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13 Tips For Losing Weight On A Ketogenic Diet

13 Tips For Losing Weight On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic diets are all the rage these days. Many people think that an all meat diet where you can eat as much as you want sounds appealing. They miss out on the nuances of the diet and don’t quite understand how it works. It’s still important that you watch what you’re putting in your diet to maintain ketosis. It doesn’t stop there, however, as a full lifestyle change is necessary to drastically promote weight loss. Here are 13 ketogenic diet tips for weight loss success. 1. Weigh Your Food Accuracy is important when trying to reach your weight loss goals. Investing a good food scale can really help you monitor your carbohydrate intake with precision. While many may think they can measure by just “eyeballing” servings–the slightest error can have you think you’re consuming an 8 oz. portion though it may really be a 12 oz portion. These errors add up! Avoid the guesswork and use a scale to calculate your food intake. Look for scales that allow you to measure in grams and ounces. There are even scales that connect to apps and websites for even more intuitive food tracking to help you reach your goals. 2. Drink Water Staying hydrated is one of the most important rules of any diet, not just a ketogenic diet. It’s easy to get so wrapped up in our daily routine that we forget how much water we’re taking in throughout the day. While on a ketogenic diet, begin your day by consuming at least 8 to 16 ounces of water. This will allow your body to rehydrate immediately and begin its natural cycles. Throughout the day, you should aim to drink about half of your body weight in ounces. A 150-pound individual should try to drink at least 75 ounces of water during the day. That may seem like a lot but it’s less than 10 cups. When you look at it like that, it doesn Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Weight Loss Plateaus

The Ketogenic Diet And Weight Loss Plateaus

I keep hearing people talk about their weight loss plateaus, and how they can get around them. Some go the extreme route of doing liquid fasting, others will ignore it and keep on keeping on. I wanted to put together a short list of common things that may be wreaking havok on the average ketogenic dieter, and go over some solutions that might help out. Keep in mind, this does not cover everything and it also covers a wide range of topics. As you read this, please read to the end. Don’t form ideas about your own body and apply the things that I am saying with no thought behind it. This is strictly for people that are hitting weight loss plateau’s and need some help. If you have only lost 1 or 2 pounds in a week, that is still weight loss and does not require action against it. Hidden Carbohydrates People on ketogenic diets eat more carbohydrates than they think. They’re hidden in vegetables, nuts, and certain meat products. Yes, that peanut butter you’re chomping on could be causing a problem! Especially if it’s store bought – that stuff is loaded with extra sugar. Some vegetables like Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and squash are common culprits that find their way into our lives on a frequent basis. You might think that they’re low carb, but in large consumption, those carbs really do add up. You can look at the list of the best low carb vegetables we’ve put together, so that you can be more aware of the vegetables you eat. Meat is the center of most of our lives, and there’s sugar everywhere you look. Some bacon is honey smoked, adding unnecessary carbs to an already delicious product. Why the madness? Look for bacon with no sugar added. When you start to look into Italian sausages, chorizo, and canned meats, there’s more carbs than most think. Some b Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Weight Loss Rate – How Fast Can You Lose Weight?

Keto Diet Weight Loss Rate – How Fast Can You Lose Weight?

“I have to lose extra weight fast, urgently, right here and right now. I can not wait a minute, otherwise I cannot wear my favorite clothes to a party, wedding, concert etc.” You are familiar with those thoughts, aren’t you? We always wait until the last day, and then we begin to panic and search for a diet for rapid weight loss. You try to water or juice fast, lose 3-5 kg (6.6 – 11 lb) of nothing but water weight and despite what the scales say, you look no different and feel weak and dehydrated. The keto diet is the safest way to lose weight very fast, but just what is the keto diet weight loss rate? Read on to find out. What is the keto diet weight loss rate? I’m sure there are only ketogenic diet followers among my readers. Well, I’m almost sure of that. Some of you have just entered our low-carb club, and you are really wondering – what is the keto diet weight loss rate? After all, you could be in the category of those who need to fit into a sexy dress just next week. Keep track of your progress! Weight loss is easier when you’re collecting analytic data on yourself! Add to cart Select options Select options Add to cart So, let’s find out what is the weight loss rate on a ketogenic diet. First of all we have to figure out how exactly how our calories get burned with a keto diet. The principle of calorie burning is very simple, although to be honest, I do not agree with it. As for me it is complicated. I think everything is very difficult with our bodies. I will explain it with simple words, without bothering your brain with any detailed information. You are definitely in a rush to start doing whatever needs to be done to fit into the same dress. When you live your usual life without any diet your body gets energy from carbohydrates. As soon as you Continue reading >>

Keto Tip: 5 Reasons You Need To Drink More Water On A Ketogenic Diet!

