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How To Fix Physiological Insulin Resistance

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What is INSULIN RESISTANCE? What does INSULIN RESISTANCE mean? INSULIN RESISTANCE meaning - INSULIN RESISTANCE definition - INSULIN RESISTANCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults. Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose. Insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin action; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance may also develop in patients who have recently experienced abdominal or bariatric procedures. This acute form of insulin resistance that may result post-operatively tends to increase over the short-term with sensitivity to insulin typically returning to patients after about five days.

Physiological Insulin Resistance

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I have been doing a little reading on this subject but I`m still not sure if I have a handle on it or not and would like a little advice please. My understanding is as follows: A lot of t2`s have Pathological insulin resistance so that when we produce glucose our pancreas has to produce insulin but we don`t use it very well which means more insulin which causes weight gain and so on... A low carb diet produces less glucose which calls for less insulin which has to be a good thing presumably. However, carb restriction can also cause Physiological insulin resistance which, if I understand correctly, saves the smaller amount of glucose which is produced for the brain by making the muscles insulin resistant which leads to higher bg readings. Is my understanding anywhere close to correct and will these higher bg levels lead to a higher HBA1C ? Thank you for reading and please reply with your opinions. Chris. Hi, I have been doing a little reading on this subject but I`m still not sure if I have a handle on it or not and would like a little advice please. My unders Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

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THE KETOGENIC EDGE COOKBOOK: A Training Manual for Low-Carb, Ketogenic, and Paleo Cuisine - http://www.primaledgehealth.com/produ... free Maca EBOOK: http://www.primaledgehealth.com/prima... For coaching, skype consultations: http://www.primaledgehealth.com/coach... The length which one may wish to maintain ketosis will differ for everyone - here I present some thoughts on how some people may wish to approach the ketogenic diet depending on their goals, past history, and preferences.

Does Long Term Ketosis Cause Insulin Resistance?

“It’s a snake.” “It’s a wall.” “It’s a rope.” “It’s a fan.” “It’s a tree.” “It’s insulin resistance.” I’ve always been fascinated by those describing a “new finding” in medicine. I am reminded of the story of 5 men who, never having seen an elephant before, were blindfolded and asked to describe what he discovered. However, each man was introduced to a different part of the elephant. Each of them had a dramatically different description of the elephant and each made a conclusion that was very different from the others. What is fascinating, is that we usually make our “blindfolded comparisons” to those things we have seen or about which we have some descriptive understanding. Observing and describing human physiology is much like examining an elephant while blindfolded for the first time. This week’s “blind-folded finding” is what has been interpreted by some as “insulin resistance” made worse by a ketogenic diet. Really? This perked my curiosity, because I’ve personally been following a low-carbohydrate/ketogenic diet for 10 years and have thousands of patients doing the same. To this day, I’ve never seen insulin resistanc Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. hunterxgreen

    I have no interest in being Keto any longer so how long does it take to reverse the physiological insulin resistance?

  2. Dynoman

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sAqy1lnWXo

  3. simsalabimbam

    A couple of days.

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A discussion of the mechanisms of insulin resistance and beta-cell failure, as well as the interaction with diet. Reversal of T2D in the context of caloric restriction, gastric bypass surgery, and plant-based nutrition will be discussed, with emphasis on the benefits of a plant-based diet approach.

Insulin Resistance Is Good? – T2d 7

Everybody says that insulin resistance is bad. Very bad. It’s the root cause of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and metabolic syndrome, isn’t it? So, if it is so bad, why do we all develop it in the first place? What’s the root cause? My friend Dr. Gary Fettke from Tasmania wrote an illuminating book called ‘Inversion’ where he describes how you can learn a lot from looking at things from another perspective. Invert (turn upside down) your perspective, and see how your horizons are immensely broadened. So let’s look at why we develop insulin resistance. Why is it good? Root Cause Analysis What is the root cause of insulin resistance? Some people say inflammation or oxidative stress or free radicals causes insulin resistance. Those are total cop-out answers. Inflammation is the body’s non-specific response to injury. But what causes the injury in the first place? That’s the real problem. The inflammation is only the body’s response to whatever is causing the injury. Think about it this way. Suppose we are battlefield surgeons. After decades on the job, we decide that blood is bad. After all, every time we see blood, bad things are happening. When we don’t see blood, bad t Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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