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How To Flush Out Ketones

Five Things To Know About Ketones

Five Things To Know About Ketones

If you live with diabetes, you have probably heard that ketones are something to watch out for. That they have something to do with the dreaded diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). But do you really understand what ketones are and why they happen? It’s scary to think about, sure. But it’s also very important to be in the know about ketones and to be prepared. 1) What are ketones? If there isn’t enough insulin in your system, you can’t turn glucose into energy. So your body starts breaking down body fat. Ketones are a chemical by-product of this process. This can occur when people with type 1 diabetes don’t take insulin for long periods of time, when insulin pumps fail to deliver insulin and the wearer does not monitor blood glucose, or during serious illness (in type 1 or type 2) when insulin doses are missed or not increased appropriately for the stress of illness. Ketones can happen to anyone with diabetes, but the condition is more common in people with type 1. 2) Why are ketones dangerous? Ketones upset the chemical balance of your blood and, if left untreated, can poison the body. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Eventually they build up in the blood. The presence of ketones could be a sign that you are experiencing, or will soon develop, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a life-threatening medical emergency. 3) When should I test for ketones, and how? There are several situations in which it is a good idea to check for ketones, usually every four to six hours. Talk to your doctor to know what makes the most sense for you and your diabetes management plan. Your blood glucose is more than 300 mg/dl (or a level recommended by your doctor) You feel nauseated, are vomiting or have abdominal pain You are Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis – while it may be one of the only things to rhyme with supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, this serious condition needs immediate attention and more than just a spoonful of sugar for treatment. In fact, your sugar levels can get dangerously high when ketones build up in your blood stream. The body creates ketones when it uses fat cells for energy instead of available glucose. It is normal to produce some ketones, especially if you are aiming to lose weight. But if you test positive for ketones and have at least two or more high blood glucose readings within two hours, it’s time to call your doctor. What are the causes and symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA)? DKA happens when your body cannot get access to glucose as source of energy because there is little or no insulin available. Your body then breaks down fat instead for fuel. They byproduct of this process are ketones, an acid which can be poisonous in high levels.[1] You are also more likely to develop DKA if you are stressed or have an infection. Ketones can be tested through urine on a special strip. You can ask your doctor which ketone test they recommend, but depending on your region an over-the-counter ketone test kit can picked up from your pharmacist. Read the instructions for the ketone test kit you choose. In general, you can urinate over the test area of the strip or collect your urine in a clean container and then place the test area of the strip into the cup. The strip will change color based on the level of ketones in your urine. The ketone test kit will include a color chart to compare your results and find the range of ketones present.[2] In most cases the development of DKA progresses slowly. If you experience any vomiting, it may be a sign DKA will progress more rapidly Continue reading >>

Can Ketosis Help You Pass A Drug Test?

Can Ketosis Help You Pass A Drug Test?

Just like most potheads, I’m into my health and have tried a few different types of diets. I would say that at least half to most of the year, I’m in ketosis. It isn’t too hard to maintain and has a number of health benefits, but can you use ketosis to pass a drug test? Ketosis: Whats is Ketosis? How to do the Ketogenic Diet? When are you Keto-Adaptive? Detox with Ketosis Using Ketosis as a THC Detox Ketosis Can Mess Up Urine Drug Test Results? Trigger a false positive for a urine drug test? How Long Does It Take To Detox Weed With Ketosis? Improving your chances Whats is Ketosis? Ketosis is actually a metabolic state that results from a prolonged lack of carbohydrates in your diet. By cutting carbohydrates from your diet, your body will naturally switch from using glycogen for energy to Fat. When you eat carbs, your body is in the “normal” metabolic state of Glycolysis. That means your body is converting carbs and sugars into Glycogen, a simple and readily available form of energy. Eating carbs triggers insulin, a hormone that travels through the blood and stores nutrients and fat from your bloodstream. When your are in the state of ketogenesis, insulin levels stay almost flat. So instead of storing fat and nutrients like THC into fat cells, your body burns it. top How to do the Ketogenic Diet As stated above, the ketosis diet is simple to follow. Just don’t eat carbs, that means staying away from bread, sweets, fruits, starchy vegetables and sugar. You are only allowed to eat foods high in fats, proteins and fiber. So basically that would include leafy greens, meats and cheeses. Its all so important to note, that increasing your fiber and electrolytes intake is crucial! 90% of all the bad stuff you hear about the ketosis diet is do lack of electrolytes and Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