Keto Tip: 5 Reasons You Need To Drink More Water On A Ketogenic Diet!

It’s often been said that most problems you run in to on a ketogenic diet can be solved by doing one of three things; drink more water, eat more salt, or eat more fat. Over the years as I’ve done this, I’ve found this adage to be fairly accurate as most of the “tweaks” I’ve done to get over a plateau or speed up my weight loss has been some variation of these 3 things. Probably the most powerful part of that truth is to drink more water. I’ve seen over and over again how upping my water intake leads to faster weight loss and a healthier overall feeling as I continue on this little weight loss journey of mine. Here are 5 reasons you should be drinking more water on a Ketogenic Diet Replaces Lost Water This is something I just didn’t know when I started cutting out the carbs and wasn’t prepared to deal with in those early days. Your body stores glycogen in water in your muscles. As your body burns through that stored glycogen and you don’t replace it because you aren’t eating carbs, your body’s water stores get depleted as well. This is why you tend to lose up to 10 lbs in the first week on keto and also what causes the “keto flu” or the miserable feeling that happens just before you switch over to being fat adapted. That feeling is caused by mild dehydration and can be shorten tremendously just by drinking more water. Like I said, that would have been awesome to know in those early days. Suppresses Appetite and Curbs Cravings This is another one of those things that I really wish I had known early on but every time you have a hunger pang or a sugar craving, just drink some water and they go away fairly quickly. In fact, even though I’m almost 2 years into this journey of mine, it is still the ever present glass of water on my computer desk t Continue reading >>

Guide To A 10 Day Water Fast & My Fast Experience

Guide To A 10 Day Water Fast & My Fast Experience

You can read about my previous 5 day water fast experience here. Only drinking water with no food at all for 10 days sounds crazy at first thought. I thought the same. However, upon further research and experimentation, I found that it is incredibly beneficial both physically and mentally. Let’s get a few common questions out of the way to start. What is a water fast? A water fast is where you don’t eat and only drink water for a set period of time. Most humans can survive 40+ days without food, and virtually everyone can go two weeks without food with no problems. Why do a waster fast? Water fasting has many great health benefits (see ‘Benefits’ below). In short, it improves the respiration of your cells which makes them function more effectively, it greatly strengthens your immune system, removes toxins from you body (detox), starves potential cancerous cells, shown to increase longevity and helps repair chronic injuries as well as gut issues. There are few downsides other than the discomfort you have at first and the short time spent not enjoying food. An extended fast can greatly improve the quality of your life and improve how your body functions, as well as change your outlook on food in general. Will I lose muscle? A little bit, depending on how you fast. Most muscle loss happens within the first 3-4 days of the water fast. Once in ketosis (where your body produces ketones for energy rather than glucose (blood sugar)), your body goes into protein sparing mode and you lose very minimal muscle. How much weight will I lose? While I wouldn’t recommend fasting to lose weight, you will lose a fair bit. During my 5 day fast, I lost 5kg (11 lbs) in 5 days. During my 10 day fast, I lost nearly 6kg (13.2 lbs), most in the first 5 days. The vast majority is water Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should I Drink Per Day To Lose Weight?

How Much Water Should I Drink Per Day To Lose Weight?

If you’re on a weight loss program, say like the GM diet or any other diet for that matter, you’ll need to consume enough water everyday as it helps in flushing out harmful toxins from your body, thus maximizing the weight loss results. But, many dieters get confused about the amount of water they should drink per day to lose weight. Well, in this article, let us discuss the logic behind drinking water for weight loss and the number of liters should a person drink on an average per day. 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com Related: Where does fat go after weight loss? or How many calories needed per day? Does Drinking Water Help in Losing Weight? It is a well-known fact that out of the overall human body weight, almost 66% of it is water. Consuming enough quantity of water per day helps in flushing out the impurities out of the body, thus letting you lose the water weight too. Drinking water 30 minutes before any meal helps you eat less. However, it is advised not to drink water beyond the recommended level (too much) as it causes an imbalance in the salt content of your body. Even the potassium levels get disturbed, thereby leading to nausea, fatigue, vomiting and headache. So, what is the ideal amount of water to drink a day to get rid of excess weight? Read to find out. How Many Liters of Water Should You Drink per Day to Lose Weight? The diet experts always recommend the 8 x 8 rule i.e., 8 glasses of 8 ounces water should be drunk by an average individual, which equals 2 liters of water. However, as per the researchers, it is said that we should drink 4 litres of water every day for best results. Of-course, the main reason why they suggest this number is because of the several factors that are to be consid Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

