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How Much Time Ketosis

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

Switching to a Ketogenic diet can be exciting, and you may be wondering how long it will be before you can expect to see results or ask “how long does it take to get into Ketosis?” This is perfectly normal, and almost everyone wonders the same thing when they switch to a low carb, high fat diet. The truth is, there is no one size fits all answer; it really does depend on who you are, what you eat, and how long it takes for your body to adjust. The good news is, for most people, this change takes place within a few days or weeks. Keep reading to find out how you can improve your body’s efficiency, and learn how to stay in Ketosis for the long-term. After all, it’s easier to stay in Ketosis once you’re there. How Do I Get into Ketosis? To answer your question of “how long does it take to get into Ketosis,” you must first ask “what is Ketosis” and “how do I get into Ketosis?” Let’s get started: Ketosis is a metabolic process and describes when the body uses fat for fuel. This occurs when there is a lack of glucose. As we generally eat a high carb, high sugar diet in the Western world, most people never enter Ketosis. Just because you lose weight does not mean you are in Ketosis, either, it just means you are eating a calorie deficient. When you switch to a low-carb diet and restrict your glucose, you might experience the Keto flu; these symptoms are your body learning to use fat as fuel, and signaling there is a change. For most people, this is a welcome change, but for other people, the transition takes a few weeks. It can even take a few people months to get into Ketosis, but this is usually because they are not following a strict Ketogenic diet. To get into Ketosis, you must: Eat less than 20g of carbs per day Restrict your intake of protein and Continue reading >>

How Much Ketosis Do You Need To Lose Weight?

How Much Ketosis Do You Need To Lose Weight?

How much ketosis do you need to lose weight? Can protein shorten life? And does eating extra fat really make you fat? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Clarification concerning Dr. Fung’s article “Does Eating Extra Fat Make You Fat?” If you review the responses to this article, there is total confusion. One even points out the article contradicts information previously provided on the site. While it is reasonable to conclude that most people visiting the site would be overweight and perhaps obese, if Dr Fung is correct, it would seem there would be cautions provided throughout the site concerning eating too much fat. I’m confused so please clarify. Thank you, Sylvia I think we do caution people not to eat too much fat. We say that for the best long-term weight loss effect, you should only eat more fat if you’re hungry. If you’re not hungry and you have excess weight to lose, don’t eat. Adding lots of extra fat to your meals – when you don’t need it to feel satiated – will indeed slow down weight loss. If you want more clarification – and some entertainment – check out the second tip in this short video: Best, Andreas Eenfeldt At what level of ketosis can I expect to lose weight? How long will it take before the body hits ketosis? I am only registering on the second colour of the strip tests, can I expect to lose weight at that level? Only been going just over a week, think I am fairly strict, maybe a bit of full cream milk in tea and coffee instead of cream all the time. Is it unrealistic to be in ketosis at this stage? Shelley Hi! You can certainly lose weight on that level of ketosis. It’s possible to lose weight even without ketosis. Ketosis is simply a definite sign that you’re burning lots of fat and that th Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis

In the era of instant gratification, many people want to know how does it take to get into ketosis? Well, wonder no longer. We have you covered. Your body is conditioned to running on sugar so it takes some time to switch to a new fuel source. For a very healthy person it will only take a week. It is much more likely for it to take 4 to 6 weeks before you start to feel differently. Many people want to know what kind of benefits you will feel when you get into ketosis? How will you know when keto is working? Well, there are several signs: You will be more satisfied after you eat Your sugar cravings will go away You will be hungry less often Focus will be increased with minimal brain fog Memory will be sharper Urination will happen less overnight It is important to remember that all of these things happen when you are all the way committed. You cannot do keto halfway. There can be symptoms along the way. These are often referred to as keto flu. One way to get rid of fatigue is by taking vitamin B5. If you are lacking this vitamin you will feel very sluggish. One way to get into ketosis quicker is by using ketones salts. While this helps you get there quicker, without the commitment from the diet it is useless. Another way to find out if you are in ketosis is by peeing on a stick. Might sound a little ridiculous but this gives you a good indication that you are in keto. Keto sticks tell you whether or not you are in ketosis. While it is not a sure thing, if you pee on the stick the color the stick turns to is a strong indicator on whether or not you are in ketosis. Most importantly, stick to the ketogenic diet and you will be in ketosis. It’s not an overnight success, but once someone gets into ketosis the benefits are unbelievable. Do not let the beginning discourage yo Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Back Into Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Get Back Into Ketosis?