What are ketones and what causes them? Ketones are the result of the body burning fat for energy or fuel. For a person with diabetes, ketones are often the result of prolonged high blood sugar and insulin deficiency. Without the right amount of insulin, glucose starts to build up in the blood stream and doesn't enter the cells. The cells burn fat instead of glucose, and ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. Some causes of high blood sugar are: Missing an insulin dose or skipping some oral medications. A disconnected or blocked insulin pump tube. Being sick with the flu. High levels of stress. Eating more carbohydrates than your medication covers. What are the signs that I should test for ketones? Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, frequent thirst, blurry vision, dry mouth, vomiting, and fatigue. There are several scenarios that should prompt a test for ketones. If your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. When your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl and you are planning on exercising. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and whenever blood sugars are elevated. How do I test for ketones? There are two ways to test for ketones - by testing your urine or your blood. Ketones appear first in the blood stream and are later present in the urine, so testing your blood for ketones is the best way to check for an early problem. To check urine for ketones, you must collect a urine sample or dip a ketone test strip into a fresh stream of urine. After waiting for the time suggested by the ketone strip manufacturer, you compare the color strip to the chart on the bottle. The darker the color, the higher the amount of ketones in the urine. At this time, there are just a few mete Continue reading >>

Ketones — The 6 Must-knows

Ketones — The 6 Must-knows

WRITTEN BY: Kyla Schmieg, BSN, RN Editor’s Note: Kyla Schmieg (BSN, RN) is a practicing pediatric endocrinology nurse in Cincinnati, OH, USA, and Type 1 Diabetic, working on the same unit she was diagnosed at 26 years ago. 1 – What are ketones? Ketones are chemicals that build up when your body starts to burn fat for energy. The most common cause of ketones in diabetics is insulin deficiency. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood stream and can’t enter cells. The cells then burn fat instead of glucose. This results in ketones forming in the blood and eventually spilling into urine. 2 – Why can ketones be dangerous? Having ketones can indicate that your body needs more insulin. (Always monitor your blood sugar levels to know how much insulin you need.) If you have a build up of ketones, this can lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Signs of DKA include moderate or large ketones, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fruity or acetone (think nail polish remover) breath, rapid breathing, flushed skin, and lack of energy. If left untreated, it can lead to a serious and life-threatening diabetic coma or death. High levels of ketones are toxic to the body and if you’re experiencing these, you should seek out medical attention. 3 – When should you check for ketones? You should be checked anytime your blood sugar is above 240 mg/dl (13.3 mmol/l) or any time you are sick. This includes any minor illness such as a cold. 4 – Can you get ketones with a high blood sugar? Ketones typically accompany high blood sugar. They indicate that your body needs more insulin. Most often if your body needs more insulin, it means you probably have a high blood sugar. Also, when an illness is present, your body releases hormones in response to the stress. These hormones Continue reading >>

Presence Of Ketones In Urine – Its Causes And How To Reduce It?

Presence Of Ketones In Urine – Its Causes And How To Reduce It?

An important healthy process in the body is the metabolizing of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. This metabolizing or burning of these three elements is critical in order for the body to generate energy. This process in turn helps with the enzymatic and metabolic processes found and needed by each cell in the body. In regards to the fuel source for metabolic action, carbohydrates are first burned as a fuel source and followed by fats and then proteins. Continue reading >>

Sick-day Rules For Managing Your Diabetes

Sick-day Rules For Managing Your Diabetes

When people come down with minor illnesses such as flu, cold, urinary tract infection, or intestinal problems, they usually lose their appetites and have very low energy levels. Most would want to stay in bed, take some over-the-counter medication, sleep, and let the medication and their immune systems do their jobs to kick the illness to the curb. However, for individuals with diabetes, a common sickness or infection is not as easy to fight off. Without careful care management, the fluctuation of glucose and ketone levels can trigger severe complications. If left unattended, these complications can become life-threatening medical emergency cases such as diabetic coma. To avoid such daunting situations, the best way to cope with a minor illness is to learn, plan, and prepare ahead of time. So when you do become sick, you will know exactly what to expect and what protocols to follow under different scenarios. At the same time, you will already have all the supplies at home. This way, you will feel safe and secure, and you can concentrate on getting better. In order to help you prepare for a sick day management plan and kit, this article will cover these topics: What Happens to Your Body and Your Blood Glucose When You Are Sick? Depending on general health, age, and hormonal differences, each person reacts slightly different to illness. But generally, when you are sick, you are under stress. To counteract, your body releases stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisone into the bloodstream to activate glucose production in the liver. This reaction leads to a rise of blood glucose levels above normal level and desensitization of the blood glucose-lowering effects of insulin. Under these circumstances, even the most stable diabetes becomes much harder to control within Continue reading >>