One of the most frequently asked questions by people encountering a Zero Carb diet for the first time, especially if they come from a low carb, ketogenic diet background, is… Do I need to be concerned about or measure my level of ketones? I think one of the main reasons this happens is because the descriptive label most often applied to this way of eating is Zero Carb, rather than Zero Plant Foods, All-Meat, or Carnivore (labels which are actually far more descriptively accurate). Additionally, this way of eating probably attracts more people from the low carb community than from any other dietary background. The question comes up often enough that I felt it might be helpful to collect some of the best responses offered by long term Zero Carb practitioners and put them into one place for easy reference. Basically, as you will see from the quotes below, there is no need to measure blood, breath, or urine ketone levels while eating an All-Meat diet in order to experience the benefits that this way of eating offers. ….. Rose Nunez Smith: I’ve been ZC nearly six years. A couple years ago I got scared about cancer (I’m adopted and discovered a long list of direct maternal relatives who died of cancer), so I bought a blood ketone meter, what with all the exciting research starting to happen around ketosis and cancer. When I’d been VLC eight years ago, I turned the ketostix purple consistently, so I figured I’d get a pretty good reading on a blood meter. I couldn’t get above trace. My diet for years had been meat, egg yolks, butter and lard for cooking, water, coffee. That’s it. I began cutting meat and adding more butter. The number nudged up. I cut out beef entirely, eating chicken, pork and fish, and added coconut oil to my coffee. A little more nudge. I ski Continue reading >>

Never Thirsty On Keto Diet, Should I Be Drinking Lots Of Water Anyway?

Never Thirsty On Keto Diet, Should I Be Drinking Lots Of Water Anyway?

When I'm consuming lots of fat I'm never thirsty. I do get some liquid from bone broth that I use as a soup base for many of my meals but I rarely just drink water. I've read on the web that one should drink lots of water on a ketogenic diet to flush out all those ketones. Can someone provide a credible reference to whether drinking lots of water is a really good idea or not? (There's too much personal opinion on the subject hence the desire for something more scientific.) If it matters, I typically eat 5 to 10 ounces of protein a day, so not a huge amount. Update 12/29/13: Oops. I meant EIGHT to 10 ounces a day of protein. That should be 50 to 60 grams of protein. And, I'll probably start adding 3 or 4 eggs. The whites should be good for 20 or so more grams of protein, Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq

Ketogenic Diet Faq

With all the new people finding, switching, and transitioning into a low carb diet, I figured it was about time I put together an FAQ on all the common questions that are asked when someone is starting out. I don’t go too in depth in the answers, but I tried to give a direct answer and then link to a more in depth article on the topic to help you fully understand it. If you have any other questions you’d like to be added, changed, or are unsure about – please feel free to leave a comment below so I can fully explain, or make changes to the answers on this page. Best wishes, and to all the new people out there – good luck and happy dieting! Frequently Asked Questions Click any of the questions below and it will take you to the answer. How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis? A ketogenic diet is not a diet that you can whimfully choose to go on and off of at any point. It takes time for your body to adjust and go into a state known as ketosis. This process? Anywhere from 2 – 7 days, depending on your body type, activity levels, and what you’re eating. The fastest way to get into ketosis is to exercise on an empty stomach, restrict your carbohydrate intake to 20g or less per day, and be vigilant with your water intake. To improve the rate at which you enter ketosis, there is a method called Fat Fasting. I’ve written an article on Fat Fasting on a Ketogenic Diet and everything involved with it. Make sure that if you use this method, it is only for a few days, otherwise it can bring harm to you. Where Can I Find Low Carb Recipes? Everywhere on the internet! There’s recipes on almost every health website nowadays, and a quick Google of what you want will definitely help you out. You can even convert high carb recipes that use sugar or fruits in them to low c Continue reading >>

