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How Much Water Daily Keto

Your 3 Day Keto Kickstart And Menu Plan

Your 3 Day Keto Kickstart And Menu Plan

So I’m writing this post today as much for me as I am for you. As some of you know, I’ve been doing the low carb and gluten free thing for 2 years now, with great success. Over the Summer though, I got a little lax and the weight started creeping on. I got serious for a bit, then lax again, then serious, then lax, etc. Since then I’ve been gaining and losing the same 12 pounds for about 6 months – a cycle I really, really need to break. In the last couple of months the situation has reached Defcon levels, because the 12 pounds has grown to about 18. This is UNACCEPTABLE, people!!! I need to start walking the walk, not just talking the talk! So I’m buckling down, getting serious, and hitting the Keto HARD from now on. I’m guessing many of you are in a similar situation, since blog traffic has about doubled since January 1st! So I thought I’d share some of my tips for getting into ketosis in three days or less. Then we can rock the low carb thing together and lose the weight for good! Some of you may be new to low carb eating, and whether you are following Atkins, Keto, or another low carb plan, there are a few basic things you should know. The following are some things that I’ve found to be true by my own experience with low carb/keto dieting: The IBIH Keys to Success on Keto… 1. Eat less than 20g net carbs per day if you want to get into ketosis. Net carbs are calculated by subtracting the fiber grams (or sugar alcohols in some cases) from the total carb grams. Don’t guess – you’d be surprised how many grams of carbs there are in things you might have considered “free” like onions, garlic, tomatoes, and kale, just to name a few. 2. Purchase some ketostix – they aren’t expensive and you can even cut them in half to get double the strips. S Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Beginner's Guide To Keto And Weight Loss

Ketogenic Diet: Beginner's Guide To Keto And Weight Loss

The ketogenic diet is a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet which puts the body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. When you're body is in a state of ketosis, the liver produced ketones which become the main energy source for the body. The ketogenic diet is also referred to as keto (key-toe) diet, low carb diet, and low carb high fat (LCHF). So why is it so awesome and why is it taking the world by storm? Because it completely reverses how your body functions (in a good way) along with changing how you view nutrition. It's based around the premise that your body was designed to run more efficiently as a fat burner than a sugar burner. Fat Burner vs Sugar Burner When you eat something that is high in carbs (that yummy donut), your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that is why it's the preferred energy source for your body. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by transporting it around your body. This sounds pretty efficient, right? The problem with this is that when glucose is used as a primary energy source, fats are not needed for energy and therefore are stored. With the average person's diet, glucose is the main energy source. This initially doesn't seem like a problem until you realize that the body can't store that much glucose. This becomes an issue for you because the extra glucose gets converted into fat which is then stored. Because your body uses glucose as it's main energy source the glucose that is converted into fat doesn't get used. When your body runs out of glucose it tells your brain you need more so you end up reaching for a quick snack like a candy bar or some chips. You can begin to see how this cycle leads to building up a body Continue reading >>

Keto Tip: 5 Reasons You Need To Drink More Water On A Ketogenic Diet!

Keto Tip: 5 Reasons You Need To Drink More Water On A Ketogenic Diet!

It’s often been said that most problems you run in to on a ketogenic diet can be solved by doing one of three things; drink more water, eat more salt, or eat more fat. Over the years as I’ve done this, I’ve found this adage to be fairly accurate as most of the “tweaks” I’ve done to get over a plateau or speed up my weight loss has been some variation of these 3 things. Probably the most powerful part of that truth is to drink more water. I’ve seen over and over again how upping my water intake leads to faster weight loss and a healthier overall feeling as I continue on this little weight loss journey of mine. Here are 5 reasons you should be drinking more water on a Ketogenic Diet Replaces Lost Water This is something I just didn’t know when I started cutting out the carbs and wasn’t prepared to deal with in those early days. Your body stores glycogen in water in your muscles. As your body burns through that stored glycogen and you don’t replace it because you aren’t eating carbs, your body’s water stores get depleted as well. This is why you tend to lose up to 10 lbs in the first week on keto and also what causes the “keto flu” or the miserable feeling that happens just before you switch over to being fat adapted. That feeling is caused by mild dehydration and can be shorten tremendously just by drinking more water. Like I said, that would have been awesome to know in those early days. Suppresses Appetite and Curbs Cravings This is another one of those things that I really wish I had known early on but every time you have a hunger pang or a sugar craving, just drink some water and they go away fairly quickly. In fact, even though I’m almost 2 years into this journey of mine, it is still the ever present glass of water on my computer desk t Continue reading >>