This very much depends on how far along you are in your diet, how adapted you are and what your diet actually looks like (how low carb it truly is.) In the early stages, particularly if you’re not exercising (e.g. doing something that will actively help deplete your glycogen stores) then unfortunately it may well take about as long as it previously took you to get back into ketosis. You’ll just have to bite your tongue and “get back on the horse.” What are you using to measure your ketone levels? It is ideally advisable to get a blood glucose/ketone meter if you can (such as the Abbott Freestyle Optium Neo, which is what I use) to get a more accurate picture of your blood ketone and sugar levels. Unfortunately the ketone strips are not exactly cheap (Ebay is your friend however.) Further things (hacks) you could perhaps try to help speed up the process: Do 2 hours of cardio if you’re fit enough and able to do so (this should burn very roughly about 2000 kcal or so and therefore be approximately enough to mostly blow through your glycogen stores.) Use some MCT/coconut oil (preferably “XCT oil” or “Brain Octane” although again these are not cheap) in your diet. 1 or 2 teaspoons of Brain Octane should help get back into ketosis more quickly. Personally I have become accustomed to and quite like it in my coffee, this is so called “Bulletproof coffee”. (Don’t overdo it though, this is artificially introducing ketones into your system to help “prime the pump” but ultimately you want your liver to be producing its own ketones. Nonetheless this does seem to help speed adaptation and ketosis.) If you’re familiar with Intermittent Fasting, then you could do an 18/6 IF diet for a day or 2. The simplest way to accomplish this is to ensure you have your Continue reading >>

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Great article. You actually answered my question as to the ratio of the 3 BHB salts which is quite helpful for me. For me, I had Keto O/S and found it quite good – my favorite was the chocolate swirl. But it was and is very expensive. Only 15-20 servings and would break the bank. So I turned to KetoCaNa and I’ve tried two flavours. Both of them were so salty that I almost threw up every time. Like flavoured sea water. Also only 15 serving per bottle. Then I turned to Ketond which is okay – Tigers Blood and Caramel Macchiato. What I like about Ketond is that it has a full 30 servings and is very transparent with it’s ingredients. It’s also the same price as Keto OS but you get 30 servings. But still, not the best taste. So in the end, I ordered 1kg of pure BHB Magnesium from a supplier in China and I will be developing my own Ketone product with 30 servings as a lower price than all the competitors, and with more Magnesium, and Calcium in it than Sodium so that it tastes the best and actually helps with weight loss (which Magnesium is proven to do at the right amount). What the companies don’t tell you is that actually Sodium BHB is the cheapest, then Calcium BHB and then Magnesium BHB to source so I would be interested in knowing if what you wrote is actually true or just an excuse to make the product cheaper. Probably a mix of both. So I have 2 questions Ben: 1. If you had to split the 11.7g of BHB into Sodium, Ca, and Mg, what ratio would you do for the best health results and potential weight loss? The current products on the market are about an 80/12/8 split. I would think it should be the other way around. 2. When I develop my own product and sell it, would you be up for sampling it and reviewing it on your website here? What flavours do you like/would Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Fasting Ketosis

