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How To Avoid Ketoacidosis

What Are The Best New Products Or Inventions That Most People Don't Know About?

What Are The Best New Products Or Inventions That Most People Don't Know About?

This list contains 25 of them. take few minutes and be amazed. 1. Hourglass Traffic Lights 2.Easy-to-pack Shoes 3. Toothpaste Squeezer 4. Fence Window 5. Mirror Wiper 6. Drivemotion LED Car Sign 7. Pizza Scissors 8. Onion Holder 9. Rotating Bench That Guarantees a Dry Place to Sit 10. Faucet Thermometer 11. Citrus Spritzer 12. Ironing Board Mirror 13. Scooter Stroller 14. Lego Key Holder 15. Baby Bath Visor 16. Spaghetti Fork 17. Word Search Wrapping Paper 18. Lockable Mug 19. Umbrella with a Cupholder 20. Laser Bike Lane 21. Ice Cream Lock 22. Meat Scanner 23. Zipper Sneakers 24. Leftover Vegetable/Fruit Seal 25. Nightlight with Portable Glowing Orbs Source: Here Are 25 Incredibly Brilliant Inventions You Didn’t Even Know You Needed. #1 Changes Everything! UPDATE 1 Here are few more but from India this time. These are the finest of examples of what we in India call Jugaad Technology ;) Source:: 10 Pictures That Prove Indians Are One Of The Most Innovative People In The World 1. Probably the best load carrier for manual labour ever created. Vikram Dinubhai Panchal of The National Institute of Design (NID), created this masterpiece and priced it at a miniscule cost of Rs. 300. 2. We charge our mobile phones using Peepal Leaves. Unbelievable? Yes. Does it work? Yes. Astonishingly innovative? Absolutely! 3. We made a Rickshaw Powered-Lighting System. Now this is called "Man-power." Literally. 4. And here's a people carrier that blurs the fine line between mode of transportation and circus act. Although the thing looks a little dicey, you can't help but marvel at the guy's ingenuity. 5. We came up with the "Mitti-Cool" village fridge. Here's a fridge for the common man that doesn't require electricity. Indian inventor Mansukhbhai Prajapati poses with his "Mitti-Cool (Mud Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

How To Avoid Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

It might have been a really long time since you’ve been in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), or maybe you’ve never had it. But if you have Type 1 diabetes, you are at risk. Sometimes when you haven’t recently experienced a situation, you kind of forget about what you were told to do for prevention or treatment. That’s why a refresher might be a great idea! Signs you are experiencing diabetic ketoacidosis: If you are in DKA, it’s likely that you are nauseous or vomiting. Your breath may have a fruity or acetone odor as your body tries to offload ketones through your breathing. It’s likely that you will be dehydrated with very high BG levels and excessive urination. You might have aches and pains, and perhaps blurred vision. Not fun. DKA is serious, and can be life-threatening. Because of dehydration and excessive ketone production, the blood becomes acidic. This is caused by a lack of working insulin. Most cells preferentially burn glucose for fuel. Many cells can also burn fat in small amounts. While glucose burns “cleanly,” fat produces waste products called ketones. Ketones are acid and upset the pH balance, essentially polluting the atmosphere in our bodies. We don’t tend to burn much fat at a time, so small amounts of ketones can usually be broken down and burned off along with glucose. It’s necessary to have enough glucose in the body cells so there is a fuel source, and we also need to have insulin to move the glucose into the cells, where it can be used for energy. If there is no insulin, the glucose can’t get inside the cells. The cells are then forced to burn fat as an energy source, and this causes large amounts of ketones to be produced. Although some ketones will be eliminated through the urine, there will be too many ketones in the bloodstr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

How Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Life?

How Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Life?

The ketogenic diet has changed many people’s lives in different ways: from weight loss to reversing diabetes to improving multiple health factors. Eating a diet high in fat, moderate in protein, and very low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic diet (or commonly known as “keto”), puts your body into a state of ketosis, a natural metabolic state in which your body is no longer using glucose as its main source of fuel, and instead it begins using ketones to get its energy. Ketones are produced when your body is burning fat because no glucose is available. It is important not to confuse ketosis, a completely harmless and normal metabolic state, with ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that occurs mostly in type 1 diabetics when they create high levels of both glucose and ketones at the same time. On the ketogenic plan, blood glucose usually drops, so this is not a danger for most people. However, if you are a type 1 diabetic, check with your doctor before switching to the ketogenic way of eating. So being in ketosis simply means that you have switched from being a sugar-burner to a fat-burner. Ketones are created when you are metabolizing fat, whether it is from the fat in the foods you eat or from the fat around your belly. The ketogenic diet also is an anti-inflammatory way of eating. Chronic inflammation has been shown to be a significant contributor to metabolic syndrome, which includes obesity, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol levels. Keto avoids foods that can cause inflammation, notably grains, sugar, and starchy carbohydrates such as potatoes and rice. Reducing inflammation may also improve leptin function in the body. Leptin is a hormone that sends signals to the brain that you have enough energy stored and that you are satiat Continue reading >>