How To Get Rid Of Ketones In Urine

How To Get Rid Of Ketones In Urine

When this happens, the body, not having sufficient insulin to get energy into the body's cells, breaks down body tissue (fat and muscle) into ketones, which can be used as fuel without the need diabetes sometimes get ketones during an illness. Ketones in urine is most common . Eventually they build up in the blood. 3) When Apr 29, 2006 1. Your body gets rid of ketones by emptying them into your urine. This happens when your body does not have enough insulin to turn sugar into energy. What can I do to get rid of these ketones? said i did really good. . Ketones are made when your body turns fat into energy. The presence of ketones could be a sign that you are experiencing, or will soon develop, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a life-threatening medical emergency. It will take much more rapid insulin than normal to bring blood sugars down when ketones are present in the urine or blood. Ideally, ketone readings should be negative to a trace. You should test again in a few hours. The body tries to get rid of these ketones by spilling them into the urine. If your body is producing lots of ketones, your body will become acidic. The build-up of ketones in the blood is called ketoacidosis. Drinking plenty of water WILL help you to get rid of ketones, but it won't prevent your body from producing more not whilst your blood glucose levels are Checking for ketones. You might also have ketones if you are not eating enough carbohydrates and your body uses fat for energy instead. I went back into the bathroom and grabbed my Ketostix to check my urine for Ketones. So I'm thinking that the ketones must be Mar 13, 2015 Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. This is caused by the increased level of ketones, rather than the high Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency related to diabetes. It’s also the most likely time for a child with diabetes to die.” DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose; the person is dehydrated; and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. The initial insulin deficit is most often caused by the onset of diabetes, by an illness or infection, or by not taking insulin when it is needed. Ketones are your brain’s “second-best fuel,” Hellman says, with glucose being number one. If you don’t have enough glucose in your cells to supply energy to your brain, yo Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis in cats at a glance Ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes in which ketones and blood sugar levels build up in the body due to insufficient levels of insulin which is required to move glucose into the cells for energy. As a result, the body uses fat as an alternate energy source which produces ketones causing the blood to become too acidic. Common causes include uncontrolled diabetes, missed or insufficient insulin, surgery, infection, stress and obesity. Symptoms of ketoacidosis include increased urination and thirst, dehydration, nausea, diarrhea, confusion, rapid breathing which may later change to laboured breathing. What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening complication of diabetes characterised by metabolic acidosis (increased acids in the blood), hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and ketonuria (ketones in the urine). It is caused by a lack of or insufficient amounts of insulin which is required to move glucose from the bloodstream and into the cells to be used for energy. When this occurs, the body begins to search for alternate sources of energy and begins to break down fat. When fat is broken down (metabolised) into fatty acids, waste products known as ketones (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released from the liver and accumulate in the bloodstream (known as ketonemia). This causes the blood to become too acidic (metabolic acidosis). As well as metabolic acidosis, ketones also cause central nervous depression.The body will try to get rid of the ketones by excreting them out of the body via the urine, increased urine output leads to dehydration, making the problem worse. Meanwhile, the unused glucose remains in the bloodstream, resulting in hyperglycemia (high blood sugar).Insulin Continue reading >>

What To Do If You Have Ketones

What To Do If You Have Ketones

I woke up pretty late today, around 11am. I really didn’t feel like getting up at all because I was still really tired. I was woken up by a ringing house phone that I ignored, then a cell phone with my husband on the other end. Then my mom coming downstairs to get the laundry and reminding me that we were going out today. (I live in my parents basement apartment.) “Ok, Ok… I am getting up” I tell her. I took in a big yawn and stretch of the arms. Then I actually got up out of my bed. I felt weird but I just thought it was because I got out of the bed too quickly. I tried to lick my lips together, but I had no saliva in my mouth - it was like the Mojave desert in there. I went to the bathroom to wash up because now my mom was getting antsy and rushing me. Don’t you just love getting up like that? Anyway, I started to feel a bit nauseated after about 20 minutes. I know these symptoms all too well. Dry mouth, Nausea = High blood sugar or Ketones. So, I checked my blood sugar. 3 2 1 334. Oh boy. Ok, umm… how did this happen? I didn’t really eat anything high carb last night? I went to bed with a pretty decent number and I just changed my infusion set. I don’t feel sick. My pump site isn’t hurting. It really boggled my mind. I felt my heart race a bit and started feeling panicky, and my breathing was getting heavier. Can you say panic attack? I always get a little paranoid though, it’s just my thing. Anyway, I told myself “Ok, Gina just calm down, you know what to do.” So I did my thing. I went back into the bathroom and grabbed my Ketostix to check my urine for Ketones. This is something I do when I have an unexpected high blood sugar with nausea. My urine test came out with Large, the highest level. Ugh. Ketones on the back of the bottle start out w Continue reading >>