The Effects Of Fasting Ketosis

Understanding ketosis and muscle loss during fasting. The process of ketosis is one of the physiological effects of fasting in which the brain (and some other bodily processes) uses ketones produced from fatty tissues as a fuel instead of the usual glucose. This is called "muscle sparing". When glucose isn't readily available via the diet (in the form of carbohydrates) and the glycogen stores in the liver become depleted, the body could break down muscle to get it. But ketosis is an adaptation that will spare muscle during times of shortage by instead breaking down fat stores and manufacturing ketones for brain fuel. It is said this state is attained at approximately 48 hours of a water fast for women and closer to 72 hours for men. The effects of fasting ketosis have become a more popular and controversial subject in recent years due to low-carb, high-protein dieters relying on it long-term to "burn the fat". Where ketosis was once considered a "crisis response" of the body and fine only for short durations, there are some doctors who now contend ketones are an acceptable alternative fuel, produced and used by the body any time glucose is scarce, which can happen even in non-fasting, non-dieting individuals, such as during intense exercise or during sleep. They are considering it a natural metabolic process where ketone production and use fluctuates constantly in response to the body's needs. What is so controversial about the low-carbers use of ketosis is the long term, artificially produced, use of it. Over long periods of time, their high-protein diet produces excess protein by-products that become a strain on the kidneys to eliminate. Ketosis also creates a mild acidosis of the blood, which, over a long period of time is considered detrimental to our health. One ef Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis is an energy state that your body uses to provide an alternative fuel when glucose availability is low. It happens to all humans when fasting or when carbohydrate intake is lowered. The process of creating ketones is a normal metabolic alternative designed to keep us alive if we go without food for long periods of time. Eating a diet low in carb and higher in fat enhances this process without the gnawing hunger of fasting. Let’s talk about why ketones are better than glucose for most cellular fuel needs. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Body Fuel Basics Normal body cells metabolize food nutrients and oxygen during cellular “respiration”, a set of metabolic pathways in which ATP (adenosine triphosphate), our main cellular energy source is created. Most of this energy production happens in the mitochondria, tiny cell parts which act as powerhouses or fueling stations. There are two primary types of food-based fuel that our cells can use to produce energy: The first cellular fuel is glucose, which is commonly known as blood sugar. Glucose is a product of the starches and sugars (carbohydrates) and protein in our diet. This fuel system is necessary, but it has a limitation. The human body can only store about 1000-1600 calories of glucose in the form of glycogen in our muscles and liver. The amounts stored depend on how much muscle mass is available. Men will be able to store more because they have a greater muscle mass. Since most people use up about 2000 calories a day just being and doing normal stuff, you can see that if the human body depended on only sugar to fuel itself, and food weren’t available for more than a day, the body would run Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

CLEARLY the “eat less”, “eat low fat”, and “just eat everything in moderation” diets haven’t worked too well for most people. So, if you’re still trying to lose weight and keep it off, then maybe it’s time to try something that’s working for tens of thousands of people right now… The Ketogenic Diet. But is it all too good to be true? Yes, we believe Keto is fantastic for weight loss. We’ve just seen it work for way too many people (check out the success stories below). But it’s also not for everyone. So, in this post, we are giving you the real facts behind all the hype as well as real-life stories of people who have lost a lot of weight on Keto. PLUS, how to get started on Keto to lose weight in 5 EASY Steps. What is the Ketogenic Diet? THE HISTORY: Originally the Ketogenic diet was created as an effective treatment for epileptic children. BUT NOW: More and more people are finding that a Ketogenic diet has tons of benefits, including: a healthy way to lose weight, control blood sugar levels, improve your brain function, and potentially even reverse a myriad of health conditions. How does keto do this? The Keto diet puts your body into a powerful fat-burning metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. NUTRITIONAL KETOSIS: In nutritional ketosis, your body generally uses very few carbohydrates for energy. Instead, it switches to using ketones (which are produced from the breakdown of fats). That’s why the keto diet is often called a fat-burning diet… You can literally be burning your own body fat for energy! (It’s still unclear whether ketosis is the magical factor that makes a Keto diet so effective for weight-loss, but whatever it is, it seems to work!) So, how do we get into this nutritional ketosis state? You can get into nutritional k Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Reach Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Reach Ketosis?

It only takes 1-3 days to get into ketosis. But getting in ketosis is easy, becoming keto-adapted is the tricky part. It usually takes a month to get to the first stage of becoming keto-adapted, and it takes up to 2 years to fully train your body to use ketones fully. The body is always producing at least some small level of ketones. But the ketones themselves really aren't important, it's what their levels signify (fat breakdown). Once the available blood glucose and stored glycogen is used up, the body starts breaking down triacylglycerols (the fat we all hate) to use the resulting fatty acids for energy to get gluconeogenesis going in order to stabilize blood glucose levels. The results from this oxidation of triacylglycerols are ketone bodies. all of these metabolic processes are constantly occurring all at once to some degree, just some way more than others depending on the levels of insulin and other hormones. I just am looking for the specifics like what concentration of glucose is enough to signal the fed-state (when the body stores fat,) and at what rate the body uses the blood glucose it has. The reason a key symptom of untreated diabetes is rapid weight loss is due to them not making the needed insulin. Insulin is one of the key regulators for the fed state, so therefor their body chemically always thinks it is starving, even if there is abundant blood glucose, so it's always breaking down fats for energy to synthesize new glucose from precursors and tearing down muscles for amino acids. Once they take enough insulin, the body can then enter the fed state and start storing fat and rebuilding. So what I want to know is what amount of glucose at any given time is enough to raise insulin to the level needed to signal the body to store fat. I also realize that wi Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

