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Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

Keto Tip: 5 Reasons You Need To Drink More Water On A Ketogenic Diet!

Keto Tip: 5 Reasons You Need To Drink More Water On A Ketogenic Diet!

It’s often been said that most problems you run in to on a ketogenic diet can be solved by doing one of three things; drink more water, eat more salt, or eat more fat. Over the years as I’ve done this, I’ve found this adage to be fairly accurate as most of the “tweaks” I’ve done to get over a plateau or speed up my weight loss has been some variation of these 3 things. Probably the most powerful part of that truth is to drink more water. I’ve seen over and over again how upping my water intake leads to faster weight loss and a healthier overall feeling as I continue on this little weight loss journey of mine. Here are 5 reasons you should be drinking more water on a Ketogenic Diet Replaces Lost Water This is something I just didn’t know when I started cutting out the carbs and wasn’t prepared to deal with in those early days. Your body stores glycogen in water in your muscles. As your body burns through that stored glycogen and you don’t replace it because you aren’t eating carbs, your body’s water stores get depleted as well. This is why you tend to lose up to 10 lbs in the first week on keto and also what causes the “keto flu” or the miserable feeling that happens just before you switch over to being fat adapted. That feeling is caused by mild dehydration and can be shorten tremendously just by drinking more water. Like I said, that would have been awesome to know in those early days. Suppresses Appetite and Curbs Cravings This is another one of those things that I really wish I had known early on but every time you have a hunger pang or a sugar craving, just drink some water and they go away fairly quickly. In fact, even though I’m almost 2 years into this journey of mine, it is still the ever present glass of water on my computer desk t Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Ratio, Calories And Fluids: Do They Matter?

Ketogenic Ratio, Calories And Fluids: Do They Matter?

Go to: Ketogenic Ratio The ketogenic ratio is defined as the ratio of grams of fat to grams of carbohydrate plus protein. Higher ratios result in greater degrees of ketosis. Traditionally, the KD has been calculated based on specific ratios, based on patient age. Infants and teens were generally started on a 3:1 ratio and other children on a 4:1 ratio. The dietary ratio was adjusted to maintain urinary ketones in the moderate to high range (80-160 mg/dL). While higher ratios may confer better seizure control, they may also result in poorer tolerability of the diet (Nylen et al. 2005). A survey of worldwide use of the KD has shown that centers in India and Asia use lower ratios with good success (Kossoff and McGrogan JR, 2005). Furthermore, “newer” variations of the diet, such as the modified Atkins diet and the low glycemic index diet have significantly lower ratios, yet similar efficacy to the traditional diet (Kossoff et al. 2003, Pfeifer and Thiele, 2005). Studies have evaluated the association between higher ketogenic ratios and improved seizure control. In animals, higher ratios correlate with greater efficacy. Bough fed groups of rats KDs with ratios varying from 1:1 to 9:1 (Bough et al. 2000). All diets were calorie-restricted to approximately 90% of the normal daily requirement. Animals were maintained on the diet from P37 to P57-58, when testing to determine seizure susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures was performed. Weight gain and degree of ketosis was assessed for each group. Higher ratios correlated significantly with poorer weight gain and higher mean B-hydroxybutyrate levels (p<0.05 for both). The efficacy was significantly greater for animals fed diets exceeding a 6:1 ratio, compared to those fed 4:1 or 5:1 ratios (p=0.009 and Continue reading >>

Your Macros

Your Macros

Most people aim for a specific goal on a ketogenic diet. We aim to make sure the results of the calculator are accurate and can be used by anyone. Our keto calculator uses the Mifflin-St.Jeor Formula which was the most accurate (versus the Katch-McCardle Formula or the Harris-Benedict Formula) in a few studies. In this formula, the gender, height, weight, and age are needed to calculate the number of calories to consume. Our keto calculator uses body fat percentage to calculate your lean body mass. Using this number, we’re able to calculate how much protein you need to sufficiently lose weight without losing excess muscle. Eating too little or too much protein on a ketogenic diet (or any diet) can lead to dangerous or unwanted results. DEXA scans are proven to be the most accurate measurement of body fat. They’re commonly available at gyms and some doctor offices when requested. If you don’t have access to this, you can always go the old-fashioned route and use a good quality caliper. The last resort is using a guide to visually estimate – this can sometimes be a little bit inaccurate, so try to over estimate your body fat percentage. This will give us an idea of how much the minimum amount of calories your body will burn in a day. Our keto calculator uses this to calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). We use this number, along with your body fat percentage, to estimate how many calories you’ll need for your goals. The BMR is simply a number of calories we burn while our bodies are at rest and from eating and digesting food. Together they form what’s known as TDEE, or total daily energy expenditure. This is the keto calculator’s estimate for your total calories burned per day. If you use a heart rate monitor or third party software to monitor your calo Continue reading >>

