diabetestalk.net

How To Induce Ketosis

5 Simple Steps To Get Into Ketosis

5 Simple Steps To Get Into Ketosis

I think almost everyone agrees with me when I say that the ketogenic diet is probably one of the most complex and difficult eating plans out there. Even when you’re not on a diet or trying to lose weight you still have to bring a lot of attention to detail. Getting into ketosis isn’t as important as we would think, but there are still 5 simple steps we can make to get into a ketotic state. What Needs to Happen The conditions of nutritional ketosis are: Low blood sugar levels (about <85 mg/dl) Low insulin And because of that there are going to be: Higher glucagon, which is released by the liver, in response to low insulin, to increase the amount of fatty acids in the blood stream. High serum blood ketone levels, with the optimal zone being in between 0.5 and 3.0 mMols. Here are the 5 simple steps to get into ketosis. Step #1 Do a 24-Hour Fast Ketosis is the by-product of a prolonged period of fasting. After your liver glycogen stores have been depleted already after an overnight fast, the liver then begins to create more ketone bodies. After 2-3 days of fasting, you’ll be definitely in ketosis. Your brain will adapt to using ketone bodies and gets about 75% of its energy from fat. Overall, the body’s glucose demands and protein catabolism get reduced to a bare minimum. However, to get into ketosis we don’t necessarily have to abstain from eating that long. We’re already in mild ketosis in the morning and doing a 24-hour fast will increase our ketogenic pathways by a significant amount. Step #2 Start Eating Low Carb Ketogenic Meals Once you finish your 24-hours, you can start eating keto foods. Make your first meal something extremely ketogenic, meaning: Ultra-low carbs – cruciferous vegetables, like spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, chard. Your Continue reading >>

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

One of the reasons The Bulletproof Diet with Bulletproof Coffee works so well for people looking to lose weight is that Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting helps your body to more easily enter a state called cyclical ketosis, which is great for a whole bunch of reasons. Ketosis is a cornerstone of becoming Bulletproof; listen to these recent Bulletproof Radio episodes with ketosis experts Jimmy Moore and Dominic D’Agostino to get the scoop on how and why it works. It’s what happens when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar for energy, and it only happens when you eat almost no carbohydrates, or when you hack it using certain kinds of oils. Many people first stumble upon the idea of ketosis while looking for a weight loss strategy. That can be a major part of it for so many people out there who have tried just about every other diet out there but haven’t seen the results they’d hoped for. But when people experience the mental clarity and focus that ketosis brings, the game changes! This post walks you through one of the most important yet underrated mechanisms that makes ketosis so effective for people who have tried everything else to lose weight and failed to keep it off: appetite suppression. Ketosis works for weight loss in the short term, but that’s not why it’s so amazing. Short term weight loss is easy (I’ve lost at least 200 pounds of short term weight…because it always roared back on with a vengeance so I could lose it again!) When you look at keeping your weight off forever, ketosis provides a level of appetite suppression that is actually liberating. Ketosis helps you literally stop thinking about food all the time. Why Calorie Counting Is So Ineffective One of the reasons old-fashioned, calorie-restricted diets tend to fail is becau Continue reading >>

Journey Into Ketosis Part Ii

Journey Into Ketosis Part Ii

TL;DR This is a journal of my first month of ketosis. A quick recap of Part I: Ketosis is when your body metabolizes fat instead of sugar as its primary fuel source. To enter ketosis you must eat fewer than 50 grams of carbs per day for a minimum of two weeks, and ideally 60-80% of your diet is fat. You can measure blood ketones with over-the counter-tests. Ketones are the preferred fuel for organs like your brain, heart, and muscles. Ketosis is safe and all humans show improved blood lipid profiles, profound anti-inflammation, and weight loss with lean muscle mass preservation in ketosis, better than any other diet. May 2014: The Descent Of Insulin I had just returned from a two week long trip to Israel and Jordan. On the flight back I finished reading The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Living, which answered all my questions about ketosis. (The Art and Science...Performance is a wonderful, short follow up, and Keto Clarity is on the to-read list.) I had been "paleo" for about five years, which for me meant avoiding grains and most sugars. I was not striving for high fat, and I still occasionally craved sugar. One way to know you've achieved ketosis is measuring blood levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BOHB. It's the fuel your liver produces when it metabolizes fat. Your organs, especially your brain, consume it copiously. You can measure BOHB by pricking your finger with a Precision Xtra lance, bleeding on to a ketone test strip, inserting the strip into the Precision Xtra, and waiting. It will spit out your blood ketone density in milligrams of ketones per millimoler of blood. The (semi-arbitrarily) decided on level for a human to be in "nutritional ketosis" is a minimum of 0.5 mg/mmL. I was eating "low carb" for five years, so I figured this was easy, and I was Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Eating fat to burn fat sounds contradictory, if not nuts, right? The world is full of people who are fat because of high-fat diets, so why would a fit person want to follow suit? I'm not talking about stuffing your face full of peanut butter cups. I'm talking about following a ketogenic diet—or, put simply, a high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diet designed to make the body burn fat for fuel. Bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, and researchers alike have found that such diets are an effective fat-loss tool. In fact, studies have shown that ketogenic diets induce numerous favorable metabolic and physiological changes, including weight loss, less oxidative stress, improved body composition, reduced inflammation, and increased insulin sensitivity.[1-4] That being said, what does the science surrounding ketogenic diets have to say about individuals looking to run faster or farther, jump higher, or improve other aspects of sports performance? Shouldn't athletes be swilling Gatorade before, during, and after their events instead of adopting a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate diet? Not necessarily. Ketogenic diets have become increasingly popular among athletes ranging from Olympic competitors to endurance runners, with good reason. Let's take a closer look at the science. What Exactly Is A Ketogenic Diet, Anyway? Ketogenic diets are very high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets.[5] The exact breakdown of the diet varies between individuals, but a general profile may reflect 70-75 percent fat, 15-20 percent protein, and only 5-10 percent carbohydrate. So, you're probably thinking, all I need to do then is watch out for the carbs, right? Not exactly. Ketogenic diets are not the same as high-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets. I often hear Continue reading >>