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). I personally recommend a cyclic ketogenic diet for most of my clients where you go low-carb for 3 days and then have a slightly higher carbohydrate day, followed by 3 lower carb days. This cycles the body in and out of a state of ketosis and is beneficial for hormone balance while keeping inflammatory levels very low. The biggest challenge with this nutrition plan is to get into and maintain the state of fat adaption. Here are several advanced tips to get into and maintain ketosis. 1. Stay Hydrated: This is considered a no-brainer, but is not easy to follow. We often get so busy in our day-day lives that we forget to hydrate effectively. I recommend super hydrating your system by drinking 32 oz of filtered water within the first hour of waking and another 32-48 oz of water before noon. I have most of my clients do a water fast or eat light in the morning doing smoothies or keto coffee or tea. So hydration around these dishes should be well tolerated by the digestive system. In general, aiming to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water and closer to your full body weight in ounces of water daily will help you immensely. I weigh 160 lbs and easily drink 140-180 ounces of water each day. Sometimes more in the summer time. As you begin super Continue reading >>

Losing Water Weight: How Carbs Really Work

Losing Water Weight: How Carbs Really Work

Does going on a ketogenic diet mean you have to stay on it forever? Why do many folks experience a few days of low-energy moodiness (“low carb flu”) at the beginning of ketogenic diets? The answer to all of these queries can be found in understanding our body’s relationship with glycogen. Many people ask if is glycogen a carbohydrate. Glycogen is the way the body processes and stores glucose as energy, chiefly in the liver and the muscles. High intensity activities like sprinting draw upon the glycogen tucked away in our muscles for fuel, which is why you hear about marathoners “carb-loading” in the days before a big race. The glycogen stored in the liver is what keeps specific systems running all day, including the brain, kidney cells, and red blood cells. For anyone not low-carbing, the body needs a minimum of 100g of glucose each day in order to meet the basic demands of the brain. So — what if a person consumes significantly less than 100g of carbohydrates in a day? What happens when the body runs out of glycogen stores? The hierarchy of energy sources Your body’s just as lazy as you are on Sunday afternoon eating chips on the couch, and it will get energy from the easiest sources possible as long as they’re available. The zippiest energy comes from carbohydrates in the diet, especially simple carbs quickly converted into sugars (think white bread, sweets, fructose, etc.), with more complex carbs following shortly after. For a person following SAD (Standard American Diet) — we’re talking easily over 300g carbohydrates a day on average — the body may not ever burn through this ingested potential energy. Instead, it simply sweeps it away under the rug — you know, the one bulging around your waist — where no one will ever notice. When you cut Continue reading >>

5 Newbie Mistakes On Keto

5 Newbie Mistakes On Keto

First and foremost, Happy New Year to all of the new low-carb, gluten-free, keto-ers! As you can tell , I haven’t posted at all last month. To be honest, I made a huge flopping fail during the month of December. I guess I just wanted to celebrate my birthday the entire month! I’m now officially 24 (cue mid-twenties crisis) and I’m ready to jump back on the keto bandwagon. Since it is the New Year, I thought I’d share with you the easy mistakes on keto that I made when first starting. That way, you won’t make the same ones that I did. 1. Eating low-fat foods Yeah. Don’t do it. I know that we’ve been told to avoid fat since we were children, but the time has come to smash that rule. Eat full fat cheese. Eat that skin off of your chicken. Drown your broccoli in butter. Yes, all of it. The only fats I would look into avoiding are vegetable oils like canola and corn. These oils don’t help the body’s inflammation at all when there are so many other, tastier options (like bacon grease, butter and coconut oil). 2. Not replacing electrolytes On keto, you must drink a lot of water since it is dispelled so quickly. When this happens, electrolytes are excreted through your urine and it’s VERY important to replenish them. Use coconut water, low-sugar gatorade or my favorite – bone broth. Using these will also significantly help with the keto flu. 3. Too many changes at once This one is very important. Remember, you are a human. Changing from a lifestyle of processed junk and no exercise to a completely keto and active lifestyle are opposite ends of the extremes. Choose one or the other to focus on first. You don’t want to get burnt out in such a small amount of time. 4. Not giving fat adaption the time it takes The first week will most likely leave you feelin Continue reading >>

The Role Of Salt In A Ketogenic-diet. ‘keto-flu’ Explained!

The Role Of Salt In A Ketogenic-diet. ‘keto-flu’ Explained!