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

A few months ago, I read a book called The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Living. The authors are two of the world's leading researchers on low-carb diets. Dr. Jeff S. Volek is a Registered Dietitian and Dr. Stephen D. Phinney is a medical doctor. These guys have performed many studies and have treated thousands of patients with a low-carb diet. According to them, there are many stumbling blocks that people tend to run into, which can lead to adverse effects and suboptimal results. To get into full-blown ketosis and reap all the metabolic benefits of low-carb, merely cutting back on the carbs isn't enough. If you haven't gotten the results you expected on a low-carb diet, then perhaps you were doing one of these 5 common mistakes. There is no clear definition of exactly what constitutes a "low carb diet." Some would call anything under 100-150 grams per day low-carb, which is definitely a lot less than the standard Western diet. A lot of people could get awesome results within this carbohydrate range, as long as they ate real, unprocessed foods. But if you want to get into ketosis, with plenty of ketoness flooding your bloodstream to supply your brain with an efficient source of energy, then this level of intake may be excessive. It could take some self experimentation to figure out your optimal range as this depends on a lot of things, but most people will need to go under 50 grams per day to get into full-blown ketosis. This doesn't leave you with many carb options except vegetables and small amounts of berries. If you want to get into ketosis and reap the full metabolic benefits of low-carb, going under 50 grams of carbs per day may be required. Protein is a very important macronutrient, which most people aren't getting enough of. It can improve satiety and incr Continue reading >>

Your 3 Day Keto Kickstart And Menu Plan

Your 3 Day Keto Kickstart And Menu Plan

So I’m writing this post today as much for me as I am for you. As some of you know, I’ve been doing the low carb and gluten free thing for 2 years now, with great success. Over the Summer though, I got a little lax and the weight started creeping on. I got serious for a bit, then lax again, then serious, then lax, etc. Since then I’ve been gaining and losing the same 12 pounds for about 6 months – a cycle I really, really need to break. In the last couple of months the situation has reached Defcon levels, because the 12 pounds has grown to about 18. This is UNACCEPTABLE, people!!! I need to start walking the walk, not just talking the talk! So I’m buckling down, getting serious, and hitting the Keto HARD from now on. I’m guessing many of you are in a similar situation, since blog traffic has about doubled since January 1st! So I thought I’d share some of my tips for getting into ketosis in three days or less. Then we can rock the low carb thing together and lose the weight for good! Some of you may be new to low carb eating, and whether you are following Atkins, Keto, or another low carb plan, there are a few basic things you should know. The following are some things that I’ve found to be true by my own experience with low carb/keto dieting: The IBIH Keys to Success on Keto… 1. Eat less than 20g net carbs per day if you want to get into ketosis. Net carbs are calculated by subtracting the fiber grams (or sugar alcohols in some cases) from the total carb grams. Don’t guess – you’d be surprised how many grams of carbs there are in things you might have considered “free” like onions, garlic, tomatoes, and kale, just to name a few. 2. Purchase some ketostix – they aren’t expensive and you can even cut them in half to get double the strips. S Continue reading >>