How To Treat Ketoacidosis

How To Treat Ketoacidosis

Immediately drink a large amount of non-caloric or low caloric fluid. Continue to drink 8 to 12 oz. every 30 minutes. Diluted Gatorade, water with Nu-Salt™ and similar fluids are good because they help restore potassium lost because of high blood sugars. Take larger-than-normal correction boluses every 3 hours until the blood sugar is below 200 mg/dl (11 mmol) and ketones are negative. It will take much more rapid insulin than normal to bring blood sugars down when ketones are present in the urine or blood. Often, one and a half to two times the normal insulin dose for a high blood sugar will be necessary. Higher insulin doses than these will be needed if there is an infection or other major stress. If nausea becomes severe or last 4 hours or more, call your physician. If vomiting starts or you can no longer drink fluids, have a friend or family member call your physician immediately, then go directly to an emergency room for treatment. Never omit your insulin, even if you cannot eat. A reduced insulin dose might be needed, but only if your blood sugar is currently low. When high blood sugars or ketoacidosis happen, it is critical that you drink lots of fluid to prevent dehydration. Take extra amounts of Humalog, Novolog or Regular insulin to bring the blood sugars down. Children with severe ketoacidosis lose 10-15 % of their previous body weight (i.e., a 60 lb. child can lose 6 to 9 lbs. of weight) due to severe dehydration. Replacement of fluids should be monitored carefully. The dehydration is caused by excess urination due to high blood sugars and is quickly worsened when vomiting starts due to the ketoacidosis. The start of vomiting requires immediate attention at an ER or hospital where IV fluid replacement can begin. If only nausea is present and it is possible Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetics Have Diabetic Emergencies? (see Details)

How Can Diabetics Have Diabetic Emergencies? (see Details)

You evidently have no idea what diabetes is, and what complications can occur. Diabetes is much, much more than just a high blood sugar. Roughly speaking, type I diabetes is due to people developing auto-antibodies against their own pancreatic islet beta cells that produce insulin causing insulitis, thus destroying these islets, so after some time there is an absolute lack of insulin, without which no sugar can be metabolized to produce energy in the form of ATP. In the days before insulin was invented they all quickly died, Banting and Best first used a rough pancreas extract to save the life of a 14 yo boy in 1922 see The Discovery of Insulin and were awarded the Nobel Prize for that. It is hard to exactly dose the insulin right, giving too much in relationship to food intake (which will make blood sugar rise) and exertion (which will make blood sugar go down) will cause people to develop such a low blood sugar that the brain, which needs sugar in the form of glucose to function to lose consciousness, a hypoglycemic coma, which if very severe might rarely lead to death, this needs to be treated by giving glucose often by intravenous injection. If too little, blood sugar will rise, with no immediate adverse results, but in the longer term associated with all kinds for terrible complications like serious nerve damage, impotence, occluded arteries in the limbs leading to amputations, heart attacks, stroke, blindness, kidney failure leading to dialysis, etc. etc. If no insulin is taken at all after around 1,5 day no glucose can be metabolized, so blood sugar will rise, be excreted into the urine, taking lots of water with it leading to serious dehydration, acute kidney failure, circulatory shock, because fat metabolism needs insulin keto-acids will form so the body become Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets & Ketoacidosis