Short Answer: 2-7 days In order for your body to get to the point where it is breaking down stored fat into ketones for fuel, it must first use up all stored sugar. The body stores excess sugar in the muscles in the form of glycogen. It is stored there to give the muscles access to a quick source of energy should the need arrive. You must first deplete the glycogen so the body is forced to use fat for fuel instead. There is about 2-3 days worth of sugar stored in your muscles so if you keep your carb intake at around 20g a day, you should deplete those stores within 3 full days. You can speed up the process by either fasting or exercising. The fasting will keep the body from creating new sugar from food intake and the exercise will cause the body to burn off the sugar faster. If you are using a ketone tester, you should start seeing a ketone reading by the third day and start seeing them increase over the course of the next 2 weeks to a month. As your body begins to use ketones more efficiently, you should see ketone levels drop to right about .5 mM can go as high as 5 mM. Any questions? Leave them in the comments below and I’ll answer them. Thanks! Don’t miss a post! Click here to sign up for out daily email! Need more info about the ketogenic diet? Sign up for our 28 day training program and weekly ketogenic meal plans! Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Of all the places to seek life-changing nutrition advice, I never thought the barber shop would be where I found it. But one day last January, after a couple years of saying to myself, "today's the day I make a change," my barber schooled me on something called keto. Normally, I take things he says with a grain of salt unless they're about hair or owning a business, but this guy could literally be on the cover of Men's Health. He's 6 feet tall, conventionally attractive, and his arms are about five pull-ups away from tearing through his t-shirt. If anyone else had implied that I was looking rough, I would've walked out in a fit of rage, but I decided to hear him out. I should clarify that I was out of shape, but my case wasn't that severe. I hadn't exercised in a few years and basically ate whatever I wanted and however much of it, but I was only about 30 to 40 pounds overweight. My barber went on to explain that this diet, paired with an appropriate exercise routine, allowed him to completely transform his body in less than a year, and all he ate was fatty foods. Once he showed me his "before" picture, I was sold. It was time to actually make a change. Short for ketogenic, keto is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet that forces your metabolism into what's called a state of ketosis. There's a much more scientific explanation to that, but it basically means that instead of burning carbohydrates (mainly glucose, or sugars), your body switches to burning fat as a primary source for energy. Keto isn't necessarily about counting calories, though the basic idea of eating less in order to lose weight still applies. This is more of a calculated way to rewire your metabolism so that it burns fat more efficiently over time, using very specific levels of each macronutrient Continue reading >>

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Go to: Abstract Although various studies have examined the short-term effects of a ketogenic diet in reducing weight in obese patients, its long-term effects on various physical and biochemical parameters are not known. To determine the effects of a 24-week ketogenic diet (consisting of 30 g carbohydrate, 1 g/kg body weight protein, 20% saturated fat, and 80% polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat) in obese patients. In the present study, 83 obese patients (39 men and 44 women) with a body mass index greater than 35 kg/m2, and high glucose and cholesterol levels were selected. The body weight, body mass index, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, urea and creatinine levels were determined before and after the administration of the ketogenic diet. Changes in these parameters were monitored after eight, 16 and 24 weeks of treatment. The weight and body mass index of the patients decreased significantly (P<0.0001). The level of total cholesterol decreased from week 1 to week 24. HDL cholesterol levels significantly increased, whereas LDL cholesterol levels significantly decreased after treatment. The level of triglycerides decreased significantly following 24 weeks of treatment. The level of blood glucose significantly decreased. The changes in the level of urea and creatinine were not statistically significant. The present study shows the beneficial effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. It significantly reduced the body weight and body mass index of the patients. Furthermore, it decreased the level of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose, and increased the level of HDL cholesterol. Administering a ketogenic diet for a relatively longer period of time did Continue reading >>

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