Dr. Osborn: 5 Biggest Mistakes Made When “going Keto”

Dr. Osborn: 5 Biggest Mistakes Made When “going Keto”

“The ketogenic diet can be somewhat treacherous, at least during the induction phase. Why? Simple. You are essentially “forcing” your body to use an alternate energy source, namely ketones, which are the metabolic by-products of fatty acid breakdown. This is accomplished by dropping daily carbohydrate load significantly in order to ultimately deplete liver glycogen stores, the “on-switch” for ketogenesis. This metabolic shift or transition is uncomfortable because the body is patterned to use glucose as a source of cellular energy as opposed to fat, even if your diet is “clean.” Most people are eating more high glycemic index carbohydrates than they believe and are therefore unconsciously conditioning their bodies to utilize sugar as opposed to the body’s fuel of choice: fat. They’re pouring sugar into their gas tanks as opposed to clean-burning petroleum-based fuel, in essence, fat. Given this “metabolic inertia,” the body resists the change to an alternate fuel source and revolts. Enter mistake #1: Inducing ketosis too quickly: Acutely and drastically cutting daily carbohydrate load to less than 25 grams to induce ketosis will predispose one to the so-called “keto flu,” characterized by fatigue, irritability and headaches, to name a few. Why be miserable? Induce ketosis by gradually reducing your daily carbohydrate intake (load) while concomitantly reducing the glycemic indexes of the consumed carbohydrates. Both will lower the body’s insulin signal, deplete glycogen stores and allow for a smoother transition into ketosis. But there’s more to winning this battle, and the transition is truly a metabolic battle of sorts. Not drinking enough water: Flu-like symptoms are, to a great degree, caused by fluid and electrolyte abnormalities, the r Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

The Top Tips For Getting Into Ketosis Quickly

The Top Tips For Getting Into Ketosis Quickly

Ketosis is a metabolic state where the body starts producing ketone out of fat and your body converts fat into compounds known as ketones and begins using them as its main source of energy. So, instead of your body using carbs for energy, it will shoot for fats. Ketogenic diets have become incredibly popular in the recent years with more and more people starting to practice diets such as Atkins, Keto, Low-carb, Slow-carb and much more ketogenic related diets. The first step to starting off a ketogenic diet is to put your body into a ketosis state. One of the hardest things that beginners struggle with is getting themselves into ketosis. In this article, we’ll cover the top tips for getting your body into ketosis and the health benefits behind a ketogenic diet. Weight Loss There are a lot of health benefits associated with ketosis. One of the most common ones is weight loss. Most people put their body into ketosis to speed up their weight loss process. One of the reasons for this is that ketogenic diets tend to get rid of excess water from the body. Our body is mainly made up of water and when you are eating a lot of carbs, our body will naturally retain those water. With a ketogenic diet insulin levels are lowered, the results of this is that the kidneys start shedding excess sodium, leading to rapid weight loss in the first week or two. This is why a lot of people tend to drop a lot of weight quickly in the early weeks. This is usually just water weight that was retained over time. In this study, which compared low-fat diets vs low-carb diets. People with low-carb diets tend to lose weight 2-3x faster than people on a low-fat diet. Another reason for people losing more weight on Ketogenic diets is because your body will go straight into fat burning mode after it’s Continue reading >>