Low-carb Diets & Ketoacidosis

Drastically switching up your diet always carries the risk of side effects -- which is why it's important to talk to a doctor first -- but low-carb diets shouldn't cause ketoacidosis. This life-threatening condition, which develops when the blood becomes acidic, is generally only a risk for people with undiagnosed or poorly controlled type-1 diabetes. Low-carb diets actually put you in ketosis, a very mild form of ketoacidosis that does not carry the same life-threatening risk. Video of the Day Low-Carb Diets and Your Metabolism Reducing your carb intake can whittle your waist, and more restrictive low-carb diets speed up weight loss by affecting how your body generates energy. Normally, your body turns to carbs as the primary source of energy for your cells, and several tissues -- like your liver and muscles -- store carbs in the form of glycogen for almost-immediate energy. However, on a low-carb diet you're not getting enough carbs to replenish those glycogen stores, so your body turns to fat. It burns fatty acids -- the fat molecules that help make up your fat tissue -- to create ketone bodies, an alternate source of fuel. Because you're creating more ketone bodies for energy, you're burning more fat -- and losing weight. Low-Carb Diets Cause Dietary Ketosis Diets low enough in carbs to switch your primary fuel source over to ketone bodies are called ketogenic diets, and those that restrict your carb intake to 20 to 25 grams daily are typically low-carb enough to put you into ketosis. In addition to burning fat, ketogenic diets help you lose weight by controlling your appetite. One study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2008, found that men following a ketogenic diet ate less and reported feeling less hungry than dieters following a modera Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Diabetes is amongst the foremost leading cause of deaths in most of the countries. Today, the disease is widespread like an epidemic and the several complications which diabetes leads to often make people wonder #Can you Die from Diabetes?”. Well, although the answer to the above question cannot be a straight “Yes”, there is no denying of the fact that diabetes can, in fact, turn out to be a deadly disease. As per a report circulated by Diabetes UK, the life expectancy of a type 1 diabetes patient can be reduced by 20 years, while the same can be reduced by 10 in the case of a type 1 diabetes patient. This, of course, can be controlled by adopting a healthy lifestyle and controlling your blood sugar levels. Some of the ways in which you can die from diabetes include the following: High Blood Glucose Levels: The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is the inability to keep the blood glucose levels under control. Lipid Disorders: With diabetes comes a host of various other complications such as heart diseases, kidney disorders, amongst others. The leading cause of these complications is the disorder of the lipids in a diabetic patient. Diabetes Ketoacidosis: The high sugar level in the blood which is a characteristic of diabetes often leads to the high amount of ketone cells in the body. These ketones could be extremely deadly, causing deaths in patients. Complications: Diabetes is known to cause several complications in patients which adversely affect the functioning of the heart, kidney, eyes, and even nerves of different body parts. Any of these complications can become serious and lead to the death of the patient. Hence, can you die from diabetes? Well, yes you can. However, with proper care, regular exercise, following a proper diet, and taking timely me Continue reading >>

Why Do We Throw Up When We Are Hung-over?

Why Do We Throw Up When We Are Hung-over?

1. The Body’s Reaction to Toxins An area of the brain, known as the vomiting center, alerts your body at once if any toxic substance enters your system. The vomiting center can be triggered by signals received from different parts of the body, such as the stomach, intestines, the balancing system and the blood stream. Alcohol ingestion is one of the triggers that can result in activation of the vomiting center. If the toxic level of alcohol is reached, the vomiting center will try to expel the excessive alcohol by making you throw up. 2. Gastroparesis Why do you throw up after drinking? Maybe the reason is gastroparesis. Alcohol intake causes the slowdown of the digestion in stomach (gastroparesis), which will lead to delayed stomach emptying. Since the digestion is slow, the proteins remaining in stomach will start to rot. The by-products of rotting are quite toxic and can trigger vomiting. 3. Alcohol Poisoning Alcohol poisoning is a potentially life-threatening result of alcohol drinking. Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol over a short span of time can exert adverse effects on gag reflex respiration, heart rate and body temperature. Coma and even death can occur if prompt treatment is not given. Except from vomiting, the signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning also include delirium, seizures, low breathing rate (less than 8 breathes in a minute), pale or blue skin, cold extremities and fainting. 4. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Why do you throw up after drinking? Alcoholic ketoacidosis may be one of the culprits. The cells need glucose and insulin to function well. Alcohol intake may cause the pancreas to cease the production of insulin. Then cells will start burning fats to obtain energy, which will generate by-products called ketones. Ketones are acidic in nature and Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference paper. Here's a table of the actual numbers to show the differences in magnitude: Body Condition Quantity of Ketones Being Produced After a meal: 0.1 mmol/L Overnight Fast: 0.3 mmol/L Ketogenic Diet (Nutritional ketosis): 1-8 mmol/L >20 Days Fasting: 10 mmol/L Uncontrolled Diabetes (Ketoacidosis): >20 mmol/L Here's a more detailed explanation: Fact 1: Every human body maintains the blood and cellular fluids within a very narrow range between being too acidic (low pH) and too basic (high pH). If the blood pH gets out of the normal range, either too low or too high, big problems happen. Fact 2: The Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is And How To Prevent It