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

One of the well-known mantras of the ketogenic diet is very low carb intake and high fat intake. But there’s another nutrient that’s important to monitor when going keto—and a lot of people make the mistake of not considering its importance. That would be protein. Although protein is a critical element in the diet we need for optimal health, it’s important to not eat TOO much protein on the ketogenic diet. Why? Well, there are a couple reasons that we’ll be discussing below. How Too Much Protein is Bad for Ketosis The biggest energy source on the ketogenic diet is fat. In fact, around 75% of your diet should come from healthy fat sources. The key here is that, unlike the traditional idea of low-carb diets where protein is higher, protein intake should bemoderate, not high, on keto. Not following this advice will never allow your body to enter ketosis, which is the main point of going keto and reaping all of the amazing benefits. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is because our bodies have a fundamental energy process called gluconeogenesis. For a deeper dive into the topic, see our post on fixing the biggest ketosis mistakes. For now we shoud know the basics. Let’s break it down this mouthful of a term. The word gluconeogenesis has three parts to it, Gluco – coming from the greek root glukos – literally meaning “sweet wine.” Neo – “new” Genesis – “creation” So a great way to think about it is this is how your body creates new sweet wine for your body. Some people tout that “you don’t need carbohydrates to survive,” which is only partially true. To clarify, you don’t need to eat any carbs to survive, but make no mistake, your body needs carbs in the form of glucose and glycogen, and it will get this via survival mechan Continue reading >>

What To Drink On A Keto Diet

What To Drink On A Keto Diet

We have gone through what you should eat when on a keto diet but you should not forget that many of the calories that you get into your body every day come from what you drink on a keto diet. It is sometimes easy to forget just how much carbohydrates there is in soda, milk and other things you drink. It can therefor sometimes to be hard to know what you can actually drunk on a keto diet or other low carb diets. As a simple rule that you could always start out with. Water should be your primary drink on a keto diet. Whenever you are thirsty, have a glas of water. If you need something together with your food, have a glas of water. Water is simply the base of what you should drink on a keto diet (or any other diet). If you would like some taste when drinking your water you can add a few drops of lemon, but try to avoid it if you can. One of the main advantages with water compared to drink full with carbohydrates is the health benefits. Carbonated water could also be good to drink when on a keto diet but be careful of the flavored varieties that have started to appear in recent years. Many of these contain different sweetener or fruit juice so be sure to read the ingredients before you drink it. If you previously was used to drinking different kinds of soda, it is best to quit instead of choosing light variations since they usually are sweetened with sweeteners. Sweeteners are not very beneficial for the body, and it can make it difficult to get rid of your need for other sweet things. It is better to just directly quit drinking soda instead of cutting down on it part by part. Milk contains a low amount of carbohydrates per 100g (around 5% for standard milk) so many people think it is okay to drink milk on a keto diet. however be aware that the total amount of carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Of all the places to seek life-changing nutrition advice, I never thought the barber shop would be where I found it. But one day last January, after a couple years of saying to myself, "today's the day I make a change," my barber schooled me on something called keto. Normally, I take things he says with a grain of salt unless they're about hair or owning a business, but this guy could literally be on the cover of Men's Health. He's 6 feet tall, conventionally attractive, and his arms are about five pull-ups away from tearing through his t-shirt. If anyone else had implied that I was looking rough, I would've walked out in a fit of rage, but I decided to hear him out. I should clarify that I was out of shape, but my case wasn't that severe. I hadn't exercised in a few years and basically ate whatever I wanted and however much of it, but I was only about 30 to 40 pounds overweight. My barber went on to explain that this diet, paired with an appropriate exercise routine, allowed him to completely transform his body in less than a year, and all he ate was fatty foods. Once he showed me his "before" picture, I was sold. It was time to actually make a change. Short for ketogenic, keto is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet that forces your metabolism into what's called a state of ketosis. There's a much more scientific explanation to that, but it basically means that instead of burning carbohydrates (mainly glucose, or sugars), your body switches to burning fat as a primary source for energy. Keto isn't necessarily about counting calories, though the basic idea of eating less in order to lose weight still applies. This is more of a calculated way to rewire your metabolism so that it burns fat more efficiently over time, using very specific levels of each macronutrient Continue reading >>