6 Tips To Get You Into Ketosis Quickly

6 Tips To Get You Into Ketosis Quickly

A lot has changed since the ketogenic diet was first prescribed as a diet for epilepsy. People are now using ketosis to help with everything from losing weight to better health in general. For most people, it takes around 1-3 days to get into ketosis, but there can be ways to speed up the process. This article will cover 6 tips to get you into ketosis quickly. Benefits of Getting Into Ketosis Being in ketosis, when the body is breaking down fat and using ketones for fuel, and eating a ketogenic diet often come with benefits such as: Weight loss: ketosis and a ketogenic diet can reduce hunger and cravings while increasing satiety Reduced risk of diseases: lower risk of diseases such as heart disease, type II diabetes, and even cancer Higher energy levels: less blood sugar spikes, and overall better well-being Besides speeding up these benefits by getting into ketosis sooner, you can also circumvent some possible side effects. When your body is getting into ketosis, it’s switching from using glucose for energy to using fats (broken down to ketones). The time in between can cause certain flu-like side effects in some people, like fatigue, dizziness, sugar cravings, brain fog, and stomach trouble, often called the “keto flu.” By getting into ketosis faster, you can skip past the transition period and start enjoy the benefits of ketosis sooner. And now, here are our top tips for doing that: Top 6 Ketosis Tips Give these steps a try for getting into ketosis faster: #1 Drastically Cut Carbs The general carb limit for the keto diet is around 30 grams for most people. This keeps the body from using those carbs for energy and reversing the ketosis process — or preventing it altogether. But if you want to get into ketosis faster, cutting carbs below this amount is a great Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

Any diet, by definition, is a group of foods consumed for a certain period of time. A “diet” can be as simple as an average daily meal or it can also be part of a treatment program for specific medical conditions. The ketogenic diet, which allows someone to enter a state of nutritional “ketosis”, has long been used in the treatment of epilepsy in children – but its benefits go way beyond this. As you’ll learn, recent studies show that a ketogenic diet can have many uses and benefits – including weight loss, reduced inflammation, cancer-prevention, as more. History of Ketogenic Diets The ketogenic diet was first introduced in 1924 at the Mayo clinic by Dr. Russel Wilder who started the diet to treat epileptic patients. He put his patients on a “fast” and found that epileptic symptoms became less frequent. The popularity of this diet as a means of controlling epilepsy has decreased since this time since powerful anticonvulsant drugs have been invented, but this doesn’t mean that ketogenic diets are not promoted for better health any longer. Since its introduction in the 1920s, the ketogenic diet and entering ketosis remains controversial until today. Although it has many benefits and is a natural approach to controlling disease in some cases, many doctors and patients often find it easier to administer pills than to adhere to a ketogenic diet that they find “strict’ and restrictive. The exact mechanism by which the ketogenic diet works still isn’t 100% known, but the results of ketosis that have been researched for years are staggering. What is A Ketogenic Diet? Today ketogenic diets get the most attention when it comes to weight loss and blood sugar control. “Burn fat by eating more fat” is one simple way to describe the approach that allows Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

As The Eating Academy approaches its first birthday in about a month, I figured it was as good a time as any to put together some thoughts on a subject I get asked about with great frequency. (For those wondering when I’ll get to Part X of The Straight Dope on Cholesterol, the answer is, “hopefully before the end of the year.”) A few months ago I was planning a post along the lines of “the 10 things you need to know about ketosis,” but I’m now thinking that might be putting the proverbial cart before the horse. So, let’s start with a more fundamental set of questions. In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that you’ll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of “experts” out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want to actually understand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I don’t expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you. But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know it’s trendy to make blanket statements – ketosis is “unnatural,” for example, or ketosis is “superior” – but such statements mean nothing if you don’t understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, let’s agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, I’ve deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. What is ketosis? Ketosis is Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

What Is The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet?