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is And How To Prevent It

What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (say: key-toe-acid-OH-sis), or DKA for short, happens when your body has high blood sugar (also called glucose) and a build-up of acid. If it isn’t treated, it can lead to coma and even death. It mainly affects persons with type 1 diabetes. But, it can happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and diabetes during pregnancy. What causes DKA? The main cause of DKA is not having enough insulin. This raises the blood glucose levels, but stops the body from using the glucose for energy. To get calories, the body starts to burn fat. This causes a build-up of acid in the body. A high level of blood glucose can cause excessive urination, which leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). What are triggering factors? The most common triggering factors are “skipping” insulin doses and illnesses, especially infections that raise your body’s need for insulin. How can I prevent DKA? You should work with your doctor to have a plan if your blood glucose level gets too high. Make sure that you know how to reach your doctor in an emergency. Careful monitoring is needed, especially if you are sick. What should I do? Check your blood glucose level at least every three to four hours if you are sick. Check your glucose level every one to two hours if you have critical blood glucose values. Ask your doctor what your critical level should be. Most patients should watch their glucose levels closely when they are higher than 250 mg per dL. Keep testing at least every four hours during the night. Test your urine for ketones or your blood for beta-hydroxybutyrate every four hours or if your blood glucose is over 250 mg per dL. If you are not eating, do NOT stop your insulin completely. Your body needs insuli Continue reading >>

Is A Ketogenic Diet Effective?

Is A Ketogenic Diet Effective?

The short answer to your question, is yes, a ketogenic diet is safe and effective for most people. Of course, as with any major change in diet or exercise, you should consult with your doctor so that he or she can help you understand whether this diet is safe for YOU. And especially if you are a Type 1 diabetic, I would be concerned about you starting keto without being under close supervision by a doctor because you could go into ketoacidosis which is a dangerous condition. (Ketoacidosis is different than ketosis, which is a safe metabolic condition that your body enters when you cut carbs and raise your fat levels. It’s important not to confuse the two because while ketoacidosis is very dangerous, ketosis is healthy and is actually the goal for most people on the keto diet. Check out this research for the science behind ketosis vs. ketoacidosis.) Basically, a ketogenic diet is very low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. On keto, you should start out eating less than 20 net carbs per day - which is usually what everyone focuses on. But you also need to focus on your protein and fat levels. Women should eat between 50 and 75 grams of protein per day and men should stay between 100–125 grams of protein per day. And then for the fun part of keto - the FAT - your fat should be between a 1:1 and 1:2 ratio of protein to fat. Which means that if I eat 50 grams of protein a day, I should be eating between 50 and 100 grams of fat per day. And this is the yummy kind of fat - saturated fat is great on keto. So eat that bacon and slather on the butter because eating all that fat will help you lose weight and get healthy - as long as you have cut the carbs. And the fat helps you feel full so you won’t get hungry as often and you won’t feel deprived. And don’t worry tha Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

When you’re on a low-carb diet, your body kicks into action, breaking down fats into ketone bodies to use for energy. This increase in ketones -- called ketosis -- is a normal adaptation to cutting carbs. In fact, the switch to ketosis is why low-carb diets work. Even though you could eat enough carbs to prevent ketosis, it's important to clarify why you want to avoid it. There's nothing unhealthy about ketosis, so you may just need to correct any misinformation to make the best decision for your weight-loss goals. Video of the Day Deal With Concerns Over Ketosis Ketosis is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is unfortunate -- ketosis is normal, while ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition related to type 1 diabetes. Most people on a low-carb diet tolerate ketosis without any problems. Then after the pounds are dropped, carb intake is gradually increased so you're out of ketosis by the time you reach the maintenance phase. If you decide to stay in an induction phase longer than the low-carb plan recommends, consult your doctor to be safe. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing ketoacidosis from lack of insulin. Due to the complex metabolism of diabetes, they end up with high levels of blood glucose and ketones, which upsets the body's normal acid-base balance. When that happens, ketosis becomes ketoacidosis, causing symptoms like thirst, frequent urination, dry mouth, nausea, belly pain, rapid breathing and fruity-smelling breath. If you have symptoms, contact your doctor immediately -- diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency. You may be wary about ketosis because you've heard about "ketosis flu." It's not really flu, but in the first few days or weeks of a low-carb diet, some people experience headaches, dizziness, fatigue, constipation or wea Continue reading >>

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