Losing Water Weight: How Carbs Really Work

Losing Water Weight: How Carbs Really Work

Does going on a ketogenic diet mean you have to stay on it forever? Why do many folks experience a few days of low-energy moodiness (“low carb flu”) at the beginning of ketogenic diets? The answer to all of these queries can be found in understanding our body’s relationship with glycogen. Many people ask if is glycogen a carbohydrate. Glycogen is the way the body processes and stores glucose as energy, chiefly in the liver and the muscles. High intensity activities like sprinting draw upon the glycogen tucked away in our muscles for fuel, which is why you hear about marathoners “carb-loading” in the days before a big race. The glycogen stored in the liver is what keeps specific systems running all day, including the brain, kidney cells, and red blood cells. For anyone not low-carbing, the body needs a minimum of 100g of glucose each day in order to meet the basic demands of the brain. So — what if a person consumes significantly less than 100g of carbohydrates in a day? What happens when the body runs out of glycogen stores? The hierarchy of energy sources Your body’s just as lazy as you are on Sunday afternoon eating chips on the couch, and it will get energy from the easiest sources possible as long as they’re available. The zippiest energy comes from carbohydrates in the diet, especially simple carbs quickly converted into sugars (think white bread, sweets, fructose, etc.), with more complex carbs following shortly after. For a person following SAD (Standard American Diet) — we’re talking easily over 300g carbohydrates a day on average — the body may not ever burn through this ingested potential energy. Instead, it simply sweeps it away under the rug — you know, the one bulging around your waist — where no one will ever notice. When you cut Continue reading >>

Keto Flu And Electrolyte Imbalance [so Important!]

Keto Flu And Electrolyte Imbalance [so Important!]

Keto Flu and Electrolyte Imbalance [SO IMPORTANT!] Keto flu! If youve been following a very low carb diet and any of the following sound intimately familiar, theres a good chance you have the dreaded keto flu. Im shaky today, and my head hurts. Im feeling pretty weak today. I have a terrible headache!! And feeling shaky What have I done?! More than a few times I have felt like shaky and dizzy like I was going to pass out. Im shaky, headache, heart is fluttery is this normal? Severe leg cramps while sleeping? Calf muscles are constricting and waking me up! Been keto for four weeks now. The last couple weeks Ive been getting Charlie horses at night. What can I do to fix this?! You may be wondering, What kind of medieval torture is this? Why would anyone subject themselves to this willingly? All of the above are comments seen on the daily in keto forums. Doubleplusungood AF right? If I were a newbie, seeing this would likely make me run for the hills. Yes, all these symptoms are normal when youre experiencing whats commonly referred to as keto flu. However, for the sake of all thats ACTUALLY flu, Ill refer to it as what it actually is: electrolyte imbalance. Im petty like that, #sorrynotsorry. Luckily for you, there is a way to avoid all this yuckiness and lead a cramp-headache-shaky-flutter-brainfog-free keto lifestyle. Electrolytes are minerals present in your body, necessary for the proper functioning of your heart, muscles, and nerves and to carry out and regulate a number of processes such as maintaining your bloods chemistry and muscle action. They are obtained from either food or drink. What happens to electrolytes when you restrict carbohydrates in your diet? Your kidneys shift from retaining water and sodium to dumping both at a faster rate! Due to homeostasis, o Continue reading >>