I was keen to understand why all the low-carb diet resources tell you to eat more salt. I therefore decided to look into this in greater detail. The problem I encountered was that nothing actually states the reasoning behind it; sources merely allude to the requirements, then make recommendations on how to achieve them. What I was keen to understand in particular, is the role of insulin in causing the kidneys to retain salt. The below is what I’ve managed to piece together. As always, I must state that I have no medical or dietary training; all I can do is try and present the results of my own reading in as clear and jargon-free way as possible. If readers’ comments can help guide my understanding, then all feedback will be gratefully received! So here goes… Salt! When you switch over to a ketogenic diet, you’re effectively changing the way your body creates and burns energy. On a glucose-based metabolism, the energy-form ‘glycogen’ is produced in the liver. This energy is water-soluble and transported around the body in your blood. The blood-stream is therefore our ‘road-network’ for distributing energy to all the cells and muscles that need it. Glycogen is also stored in the muscles, so the blood-motorway serves to ‘top up’ these stores when required. Because glycogen is transported in liquid & is water-soluble; it’s unsurprising that glycogen itself contains a lot of water. In fact, it’s stored in liquid form; three to four parts water to one part glycogen (sources state 3-4g water to 1g glycogen). When you restrict carbohydrate, you stop consuming glucose, the raw-material from which glycogen is made (see Fuel versus Energy for more details). Your stores of glycogen therefore deplete as your body burns energy, and because glycogen carries 3-4 Continue reading >>

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

One of the well-known mantras of the ketogenic diet is very low carb intake and high fat intake. But there’s another nutrient that’s important to monitor when going keto—and a lot of people make the mistake of not considering its importance. That would be protein. Although protein is a critical element in the diet we need for optimal health, it’s important to not eat TOO much protein on the ketogenic diet. Why? Well, there are a couple reasons that we’ll be discussing below. How Too Much Protein is Bad for Ketosis The biggest energy source on the ketogenic diet is fat. In fact, around 75% of your diet should come from healthy fat sources. The key here is that, unlike the traditional idea of low-carb diets where protein is higher, protein intake should bemoderate, not high, on keto. Not following this advice will never allow your body to enter ketosis, which is the main point of going keto and reaping all of the amazing benefits. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is because our bodies have a fundamental energy process called gluconeogenesis. For a deeper dive into the topic, see our post on fixing the biggest ketosis mistakes. For now we shoud know the basics. Let’s break it down this mouthful of a term. The word gluconeogenesis has three parts to it, Gluco – coming from the greek root glukos – literally meaning “sweet wine.” Neo – “new” Genesis – “creation” So a great way to think about it is this is how your body creates new sweet wine for your body. Some people tout that “you don’t need carbohydrates to survive,” which is only partially true. To clarify, you don’t need to eat any carbs to survive, but make no mistake, your body needs carbs in the form of glucose and glycogen, and it will get this via survival mechan Continue reading >>

Ketosis Weight Loss Rules

Ketosis Weight Loss Rules

Ketogenic dieting is a controversial weight loss method, popularized by Dr. Robert Atkins. During a ketogenic diet, carbohydrates are severely restricted and replaced with high amounts of fat and protein. With no carbohydrates, the body shifts into ketosis, a form of fat metabolism. The theory behind the diet is that despite high amounts of dietary fat, weight loss is accelerated because insulin production is reduced, limiting your body’s ability to store body fat. If you are considering a ketosis diet, there are some important rules to follow. Video of the Day Before you even attempt a ketosis diet, get a full checkup, including blood work. Ketosis diets require a high intake of saturated fats, which may have an adverse effect on your cholesterol. Stay under the supervision of your doctor throughout the diet so you're alerted to any negative changes. Carbohydrates, in the form of glycogen, are stored with water, keeping you hydrated. When you restrict carbohydrates, your body quickly sheds water weight. While most dieters are encouraged by this reduction in body weight, remember that you are now more vulnerable to dehydration. Harvard Medical School recommends drinking at least 6 to 8 cups of liquid per day. Be especially diligent with water intake when working out and in hot weather and drink two to three cups of water for every hour of exercise or vigorous activity. The Harvard School of Public Health recommends women consume at least 20 grams of fiber per day, while men need over 30. When you eliminate carbs from your diet, you may unintentionally reduce your intake of fiber. Throughout the diet, maintain your consumption of vegetables, which are low in carbs but high in fiber. You may also need to take a dietary supplement containing psyllium husk. Getting plenty Continue reading >>

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