5 Days Of Egg Fast | My Sweet Keto

5 Days Of Egg Fast | My Sweet Keto

A lot of people, especially those on LCHF and keto diets , do 5 Days ofEgg Fast to break their weightloss stall. Surprisingly, it works for a majorityof them if we are to believewhat they report on social networks and forums. I havent been able to find any real scientific explanation to why it works but have my thoughts (that might change in the future if I get more clues). Basically, on an Egg Fast, you only eat eggs , healthy fats, and full-fat cheese for 3 to 5 days in a row. You are supposed to eat at least 6 eggs a day, and 1 Tbsp of fat for each egg consumed. The number of ouncesof cheese eatenshould not exceed the number of eggs eaten on each day. If you follow these simple guidelines, you get macronutrients nicely balanced outat the end of the day: Extremelylow carb, high fat, and moderate protein. Thats what the keto diet is all about, except that on Egg Fast, theres practically no fiber intake (no greens, seeds, meals, etc.). Because of this, in my personal opinion, thediet should be kept short-term. Additionally, I think magnesium , potassium , and vitamin supplements should be taken daily. And plenty of water drunk (10 cupsa day, at least).But I am no doctor, so take my advice as an opinion. So, why does the diet work? I think, most of all, one gets rid of plenty of water on Egg Fast. But peoplekeep reporting successful weight loss or weight maintenance for a prolongedperiod, following the fast.So, it is possible theres some hormonal stuff going on in the background, which influences bodys metabolism. Or the other way around. Anyhow, Ill be quite glad once I get to read some research on this (if ever). In case you havent been familiar with Egg Fast, Im listing the rules that one should supposedlyfollow on the diet if they want to break their stall: One has Continue reading >>

Daily Protein Requirement

Daily Protein Requirement

Your daily protein requirement is affected by several factors: Activity level: the more active you are, the more protein you can eat. This is especially true of resistance type exercise such as weight lifting. Essential protein intake: Nine of the 20 required amino acids (the molecular building blocks which make up proteins) are essential, meaning the body cannot make them so they must be obtained from the food we eat. Your gender and basic build: In general, men need more protein than women, and more muscular people also require more protein to maintain lean body mass. The official recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein intake is set at .36 grams per pound of body weight each day. This figure represents the minimum intake needed to maintain health. The protein requirements for those who are looking to optimize health, who are sick, injured or on a very low carb diet may be different. It’s also important to know that a daily protein requirement should never be based on percentage of calories. A person's protein requirements are constant no matter how many calories he or she eats each day because the amount of protein needed is a function of a person’s lean body mass (LBM) or on total ideal body weight if LBM is not known. Calculating protein needs should be based on maintaining positive nitrogen balance. Amino acids contain nitrogen. The protein we eat gets metabolized into amino acids for use in building new muscle and other tissues. Excess nitrogen is excreted via the urine. When the amount of nitrogen excreted is less than the amount of nitrogen in the food we ate, we can say that we are in positive nitrogen balance and it means we took in enough protein to build new tissues. If we don’t eat enough protein, then we get into a negative nitrogen balance. W Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Beginner's Guide To Keto And Weight Loss

Ketogenic Diet: Beginner's Guide To Keto And Weight Loss

The ketogenic diet is a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet which puts the body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. When you're body is in a state of ketosis, the liver produced ketones which become the main energy source for the body. The ketogenic diet is also referred to as keto (key-toe) diet, low carb diet, and low carb high fat (LCHF). So why is it so awesome and why is it taking the world by storm? Because it completely reverses how your body functions (in a good way) along with changing how you view nutrition. It's based around the premise that your body was designed to run more efficiently as a fat burner than a sugar burner. Fat Burner vs Sugar Burner When you eat something that is high in carbs (that yummy donut), your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that is why it's the preferred energy source for your body. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by transporting it around your body. This sounds pretty efficient, right? The problem with this is that when glucose is used as a primary energy source, fats are not needed for energy and therefore are stored. With the average person's diet, glucose is the main energy source. This initially doesn't seem like a problem until you realize that the body can't store that much glucose. This becomes an issue for you because the extra glucose gets converted into fat which is then stored. Because your body uses glucose as it's main energy source the glucose that is converted into fat doesn't get used. When your body runs out of glucose it tells your brain you need more so you end up reaching for a quick snack like a candy bar or some chips. You can begin to see how this cycle leads to building up a body Continue reading >>

