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How To Prevent Ketosis In Dairy Cows

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Prevention And Treatment Of Postpartum Diseases

Prevention and Treatment of Postpartum Diseases David T. Galligan and James D. Ferguson Center for Animal Health and Productivity University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine [ Previous | Next ] Introduction The dry period has historically been viewed as a time of rest for the cow between lactation. In fact the dry period is a time in the life cycle of the cow where dramatic physiological changes are occurring in preparation for the upcoming lactation. Many of these pre-partum changes (discussed in detail by other authors of this proceedings) and the management response to them influence the risk of a spectrum of disease conditions to occur in early lactation. Diseases associated with parturition (dystocia, uterine prolapse, retained placenta, metritis, milk fever) are estimated to account for 8% of all diseases in dairy cows (Roine and Saloniemi, 1978). Disease incidence is the highest in the 50 days immediately after calving and increases with age due to the increased occurrence of production related diseases such as milk fever and ketosis. Approximately 50% of lactations are associated with at least one or more disease events (Bigrass-Poulin et al, 1990). Disease ca Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. everything red

    had the vet out today with a 2nd calver,calved about 2wks with a case of ketosis,the vet went on to tell me about a bolus that they had only started to supply called kextone,he didn't know a lot about it because anyone that has used it hasn't had anything calved yet or long enough to know,what he did say on the down side was that it can blow up a big calf, the cost is £30 and you give it 4wks before calving,has anyone used such a thing,TIA

  2. beefyfarmer

    It's actually a legal Monensin (Rumensin) bolus. My vet says they work very well. He has several farmers dosing every cow -though not to sure whether it's just for ketosis They cost about £30 and the cow gives an extra £60 worth of milk. Perhaps I'm just being cynical but no doubt they will find a "medical" reason to give it to beef cattle before long.

  3. james.taylor

    My vet gave me one in the spring to use on a young bull that was suffering badly from recurring bloat on grass. I wanted to use him for breeding so wasnt keen on a dart.
    It worked very well and very quickly

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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The Estrous Cycle by Richard Pursley

An Attempt To Prevent Production Diseases In Dairy And Ad Hoc Treatment Cows By Intense Monitoring

A trial has been performed on 201 dairy cows from two Italian commercial herds in order to verify whether the mitigation of a recognized negative energy balance (NEB) by a therapeutic mean may influence the incidence of peri-partum diseases. All animals were tested for beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-HOB) and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) three times a week from 2 weeks before the expected due time to 2 weeks after calving. Animals whose blood levels were above β-HOB>1.2 or NEFA>0.5 mmol/L were declared POSITIVE and then split in two groups. Group T animals (n=57) were treated with a glycogenic treatment (ENERGAN KETOSIS, Virbac). The treatment was repeated daily as long as biochemical values remained abnormal. Group C animals (n=48) served as untreated controls. Animals with values within the physiological range over the study period were said NEGATIVE (n=96). This study confirmed that animals presenting excessive β-HOB or NEFA concentrations show a higher risk to get sick during the study period (P<0.05), the major risk being clinical ketosis (P<0.01) and in a lesser extend retention of the placenta (P=0.09). The application of a glycogenic treatment did not show an impact on bloo Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. everything red

    had the vet out today with a 2nd calver,calved about 2wks with a case of ketosis,the vet went on to tell me about a bolus that they had only started to supply called kextone,he didn't know a lot about it because anyone that has used it hasn't had anything calved yet or long enough to know,what he did say on the down side was that it can blow up a big calf, the cost is £30 and you give it 4wks before calving,has anyone used such a thing,TIA

  2. beefyfarmer

    It's actually a legal Monensin (Rumensin) bolus. My vet says they work very well. He has several farmers dosing every cow -though not to sure whether it's just for ketosis They cost about £30 and the cow gives an extra £60 worth of milk. Perhaps I'm just being cynical but no doubt they will find a "medical" reason to give it to beef cattle before long.

  3. james.taylor

    My vet gave me one in the spring to use on a young bull that was suffering badly from recurring bloat on grass. I wanted to use him for breeding so wasnt keen on a dart.
    It worked very well and very quickly

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Prevent Milk Fever, Ketosis In Cows

NAIROBI: A significant number of farmers has incurred huge losses from treatments, loss of milk and even death of high yielding cows from milk fever and Ketosis. This has created fear of keeping high producing cows. This disease is our focus today: Milk Fever (Hypocalcaemia): Milk Fever (Hypocalcaemia) refers to life threateningly low levels of calcium in the cow’s blood. It can occur 24 hours before calving but mostly within 48 to 72 hours after calving, mostly in high yielding cows. Older cows are more susceptible because they produce more milk. This is because milk contains a lot of calcium (about 1.220 g per kg). If the cow produces 20 kg of milk in one day it will suddenly require to put about 24gm of calcium into all of this milk. If the calcium from the diet and that being mobilised from the bones is not enough for transfer to the milk this will result in a severe drop of calcium in the blood leading to hypocalcaemia. Milk fever is also associated with cows that are too fat at calving. Milk fever or low calcium in the blood (hypocalcaemia) manifests as tremors and unsteadiness. Eventually the cow sits down with a kink in the neck and is unable to rise. It will become const Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. everything red

    had the vet out today with a 2nd calver,calved about 2wks with a case of ketosis,the vet went on to tell me about a bolus that they had only started to supply called kextone,he didn't know a lot about it because anyone that has used it hasn't had anything calved yet or long enough to know,what he did say on the down side was that it can blow up a big calf, the cost is £30 and you give it 4wks before calving,has anyone used such a thing,TIA

  2. beefyfarmer

    It's actually a legal Monensin (Rumensin) bolus. My vet says they work very well. He has several farmers dosing every cow -though not to sure whether it's just for ketosis They cost about £30 and the cow gives an extra £60 worth of milk. Perhaps I'm just being cynical but no doubt they will find a "medical" reason to give it to beef cattle before long.

  3. james.taylor

    My vet gave me one in the spring to use on a young bull that was suffering badly from recurring bloat on grass. I wanted to use him for breeding so wasnt keen on a dart.
    It worked very well and very quickly

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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