A ketogenic diet is a style of weight loss plan where the body is forced to enter a state called ketosis. The human body is designed to work with either carbohydrate, stored in the muscles as glycogen, or fat as its primary fuel source. If glycogen is present, the body will use that up first before beginning to burn fat. Ketosis is the state where the body uses fat as its primary energy source, which leads to healthy but rapid weight loss. To make your body enter ketosis, you need to follow a diet that is very low in carbohydrate, so your body has to switch to using fat for energy. The Atkins diet, and other well known low carb eating plans, are examples of ketogenic dieting. The Downsides to Ketogenic Dieting Some of the main complaints people have about ketogenic diets are that while they are undeniably effective, the lack of carb powered energy can make it hard for them to work out at their normal level, and that the absence of carbs can make the diet very hard to stick to long term – people simply enjoy eating carbs. If you find a ketogenic diet difficult for either of these reasons, a cyclical ketogenic diet could be the answer. What is a Cyclical Ketogenic Diet? A cyclical ketogenic diet is where you follow a standard ketogenic diet from Monday to Friday, incorporating three workouts into your week, and then on weekends you load up on carbs and don’t exercise. This works because carb loading allows you to store up some carbohydrate energy for the week ahead, helping you keep a reasonable level of strength up for your workouts (you won’t break any personal records, but you’ll feel good) and preventing your body from going into “starvation mode” (where weight loss slows down) as a result of the low calorie intake on your ketogenic diet days. This also me Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Recently I had a client tell me that she and her husband were eating more than 2 pounds of bacon a week—usually three strips for breakfast and one or two with a salad for dinner. I’ve been a dietitian for almost 20 years. Few things surprise me. But I had to ask: “Why?” She told me that her husband had heard about a new diet on TV, the keto diet, and they decided to try it. Six months and countless packages of bacon later, her husband had lost 20 pounds and said he felt more energetic. I’m beginning to hear more and more people lecture me about the benefits of the ketogenic diet. “Keto burns fat fast! It turbo-charges your energy! It fights disease! You can eat all the bacon you want!” But as is so often the case with diets, underneath all the initial excitement, there’s a gut check. Here’s everything you should know about the ketogenic diet and whether or not you should try it for yourself. Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so your brain signals it to tap its reserve of ketones. It’s like a hybrid car that runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity. Okay, but what are ketones? They’re compounds created by your liver from your fat stores when blood insulin is low. “Your liver produces ketones all the time, but the rate depends on carbohydrate and protein intake,” says Jeff Volek, Ph.D., R.D., a professor of human sciences at Ohio State University. Eat a normal amount of carbs and protein, and ketogenesis idles. Cut carbs and protein back, and you push to half throttle. This takes about three days to induce. A ketogenic diet requires that fat comprise 60 to 80 percent of your total calo Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Ketosis Induction Phase Survival Guide

The Ultimate Ketosis Induction Phase Survival Guide

As someone who has gone through the ketosis induction phase many times now I felt like writing a ketosis induction phase survival guide, so to speak. I’m currently on day 5 of ketosis induction and want to share a day-by-day analysis of what to expect during keto-induction including hunger levels, energy levels, physical changes both internal and external and anything else you may find during your own induction phase. I’ll start with a little info on the keto-induction phase before moving into my daily expectations log and finally provide tips and suggestions on how to survive induction and speed up the induction process a little. What is ketosis induction? Ketosis induction (or keto-induction) is the process of your body moving from a glucose fueled metabolism to a ketone fueled metabolism. This means your body, once depleted of remaining glycogen stores, starts adapting itself to breaking down fat into ketones as an alternative fuel source to survive. It takes time for your body to adjust and become efficient at using its new fuel source. Once the induction phase completes, we call it being keto-adapted, meaning your body has now adapted to using fat as it’s primary fuel source. How long does keto-induction take? This varies from person to person and hence everyone’s experience, my own included, may differ greatly from another’s experience. The average time for keto-induction seems to be about 2 weeks according to most people’s experience but I have heard of it ranging from just a few days, up to 8 weeks. For me, it depends on how long I’ve been out of ketosis. If I’ve had a single day of carb bingeing I can get back into ketosis in a day or two. I didn’t watch my diet at all last month though and expect induction to be a full 2 weeks, which is about Continue reading >>

8 Tips And Tricks For How To Get Into Ketosis Fast

8 Tips And Tricks For How To Get Into Ketosis Fast

Ketosis is a natural biological process that plays a key role in health. The process has become particularly relevant in a specific type of diet known as a ketosis diet or a ketogenic diet, which is powerful for weight loss. While your body is in ketosis it relies on fat as the main source of energy by first converting it to compounds known as ketones. The ketones themselves are thought to help suppress the appetite and may be a key reason why the diet approach helps with weight loss (1,2). There are a number of different signs that you are in ketosis and ketogenic diets rely on these and your diet patterns to keep you in ketosis. But, if you’re going to rely on ketosis, then you have to figure out how to get into ketosis fast – and stay there. Achieving that is absolutely critical to get the health benefits of ketosis and to lose weight. More than anything, your carb intake influences whether or not you are in ketosis. This is true when you are first trying to reach ketosis and also as you are trying to stay there. The reason for this is that the body preferentially uses glucose as its main source of energy. This glucose comes from the carbs that you eat. So, when you are consuming carbs regularly, your body tends to use these as the main source of fuel. However, if you dramatically decrease your carbs, then your body is forced to switch to other fuel sources. Specifically, this results in the production of ketone bodies, which then act as fuel (3,4). To decrease your carb intake, you can rely on low carb vegetables and fruits, as well as recipes specifically designed for low carb or ketosis diets. For example, the following lists are great places to begin. Now, the precise number of carbs that you can consume and remain in ketosis varies from one person to the nex Continue reading >>

More in ketosis