Getting To Know Ketones

Getting To Know Ketones

People with diabetes, particularly those with Type 1 diabetes, have been at least vaguely aware of the word ketones for a long time. With the recent resurgence of popular interest in low-carbohydrate diets, however, just about everyone seems to be talking about ketones these days. But does anyone really know what ketones are? Are they a danger to your health (as in diabetic ketoacidosis), or a sign that you have lowered your carbohydrate intake enough to cause weight loss (as some people who follow low-carbohydrate diets believe)? What are ketones? Ketones are end-products of fat metabolism in the body. That is, they are formed when fat is burned for energy by the muscles. Chemically, they are acids known as ketone bodies, and there are three types: beta-hydroxybutyric acid, aceto-acetic acid, and acetone. But you don’t have to be a chemist to understand what role they play in the body. To get to know ketones, it’s helpful to understand how your body burns fuel. A simple analogy is that of an automobile. For a car engine to run, the engine must burn fuel (gasoline), and when the fuel is burned, exhaust (carbon monoxide) is created. The carbon monoxide is the end-product of gasoline combustion. Your body also has an engine that must burn fuel to operate. The engine is muscle, and the fuel is fat, carbohydrate (glucose), and, in certain conditions, protein. When fat is burned, the “exhaust” is ketones, and when glucose is burned, the “exhaust” is lactic acid. Fat is more desirable as a fuel than glucose because there are more calories in a gram of fat (9 calories per gram) than there are in a gram of glucose (4 calories per gram), so you get more energy per gram of fat burned. In a sense, you could call fat a high-test fuel. But there is one catch to burning f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can be life threatening. It most commonly occurs when a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes is first made. It can occur when a person with known Type 1 diabetes becomes unwell or has very high blood glucose levels (BGLs) resulting from a lack of insulin. It can even occur in the presence of normal glucose levels in children and young people with known diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes affecting children and adolescents in Australia. The condition occurs when the body does not have enough insulin (a hormone which helps glucose move from the blood into the cells). Insulin is also responsible for controlling the level of glucose in the blood. Without insulin, glucose levels will build up in the blood. Type 1 diabetes is treated by replacing the body’s missing insulin, with injectable insulin. Some of the signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes include nausea, vomiting and/or abdominal pain, dehydration, deep breathing or breathlessness, extreme drowsiness and/or a fruity odour to the breath. What causes DKA? DKA occurs when there is an accumulation of toxic substances called ketones. Ketones are produced when there is not enough insulin in the body. Glucose cannot enter the cells to provide energy which results in a breakdown of fat as an energy source which then results in ketones being produced. Ketones are a form of pollution in the blood. They make the blood too acidic and this can result in the person becoming seriously unwell very quickly. This condition requires immediate medical management. Managing Type 1 diabetes Everyday illnesses, infection, or missed doses of insulin will nearly always cause a rise in BGLs in someone with Type 1 diabetes. Therefore, at the earliest sign of any form of Continue reading >>

1 Ketones In Urine Summary

1 Ketones In Urine Summary

Ketones in urine, or ketonuria, as the name suggests, is characterized by the presence of ketones or ketone bodies in the urine. Ketones build up in the body when fat cells are burned to produce energy. This can be a dangerous condition if the amount of ketone is very high, particularly in people with diabetes who have high glucose levels. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are metabolized by the body for the generation of energy, which is used for various metabolic and enzymatic processes within the cells. On a priority basis, carbohydrates are always metabolized for the production of energy. This is then followed by the metabolization of fats and proteins. However, in some instances when the body starts generating high proportions of energy by metabolizing fats or fatty acids, a waste product of this activity accumulates in the body, which is called ketone bodies. This is usually associated with a lack of sugar or carbohydrates in the diet. These ketones are known to be eliminated through the kidneys. Hence, doctors usually perform urine tests to identify the presence of excessive ketones in the body. The concentration of ketone bodies in the urine under normal conditions is less than 20mg/dl. However, if this value rises to abnormal levels, it could be indicative of a condition known as ketoacidosis. Some of the common symptoms of ketonuria are: Thirst: The body loses excess fluid during the increased excretion of ketones. This leads to increased thirst. Frequent urination: The body tries to excrete accumulated ketones, which are associated with an increased urge to urinate. Nausea or vomiting: As the body tries to get rid of excess amounts of ketones through urine, it increases the excretion of salts like sodium and potassium. Low levels of sodium and potassium may l Continue reading >>

Copyright © 2012 Universal Nutrition.

Copyright © 2012 Universal Nutrition.

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