Water, Water, Everywhere…

Water, Water, Everywhere…

Water. It’s the source of all life. Around 71% of the earth’s surface is covered with it. There is water vapor in the air around us. The human body is made up of somewhere between 50 and 75% water, depending on individual size and age. Water is truly one of the most important chemical compounds in existence. We need it not just to live, but in order for the species to even exist at all. There are a heck of a lot of dietary myths that have been dispelled or discussed on this site, but one big question that probably needs a bit of a glance is thus: How much water do we actually need to consume to be healthy? Every health and diet “guru” has an opinion on water consumption, and in general the most common opinion is that more is better. I’ve read or seen recommendations ranging from a gallon a day all the way to advice like drink until your urine has no color. And when it comes to keto, things get even murkier. Keto websites and amateur experts throw out all kinds of recommendations, for example: 100 fl oz a day, minimum, or; 2 gallons a day and supplement like crazy, or; drink until you can’t stand it anymore, and then have another glass. Yes, I’ve seriously seen that last one, and no, I will not be naming the culprit. Medical experts vary a bit in their recommendations. For example, the Mayo Clinic’s recommendations vary quite a lot depending on your own circumstances (are you pregnant, do you live in an extremely hot climate, or are you extremely physically active?), although they do mention the standard 8×8 line, as in 8 glasses of 8 fluid ounces a day. We’ve all heard that one. The U. S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates that the average person needs between 91 and 125 fluid ounces of water per day. When factoring in that an estimated 20% Continue reading >>

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

162 Comments Good morning, folks. With next week’s The Keto Reset Diet release, I’ve got keto on the mind today—unsurprisingly. I’ve had a lot of questions lately on duration. As I’ve mentioned before, a good six weeks of ketosis puts in place all the metabolic machinery for lasting adaptation (those extra mitochondria don’t evaporate if/when you return to traditional Primal eating). But what about the other end of the issue? How long is too long? I don’t do this often, but today I’m reposting an article from a couple of years ago on this very topic. I’ve added a few thoughts based on my recent experience. See what you think, and be sure to share any lingering questions on the question of keto timing and process. I’ll be happy to answer them in upcoming posts and Dear Mark columns. Every day I get links to interesting papers. It’s hard not to when thousands of new studies are published every day and thousands of readers deliver the best ones to my inbox. And while I enjoy thumbing through the links simply for curiosity’s sake, they can also seed new ideas that lead to research rabbit holes and full-fledged posts. It’s probably the favorite part of my day: research and synthesis and the gestation of future blogs. The hard part is collecting, collating, and then transcribing the ideas swirling around inside my brain into readable prose and hopefully getting an article out of it that I can share with you. A while back I briefly mentioned a paper concerning a ketone metabolite known as beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and its ability to block the activity of a set of inflammatory genes. This particular set of genes, known as the NLRP3 inflammasome, has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and age-related macular d Continue reading >>

13 Tips For Losing Weight On A Ketogenic Diet

13 Tips For Losing Weight On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic diets are all the rage these days. Many people think that an all meat diet where you can eat as much as you want sounds appealing. They miss out on the nuances of the diet and don’t quite understand how it works. It’s still important that you watch what you’re putting in your diet to maintain ketosis. It doesn’t stop there, however, as a full lifestyle change is necessary to drastically promote weight loss. Here are 13 ketogenic diet tips for weight loss success. 1. Weigh Your Food Accuracy is important when trying to reach your weight loss goals. Investing a good food scale can really help you monitor your carbohydrate intake with precision. While many may think they can measure by just “eyeballing” servings–the slightest error can have you think you’re consuming an 8 oz. portion though it may really be a 12 oz portion. These errors add up! Avoid the guesswork and use a scale to calculate your food intake. Look for scales that allow you to measure in grams and ounces. There are even scales that connect to apps and websites for even more intuitive food tracking to help you reach your goals. 2. Drink Water Staying hydrated is one of the most important rules of any diet, not just a ketogenic diet. It’s easy to get so wrapped up in our daily routine that we forget how much water we’re taking in throughout the day. While on a ketogenic diet, begin your day by consuming at least 8 to 16 ounces of water. This will allow your body to rehydrate immediately and begin its natural cycles. Throughout the day, you should aim to drink about half of your body weight in ounces. A 150-pound individual should try to drink at least 75 ounces of water during the day. That may seem like a lot but it’s less than 10 cups. When you look at it like that, it doesn Continue reading >>