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

162 Comments Good morning, folks. With next week’s The Keto Reset Diet release, I’ve got keto on the mind today—unsurprisingly. I’ve had a lot of questions lately on duration. As I’ve mentioned before, a good six weeks of ketosis puts in place all the metabolic machinery for lasting adaptation (those extra mitochondria don’t evaporate if/when you return to traditional Primal eating). But what about the other end of the issue? How long is too long? I don’t do this often, but today I’m reposting an article from a couple of years ago on this very topic. I’ve added a few thoughts based on my recent experience. See what you think, and be sure to share any lingering questions on the question of keto timing and process. I’ll be happy to answer them in upcoming posts and Dear Mark columns. Every day I get links to interesting papers. It’s hard not to when thousands of new studies are published every day and thousands of readers deliver the best ones to my inbox. And while I enjoy thumbing through the links simply for curiosity’s sake, they can also seed new ideas that lead to research rabbit holes and full-fledged posts. It’s probably the favorite part of my day: research and synthesis and the gestation of future blogs. The hard part is collecting, collating, and then transcribing the ideas swirling around inside my brain into readable prose and hopefully getting an article out of it that I can share with you. A while back I briefly mentioned a paper concerning a ketone metabolite known as beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and its ability to block the activity of a set of inflammatory genes. This particular set of genes, known as the NLRP3 inflammasome, has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and age-related macular d Continue reading >>

Never Thirsty On Keto Diet, Should I Be Drinking Lots Of Water Anyway?

Never Thirsty On Keto Diet, Should I Be Drinking Lots Of Water Anyway?

When I'm consuming lots of fat I'm never thirsty. I do get some liquid from bone broth that I use as a soup base for many of my meals but I rarely just drink water. I've read on the web that one should drink lots of water on a ketogenic diet to flush out all those ketones. Can someone provide a credible reference to whether drinking lots of water is a really good idea or not? (There's too much personal opinion on the subject hence the desire for something more scientific.) If it matters, I typically eat 5 to 10 ounces of protein a day, so not a huge amount. Update 12/29/13: Oops. I meant EIGHT to 10 ounces a day of protein. That should be 50 to 60 grams of protein. And, I'll probably start adding 3 or 4 eggs. The whites should be good for 20 or so more grams of protein, Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Electrolytes On A Ketogenic Diet

The Importance Of Electrolytes On A Ketogenic Diet

Many people who start a ketogenic diet often experience the dreaded “keto-flu”, which is the name for the experience of one or a combination of the following symptoms: Even if you are following a well-formulated ketogenic diet, with a low amount of carbohydrate, moderate amount of protein, and high amount of fat as suggested, it is likely that you may still experience some of these symptoms. The reason being while your macronutrients may be in line, there is another important factor to consider, ensuring you keep your body properly nourished and functioning well. That key factor is the balance of electrolytes in the body. In this article, we will cover the importance of electrolytes on a ketogenic diet. What Are Electrolytes? Electrolytes are minerals found in the body that are the electrical signaling molecules used for maintaining functions within the body such as regulating your heartbeat and allowing muscles to contract for functional movement. The most relevant electrolytes in this context are sodium, potassium, magnesium, chloride, and calcium. Why Monitoring Your Electrolytes is Important. When you shift to a ketogenic diet, your body tends to release more water as opposed to storing it. The reason being that there is less insulin produced as a result of the composition of the diet. This leads to hormonal signals via the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, signaling your kidneys to excrete MORE water and retain LESS. Along with increased excretion of water, the minerals found in that water are lost at a higher rate (1,2). In the end, you can quickly become depleted of the key electrolytes that your body needs to function properly. As a result, you can experience some of the negative symptoms associated with the “keto flu”. Getting The Right Amount o Continue reading >>

