file with correct pronunciation. This term consists of 6 syllables.In beginning, you need to say sound "hahy", than say "poh" and after all other syllables "glahy-see-mee-uh". We currently working on improvements to this page. In nearest future, there will be Hypoglycemia pronunciation in Spanish, French, German and Portuguese. Stay tuned and study speak words correctly with Word Panda. Continue reading >>

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