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

One of the well-known mantras of the ketogenic diet is very low carb intake and high fat intake. But there’s another nutrient that’s important to monitor when going keto—and a lot of people make the mistake of not considering its importance. That would be protein. Although protein is a critical element in the diet we need for optimal health, it’s important to not eat TOO much protein on the ketogenic diet. Why? Well, there are a couple reasons that we’ll be discussing below. How Too Much Protein is Bad for Ketosis The biggest energy source on the ketogenic diet is fat. In fact, around 75% of your diet should come from healthy fat sources. The key here is that, unlike the traditional idea of low-carb diets where protein is higher, protein intake should bemoderate, not high, on keto. Not following this advice will never allow your body to enter ketosis, which is the main point of going keto and reaping all of the amazing benefits. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is because our bodies have a fundamental energy process called gluconeogenesis. For a deeper dive into the topic, see our post on fixing the biggest ketosis mistakes. For now we shoud know the basics. Let’s break it down this mouthful of a term. The word gluconeogenesis has three parts to it, Gluco – coming from the greek root glukos – literally meaning “sweet wine.” Neo – “new” Genesis – “creation” So a great way to think about it is this is how your body creates new sweet wine for your body. Some people tout that “you don’t need carbohydrates to survive,” which is only partially true. To clarify, you don’t need to eat any carbs to survive, but make no mistake, your body needs carbs in the form of glucose and glycogen, and it will get this via survival mechan Continue reading >>

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). I personally recommend a cyclic ketogenic diet for most of my clients where you go low-carb for 3 days and then have a slightly higher carbohydrate day, followed by 3 lower carb days. This cycles the body in and out of a state of ketosis and is beneficial for hormone balance while keeping inflammatory levels very low. The biggest challenge with this nutrition plan is to get into and maintain the state of fat adaption. Here are several advanced tips to get into and maintain ketosis. 1. Stay Hydrated: This is considered a no-brainer, but is not easy to follow. We often get so busy in our day-day lives that we forget to hydrate effectively. I recommend super hydrating your system by drinking 32 oz of filtered water within the first hour of waking and another 32-48 oz of water before noon. I have most of my clients do a water fast or eat light in the morning doing smoothies or keto coffee or tea. So hydration around these dishes should be well tolerated by the digestive system. In general, aiming to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water and closer to your full body weight in ounces of water daily will help you immensely. I weigh 160 lbs and easily drink 140-180 ounces of water each day. Sometimes more in the summer time. As you begin super Continue reading >>

What To Drink On A Keto Diet

What To Drink On A Keto Diet

We have gone through what you should eat when on a keto diet but you should not forget that many of the calories that you get into your body every day come from what you drink on a keto diet. It is sometimes easy to forget just how much carbohydrates there is in soda, milk and other things you drink. It can therefor sometimes to be hard to know what you can actually drunk on a keto diet or other low carb diets. As a simple rule that you could always start out with. Water should be your primary drink on a keto diet. Whenever you are thirsty, have a glas of water. If you need something together with your food, have a glas of water. Water is simply the base of what you should drink on a keto diet (or any other diet). If you would like some taste when drinking your water you can add a few drops of lemon, but try to avoid it if you can. One of the main advantages with water compared to drink full with carbohydrates is the health benefits. Carbonated water could also be good to drink when on a keto diet but be careful of the flavored varieties that have started to appear in recent years. Many of these contain different sweetener or fruit juice so be sure to read the ingredients before you drink it. If you previously was used to drinking different kinds of soda, it is best to quit instead of choosing light variations since they usually are sweetened with sweeteners. Sweeteners are not very beneficial for the body, and it can make it difficult to get rid of your need for other sweet things. It is better to just directly quit drinking soda instead of cutting down on it part by part. Milk contains a low amount of carbohydrates per 100g (around 5% for standard milk) so many people think it is okay to drink milk on a keto diet. however be aware that the total amount of carbohydrate Continue reading >>

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