Keto Diet For Women: How To Make It Work + Tips To Overcome Side Effects

Keto Diet For Women: How To Make It Work + Tips To Overcome Side Effects

Far from being a new “fad diet”, the keto diet — a very low carb, high fat diet — has been used by doctors since the 1920’s to treat patients with serious illnesses. In recent years the keto diet has steadily been gaining more attention, due to how it promotes weight loss by forcing the body to burn fat for energy. More than ever before, a wider audience is now considering trying the keto diet, including those interested in benefits beyond weight loss. Examples include a reduced risk for diabetes, increased energy and protection against age-related neurological diseases. (1) One problem with the keto diet, however, is that to date, research studies aimed at investigating its efficacy and safety have involved only men or animals (mainly mice). Some have been skeptical then that the keto diet can work equally well for women. Others question whether it’s necessarily a good idea for women to even try keto given the fact that women’s hormones tend to be more sensitive to most dietary and lifestyle changes. According to certain experts in women’s health — such as Dr. Anna Cabeca, a double board-certified Ob-Gyn and Regenerative and Anti-Aging Medicine expert — following an alkaline ketogenic diet may be one of the most helpful lifestyle changes that both women and men can make. From her experience, “A keto-alkaline diet honors our body’s natural design.” Dr. Cabeca has personally taken care of more than 10,000 women through a combination of her online programs and in-office treatments, seeing firsthand the dramatic results that the keto alkaline diet can yield. Does the Keto Diet Work for Women? The answer is yes! In the years that Dr. Cabeca has been using the keto diet to help treat women, especially those in perimenopause or menopause, she’s har Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Ratio, Calories And Fluids: Do They Matter?

Ketogenic Ratio, Calories And Fluids: Do They Matter?

Go to: Ketogenic Ratio The ketogenic ratio is defined as the ratio of grams of fat to grams of carbohydrate plus protein. Higher ratios result in greater degrees of ketosis. Traditionally, the KD has been calculated based on specific ratios, based on patient age. Infants and teens were generally started on a 3:1 ratio and other children on a 4:1 ratio. The dietary ratio was adjusted to maintain urinary ketones in the moderate to high range (80-160 mg/dL). While higher ratios may confer better seizure control, they may also result in poorer tolerability of the diet (Nylen et al. 2005). A survey of worldwide use of the KD has shown that centers in India and Asia use lower ratios with good success (Kossoff and McGrogan JR, 2005). Furthermore, “newer” variations of the diet, such as the modified Atkins diet and the low glycemic index diet have significantly lower ratios, yet similar efficacy to the traditional diet (Kossoff et al. 2003, Pfeifer and Thiele, 2005). Studies have evaluated the association between higher ketogenic ratios and improved seizure control. In animals, higher ratios correlate with greater efficacy. Bough fed groups of rats KDs with ratios varying from 1:1 to 9:1 (Bough et al. 2000). All diets were calorie-restricted to approximately 90% of the normal daily requirement. Animals were maintained on the diet from P37 to P57-58, when testing to determine seizure susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures was performed. Weight gain and degree of ketosis was assessed for each group. Higher ratios correlated significantly with poorer weight gain and higher mean B-hydroxybutyrate levels (p<0.05 for both). The efficacy was significantly greater for animals fed diets exceeding a 6:1 ratio, compared to those fed 4:1 or 5:1 ratios (p=0.009 and Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should I Drink? – Beware Water Intoxication. Yes, Water Can Kill You!

How Much Water Should I Drink? – Beware Water Intoxication. Yes, Water Can Kill You!

There are a lot of “rules” and myths floating around on how much water you should drink. Some people believe you should drink half your body weight in ounces. In that case, if you weigh 200 pounds you should drink 100 ounces of water/day (not true). The “standard” is 8 glasses, or 64 ounces. However, you should let YOUR BODY tell YOU how much water to drink. Can You Drink TOO MUCH Water? YES. And it can be fatal. You heard me right – deadly. Drinking too much water can literally KILL you. Earlier this year, a 28-year-old California woman died after competing in a radio station’s on-air water-drinking contest. After downing some six liters of water in three hours in the “Hold Your Wee for a Wii” (Nintendo game console) contest, Jennifer Strange vomited, went home with a splitting headache, and died from so-called water intoxication. -source Unfortunately there is SO much misinformation floating around about how much water you should drink. I see people doing “water bombs”, which means guzzling large amounts of water at once as a means to consume the amount of water they were told they needed. This really concerns me. It’s important to know the FACTS… Understanding Water Intoxication Water intoxication, also known as water poisoning or dilutional hyponatremia, is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain functions that results when the normal balance of electrolytes in the body is pushed outside safe limits by over-hydration. Under normal circumstances, accidentally consuming too much water is exceptionally rare. Nearly all deaths related to water intoxication in normal individuals have resulted either from water drinking contests in which individuals attempt to consume large amounts of water, or from long bouts of exercise during which excessive am Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

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